1993 World Series

Toronto Blue Jays 4, Philadelphia Phillies 2

The 1993 World Series pitted the American League and defending World Series Champion Toronto Blue Jays against the National League Champion Philadelphia Phillies, who looking to win their first MLB title since 1980. The Toronto Blue Jays picked up right where they left off in 1992, but their already well-balanced lineup now boasted future Hall of Famer Paul Molitor, longtime Oakland A’s workhorse, pitcher Dave Stewart, veteran starter/reliever Danny Cox and midseason acquisitions in All-Stars Tony Fernandez and all-time stolen base leader Rickey Henderson. They led the American League in stolen bases with the addition of Henderson (22) and Molitor (22) as well as stalwarts Roberto Alomar (55) and Devon White (34). Right fielder Joe Carter once again provided power to the Blue Jays squad as he clouted 33 home runs and Molitor (22), first baseman John Olerud (24), Alomar (17) and White (15) rounded out the power. Toronto won the American League East by seven games over the New York Yankees before dispatching the Chicago White Sox in 4-2 in the ALCS to gain their second straight trip to the Fall Classic. As for the Philadelphia Phillies, their formidable lineup led the National League in runs scored (877), hits (1,555), doubles (297), RBI (811) and on-base percentage (.351) while finishing second in team batting average (.274). The rag-tag group of mullet sporting Phils included former Met Lenny Dykstra, who led the team with 37 stolen bases, and four players who hit .300 or better – John Kruk (.316), Kevin Stocker (.324), Jim Eisenreich (.318) and Dykstra (.306). Catcher Darren Daulton and Pete Incaviglia each had 24 home runs to lead Philadelphia while they also got 19 from Dykstra, 14 from Kruk and 18 from Dave Hollins. They also had a strong pitching staff led by Curt Schilling and Tommy Greene with 16 wins apiece as Ben Rivera, Terry Mulholland and Danny Jackson each posted 12 wins or better. Closing was in the hands of left-hander Mitch Williams, who finished fourth in the National League with 43 saves. The Phils edged the Montreal Expos by three games to win the National League East and they then beat the two-time NL pennant winning Atlanta Braves 4-2 in the NLCS to get back to the World Series for the first time since 1983.

Game 1 seemed to be an indication of what was to come from the very beginning and both teams scored and scored often. With the scored tied 4-4 after five innings, Toronto put one on the board in the bottom of the sixth on a John Olerud solo shot and then tacked on three more in the seventh to beat the Phillies 8-5. Philadelphia came back to beat the Jays 6-4 in Game 2 as Terry Mulholland outdueled Dave Stewart to tie the Series at one apiece. The Blue Jays bats caught fire as Toronto rapped out 10 runs on 13 hits to win Game 3 10-3 and then outhit the Phils 18 to 14 to beat Philadelphia 15-14 in Game 4. After taking the loss in Game 4, Mitch Williams received two death threats phoned to his home field, Philadelphia’s Veterans Stadium. Philadelphia’s ace Curt Schilling responded in Game 5 with six strikeouts while allowing only five hits for a complete game 2-0 shutout of the defending world champions. With a three games to two lead heading into Game 6 at Toronto’s Skydome, the Blue Jays sent big Dave Stewart to the mound against Terry Mulholland in a rematch of Game 2.

The Jays jumped out to an early 3-0 lead with RBIs from future Hall of Famers Paul Molitor and Roberto Alomar and All-Star Joe Carter. The Phils battled their way back into the game tying the contest 5-5 by the seventh. In the bottom of the ninth, Toronto faced Philadelphia closer Mitch "Wild Thing" Williams, who had a career-high 43 saves in the regular season. Wild Thing walked the leadoff hitter, Rickey Henderson, got Devon White to fly out to left and then gave up a single to Paul Molitor. Carter stepped to the plate and worked Williams to a 2-2 count when Mitch threw a fastball that Carter tattooed over the left field wall for the 8-6 win. Leaping and jumping, Carter had the presence of mind to touch first base and continued celebrating around the bases as his teammates bound out of the dugout and Blue Jays fans erupted in celebration. Phillies third baseman Dave Hollins said, "It was the loudest sound I’ve ever heard in my life, the sound inside the dome." Joe Carter’s home run gave Toronto back-to-back World Series championships (1992, 1993), the first consecutive MLB titles since the 1977-1978 New York Yankees. Toronto Blue Jays Carter earned his place in the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame when he hit the most significant home run in Canada’s history and only the second walk-off World Series clinching round-tripper in Major League Baseball history. Who could forget the blast and then the ecstatic Carter leaping and jumping in absolute jubilation as he rounded the bases to win Game 6 by a score of 8-6? Certainly not Phillies pitcher Mitch Williams! Despite the heroics of Carter’s historic homer, Paul Molitor was named the World Series MVP after batting .500 with two home runs and eight RBI.