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Charlie Sprague played for three different teams during three years n the major leagues. He was primarily a pitcher during the first two seasons, but was a two-way player with the 1890 Toledo Maumees, for whom he pitched 19 times and played the outfield 40 times. As a pitcher for the Maumees, he went 9-5. He was a two-way player with the 1887 Lynn Lions before coming to the big leagues. In addition to his playing career, Charlie Sprague umpired one American Association game in 1890.

Dell Darling was a strong, tough catcher during the 1880s when few ballplayers used gloves or meager ones at best. One of the many to rise from the fertile amateur fields of Pennsylvania, Darling had a brief stay with the Buffalo Bisons at age 21 before landing a regular job in the majors with Cap Anson’s Chicago White Stockings four years later. A handicap of many catchers, his hitting wasn’t consistent; it relegated him to a backup and utility role through much of his career. He did have some power, though, being one of the few men to hit a ball over the left field wall at West Side Park in Chicago.

Pfeffer was one of the last barehanded fielders in baseball, and he was the first player to foil a double steal by cutting off a catcher's throw to second base and returning it to home plate. Known as an organizer among players, Pfeffer was active in establishing the Players' League in 1890 and was involved in an attempt to reestablish the American Association in 1894. He was a manager at the collegiate and minor-league levels, and after his baseball career he ran a successful Chicago bar until Prohibition. When the Players' League folded after the 1890 season, Pfeffer fell back under contract with Chicago. Pfeffer's relationship with Chicago manager Cap Anson had long been strained, and when Anson harshly criticized the Brotherhood of Professional Base-Ball Players (the union responsible for the formation of the Players' League), relations between Pfeffer and Anson deteriorated and the two were not on speaking terms for several years.[1] He was traded to the Louisville Colonels in exchange for Jim Canavan before the 1892 season.

Lifetime .273 hitter played with 5 major league teams between 1887 and 1891.

The nephew of Tom Evers and brother of Joe Evers, Johnny Evers was part of the famous Tinker to Evers to Chance double play combination with the Chicago Cubs of the 1900s and was known for his great glove and fiery demeanor. He and longtime middle-infield mate Joe Tinker did not speak to each other for several years as teammates. Evers is supposedly the player who realized Fred Merkle didn't touch second base during the infamous game between the New York Giants and Cubs during the 1908 NL pennant run. The play went on to be known as Merkle's Boner, as it cost New York the pennant. The game officially ended in a tie and because of that the Cubs and Giants finished with the same record. The Cubs then defeated the Giants in a one-game playoff at the end of the season. Evers was player-manager with the Cubs in 1913. In 1920, he was a Giants coach. After returning to the Cubs as manager in 1921, he spent the next two years across town as a Chicago White Sox coach before managing the team for part of the 1924 season. He later served as General Manager of the Albany Senators for a time. "I never learned to shut the clubhouse door in a lost ball game. I took it home with me and played it over again all night." Johnny Evers

For nine seasons Addie Joss was one of the best pitchers in the history of the American League, posting four 20-win seasons, capturing two ERA titles, and tossing two no-hitters (one of them a perfect game) and seven one-hitters. Of Joss's 160 career victories 45 were shutouts, and his career 1.89 ERA ranks second all-time only to his long-time rival Ed Walsh among players with 1,000 innings pitched. An exceptional control pitcher with a deceptive pitching motion, the right-handed Joss employed a corkscrew delivery, turning his back entirely to the batter before coming at him with a sidearm motion that confused most hitters. "Joss not only had great speed and a fast-breaking curve," Baseball Magazine observed in 1911, "but [also] a very effective pitching motion, bringing the ball behind him with a complete body swing and having it on the batter almost before the latter got sight of it." After nearly pitching the Naps to their first pennant in 1908, illness and injury limited Addie's endurance during his final two major league seasons, before his life was tragically cut short at the age of 31 by a bacterial infection.

From 1907 to 1912, "Big Ed” Walsh tested the limits of a pitcher's endurance like no pitcher has since. During that stretch the spitballing right-hander led the American League in innings pitched four times, often by staggeringly large margins. He hurled a total of 2,248 innings, 300 more than any other pitcher in baseball. He started 18 more games than any other pitcher, and led the American League during that stretch in games finished and saves, though the latter statistic would not be tracked for another 60 years. His finest season came in 1908, when Walsh became the last pitcher in baseball history to win 40 games, and hurled an incredible 464 innings, 73 1/3 more than any other pitcher in baseball. A fierce competitor, Walsh wanted the heavy workload the White Sox hoisted upon him. He also fielded his position with as much agility as any pitcher in the history of the game. During his six-year stretch of historic greatness, Walsh accumulated 963 assists, an amazing 344 more than any other pitcher in baseball. He fielded bunts like a territorial animal. Once, when a new third baseman came in for a bunt with a runner on second, Walsh got to the ball but couldn't make a play to third because it was uncovered. Walsh then reputedly turned to the third baseman and said, "If you do that again, I'll kill you. On bunts on that side of the field, you stay where you belong."1 Though he finished his career with the lowest ERA (1.82) in baseball history, Walsh's arm couldn't withstand the overuse, and by 1913 the "Iron Man" pitcher was a shadow of his former self. Despite winning an impressive 182 games before his 32nd birthday, Walsh finished his career short of 200 wins.

Best known as the player who Cleveland would not trade for the young Ty Cobb or as the man who won the American League batting title with the lowest average prior to 1968, Elmer Flick was more than just an answer to a trivia question. An underrated Hall of Famer whose on-the-field accomplishments are nearly forgotten today, Flick was a hard-hitting, fleet-footed outfielder who had his major league career curtailed by a mysterious gastrointestinal ailment.

Forever poetically linked to Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers by F. P. Adams' "Baseball's Sad Lexicon," Frank Chance made his mark as the Cubs' player-manager from 1905 through 1912 as part of the "Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance" double play infield. Although not widely regarded as one of the game's greatest fielders, Chance holds a special place in the hearts of Cub fans for his hustle and his hardnosed approach to motivating his players, not to mention guiding the much-maligned Cubs to their last two World Series titles in 1907 and 1908.

Among his banner years with the Cubs, Schulte lived up to his nickname in the 1911 season when he batted .300, led the league in RBI with 107, and assaulted National League pitching with 21 home runs, a remarkable feat during the Deadball Era. That year Schulte became the first player to top the 20 mark in doubles (30), triples (21), stolen bases (23), and home runs (21). Over the years only three other players have earned a place in the 20-20-20-20-club. The other three members? Willie Mays, Jimmy Rollins and Curtis Granderson. Schulte’s 1911 season was so spectacular that he won the Chalmers Award as MVP of the National League. The speedy Schulte also stole 233 bases over his stellar career. A bit eccentric, Schulte refused to use the heavy bats of the era, favoring a thin-handled 40-ounce bat instead, and would typically break about 50 bats each season. He also believed that if he found a hairpin on the street, it would predict his batting success, and he was often seen searching the sidewalks for hairpins before a game. Wildfire Schulte had the distinction of leading the NL in home runs in 1910 and 1911, played on four NL pennant teams (1906, 1907, 1908, 1910) and two World Series Champions (1907, 1908). By the way, he owns a .321 batting average in the World Series. Not too shabby. As his career declined, he was dealt to Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Washington, where he ended his Major League career with the Senators. Frank played and managed for another five years in the bushes until 1923. Three days before the World Series in 1949 Wildfire Schulte’s flame went out permanently. He was 67 years old.

John McGraw was perhaps the National League's most influential figure in the Deadball Era. From 1902 to 1932 he led the New York Giants to 10 National League pennants, three World Series championships, and 21 first- or second-place finishes in 29 full seasons at their helm. His 2,784 managerial victories are second only to Connie Mack's 3,731, but in 1927 Mack himself proclaimed, "There has been only one manager — and his name is McGraw." The pugnacious McGraw's impact on the game, moreover, was even greater than his record suggests. As a player he helped develop "inside baseball," which put a premium on strategy and guile, and later managed the way he'd played, seeking out every advantage for his Giants. Known as Mugsy (a nickname he detested) and Little Napoleon (for his dictatorial methods), McGraw administered harsh tongue-lashings to his players and frequently fought with umpires; he was ejected from 118 contests during his career, far more than any other manager. "McGraw eats gunpowder every morning for breakfast and washes it down with warm blood," said Giants coach Arlie Latham.

Evers was very high-energy and temperamental. As part of that famous double-play combo with Frank Chance and Joe Tinker, he was superb on the field. On the other hand, off the field, Johnny Evers and Joe Tinker never spoke. Evers once even stated that they truly hated each other. The two did not speak for 30 years. Some say it was because Tinker fired a baseball at Evers from a very close distance and injured Evers’ hand. Others claim that it was a result of a fight the two got into in 1905. In any event, the two remained passionate about the Cubs and never let their relationship interfere with their stellar play. Johnny Evers batted a respectable .270 over his career and stole 324 bases. He later managed both the Cubs and White Sox and served as a scout for the Braves. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1946. Evers was also involved in the famous 1908 “Merkle Boner” play, calling out the fact that Fred Merkle never touched second base and was heading back to the clubhouse. This set off a chain of events that became one of the more bizarre stories in baseball history.

Cincinnati Reds NL (1905) Boston Beaneaters/Doves/Rustlers/Braves NL (1906–1907, 1911–1912) New York Giants NL (1908–1911) Chicago Cubs NL (1913) St. Louis Terriers FL (1914–1915) A tough, hard-nosed shortstop, Al Bridwell was not afraid to mix it up once in a while. As a matter of fact, he once got into a pretty good scrap with his own manager, John McGraw. As the story goes, Bridwell punched McGraw in the nose, but was only suspended from play for a few games. In reality, McGraw actually respected Bridwell’s tough style of play and wished he had more like him on the team. McGraw understood Bridwell’s temperament and knew what buttons to push. Bridwell later acknowledged that McGraw was the best manager he ever had, because he knew how to handle the players to get the most out of them. Bridwell was the catalyst for the famous “Merkle Boner” on September 23, 1908, stroking the single that started the controversial episode. Over a period of 11 years, he played for five different teams, and put together some fine seasons between 1908 and 1911 with good offensive numbers. In 1909 Bridwell batted .294 with 140 hits and a .386 on base percentage. Over his Major League career, he was involved in some pretty big trades. In 1907, Boston traded Bridwell, Tom Needham and Fred Tenney to New York for Frank Bowerman, George Browne, Bill Dahlen, Cecil Ferguson and Dan McGann. Defensively, Bridwell was adequate but certainly no Gold Glover. His true value could not be measured in batting average, OBP, or hits. Bridwell was one of the original “Dirt Dogs” in baseball history. He ended his Major League career playing for the St. Louis Terriers in the doomed Federal League. After the league folded, Bridwell, like many others, played and managed for a few seasons in the minors before hanging up the spikes. He went on to live a very long life and passed away at the ripe old age of 85.

Every human being who has lived on this Earth has done so with a shaky psychological underpinning. Most of us manage to hold onto our senses and live out our lives keeping our balance. Then there are those unfortunate ones who lose their psychological balance and go under. Major leaguers are not exempt. Claude Rossman was one of the unfortunates. Sometime after his too-brief major-league career, he had a breakdown. He died in a hospital for the insane at the age of 46. The cause was paresis, or insanity caused by syphilitic alteration of the brain. On May 4, 1907, as a baserunner, Rossman was involved in an unusual triple play pulled off by the Chicago White Sox. All the outs were tag outs. Rossman was on third base and Germany Schaefer was on second when batter Boss Schmidt sent a groundball to shortstop George Davis. Rossman headed for home but retreated to third when Davis threw the ball home, but catcher Billy Sullivan tagged him out before he could get back to the base. Schmidt had reached first, rounded the bag and was tagged out at second. Schaefer, meanwhile, ran for home and crashed into pitcher Ed Walsh, who had taken the throw from second. Walsh dropped the ball, but shortstop Davis scopped it up and tagged Schaefer. According to Baseball Triple Plays online, there have been only 13 all-tag-out triple plays in the major leaguess. Rossman excelled in the 1907 World Series, batting .474 with a .579 slugging percentage on 9 hits, including a triple. He had two runs batted in and scored one. run. Unfortunately Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford did not come through for the Tigers, hitting .200 and .238 respectively. The Tigers fell to the Chicago Cubs in four straight. In 1908, Rossman experienced the best year of his major-league career. He hit for a.294 batting average, with 33 doubles, a slugging percentage of .419, 71 runs batted in and 13 triples. His doubles total was the second best in the American League. In the 1908 World Series against the Chicago Cubs, he was 4-for-19 (.211) with 3 runs batted in. The Tigers again fell to the Cubs in the Series.

Before Ray Chapman, Mickey Cochrane, Tony Conigliaro, Dickie Thon, and Adam Greenberg, the list of careers compromised by pitched baseballs claimed Danny Hoffman. On July 1, 1904, a Jesse Tannehill fastball caught the dynamic Philadelphia Athletics outfielder above his right eye, nearly killing him. Hoffman returned after months of recovery, and, despite significant damage to his eyesight, persevered to play another seven major-league seasons. But, like others who followed him, one pitch forever changed the trajectory of his baseball life.

In his interview with Lawrence Ritter for Ritter's classic book The Glory of Their Times, Davy Jones described the kaleidoscope of players who enlivened the Deadball Era. "Baseball attracted all sorts of people in those days," he explained. "We had stupid guys, smart guys, tough guys, mild guys, crazy guys, college men, slickers from the city, and hicks from the country." At times, Jones himself could seem a bit like all of the above. A rare collegian who possessed a law degree and later went on to a prosperous career in pharmacology, the intelligent Jones could also be quick-tempered and impulsive. Jones had run-ins with umpires, managers, players and fans, and once even bounced a knife-wielding robber from his drugstore. During his first years in the pros he jumped so many contracts that the press nicknamed him "The Kangaroo." "He signed so many contracts last winter that a half dozen lawyers could not have made a worse tangle," the Chicago Tribune quipped in 1902. When he finally settled down with the Detroit Tigers, the fleet-footed and pesky Jones became one of the game's best, though oft-injured, leadoff hitters. His most successful season in Detroit came in 1907, when he helped spark the Tigers to the first of three consecutive American League pennants. For years Zimmerman's inconsistency had fueled suspicion among some members of the press that he was a dishonest player, but prior to 1919 the accusations never rose above the level of vague insinuation. Words like "erratic," "episodic," and "problematic" left unspoken the fear shared by many that Zimmerman might have been selling ballgames. The events of 1919, however, removed all doubt. Before the season the Giants acquired the most notorious game-thrower of them all, Hal Chase, from the Cincinnati Reds. McGraw believed that he could reform the corrupt Chase, but instead of turning over a new leaf, Prince Hal repaid McGraw's kindness by shifting his game-fixing operations to a new city, recruiting Zimmerman as his new sidekick.

One could make a strong case for Joe McGinnity being the most durable pitcher in baseball history. In just 10 seasons in the major leagues, “Iron Man” McGinnity worked 3,441 innings and won 246 games. During the month of August in 1903, he pitched and won both ends of a doubleheader three times; he accomplished the feat two other times in his career. He pitched another 3,821 innings and won another 235 games in a minor-league career both before and after that one glorious decade in the majors.

Although he was one of the biggest men in the major leagues at the dawn of the 20th century, at 5-foot-11 and 206 pounds, he was hardly a power pitcher. In his prime years, he relied almost exclusively on a baffling, rising curve ball that was so dear to him he gave it a nickname, “Old Sal.” He used a peculiar underarm pitching style but also sometimes threw a devastating sinker with a more conventional overhand motion. John McGraw often said he thought the use of two radically different pitching motions may have lessened the strain on his arm and contributed to making him so durable. He said that when pitching his doubleheaders, McGinnity would sometimes throw one game overhand and work the other game with underarm motion. “He was a close second to McGraw when it came to needling players,” Ed Burkholder once wrote in Sport. “When he was on the mound, an enemy baserunner was in a constant state of nerves, and his bantering with the batter in the box contributed much to his success.”4 Legendary manager Connie Mack described simply described McGinnity as “a magician,” noting that “he knew all the tricks for putting a batter on the spot.” McGinnity also mixed in a healthy dose of guile and an almost unmatched understanding of how to manipulate batters. He occasionally blended in a spitball, was expert at using the quick pitch, and never hesitated to brush back a hitter who stood too close to the plate. His 40 hit batsmen in 1900 are still the major-league record.

Jake Beckley gained election to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971, 53 years after his death, most baseball fans had no idea who he was or why he should be honored with a plaque in Cooperstown. Beckley's reputation suffered because he never played on a pennant winner, and only one team he played for (the 1893 Pirates) finished as high as second place. Still, the colorful "Eagle Eye" compiled a .308 lifetime average, hit .300 or better in 13 of his 20 seasons (including the first four seasons of the Deadball Era), and retired in 1907 as baseball's all-time leader in triples. Beckley still stands fourth on the all-time list of three-baggers, behind only Sam Crawford, Ty Cobb, and Honus Wagner. He held the career record for games played at first base until 1994, when Eddie Murray passed him, but he still leads all first basemen in putouts and total chances.

As both a slick-fielding second baseman and legendary manager, Miller “Mighty Mite” Huggins definitely left his mark on our National Pastime. The diminutive 5-foot, 6-inch Huggins was bitten by the baseball bug while attending the University of Cincinnati. Although he graduated with a law degree, Huggins never practiced law, opting for a baseball career instead. Huggins proved to be fleet-footed, stealing 324 bases over his playing career, and was adept at getting on base. The perfect lead-off hitter, Huggins led the league in walks four times. He became a steady influence at the pivot position for both his Reds and Cardinals teams. Even though he was a skilled second baseman, Huggins found his true calling as a manager. He became player-manager of the Cards, and had some success in St. Louis but his teams never finished higher than third place. It is said that Huggins tried to buy the franchise when it was for sale in 1918, but his offer was rejected. Huggins then left the Cards, but Jake Rupert, owner of the Yankees, saw something in his management style, and the rest is history. Once in New York, Huggins took a group of undisciplined carousers and turned them into a spectacular baseball team. He systematically rebuilt the Yankees by bringing in new talent. Huggins corralled the great Babe Ruth, and recruited future stars Lou Gehrig, Tony Lazzeri and Earle Combs. His 1927 “Murderer’s Row” team is considered one of the best of all time. Huggins led the Yankees to World Series wins in 1923, 1927 and 1928, and to the pennant in 1921, 1922 and 1926.

Back in an era when a manager's responsibilities often included both the duties of a modern skipper plus those of today's general manager, Pat Moran excelled at each role. In a span of six years Moran took over two mediocre franchises with little history of winning, rebuilt and reassembled their players, and managed each to a pennant. Unfortunately, his place in the pantheon of great managers never solidified due to his unexpected and premature death at age 48. Although Pat Moran never became a star and played in more than 100 games only twice, he nevertheless proved a valuable player on several teams. More significantly, he excelled at all aspects of the manager's job, from assembling the players, to coaching the pitchers, to orchestrating a game, to the handling of men. After inheriting two of the National League's also-ran clubs he finished first twice, including one World Series championship, and second four times in only nine years of managing. For this brief period, Moran managed at as high a level as any manager ever. Sadly, a premature death robbed him of the extensive career he could have enjoyed.

An above-average centerfielder and one of the Deadball Era's finest utility men, Artie Hofman was a timely hitter and one of the fleetest men in the game. Known as "Circus Solly," a nickname some attributed to a comic strip character from the early 1900s, while others swore it came from his spectacular circus catches, Hofman garnered attention with his playing style and also his lively antics. He is "serious only when asleep," jibed Baseball Magazine. Along with fellow free spirits Frank "Wildfire" Schulte and Jimmy Sheckard, Hofman completed what Ring Lardner once called "the best outfield I ever looked at." During his tenure with the Cubs, Hofman played every position outside of the battery and was universally regarded as the game's best utility man before he became a regular in center field in 1909. Perhaps he is most famous as the outfielder who fielded Al Bridwell's single and called Evers' attention to the fact that Fred Merkle had not touched second base. Merkle's baserunning blunder and the disputed game forced a one-game playoff with John McGraw's Giants, allowing the Cubs to capture the 1908 flag. Hugh Keough, a newspaper writer who was friendly with Hofman, claims that the irrepressible Circus Solly fielded the ball and fired a curve to Evers, who missed it, allowing the ball to be picked up by Joe McGinnity, who lobbed it into the grandstand.

Outfielder Joe Kelley’s sensational play on the diamond earned him the well-deserved title “Kingpin of the Orioles.” He along with John McGraw, Willie Keeler, and Hughie Jennings made up the “Big Four” of the great Baltimore teams of the middle 1890s. Kelley was fleet of foot, sure-handed in the field, and blessed with a powerful throwing arm. At the plate, Joe was a prolific hitter who once connected for nine consecutive hits in a doubleheader. In the outfield, he was one of the best defenders of his day. Joe reportedly hid extra baseballs in the outfield grass on the sly in case the one in play got by him. Dubbed “Handsome Joe Kelley” by his multitude of female admirers in Baltimore, he kept a small mirror and comb in his back pocket in order to maintain his well-groomed appearance during games. In a 1923 interview, Kelley’s former teammate and future Hall of Famer John McGraw told a reporter, “Joe had no prominent weakness. He was fast on the bases, could hit the ball hard and was as graceful an outfielder as one would care to see. He covered an immense amount of ground and had the necessary faculty, so prominent in [Tris] Speaker and others, of being able to place himself where the batter would likely hit the ball.” Kelley played on six pennant-winning teams during his 17-year stint in the major leagues. He finished with a .317 career batting average, 443 stolen bases, .402 on-base percentage, and 194 triples. He knocked in 100 or more runs in five straight seasons and scored over 100 runs six times. Defensively, Joe was outstanding, posting a lifetime .955 fielding percentage in the outfield to go along with 212 assists. When his glory days on the diamond ended, he continued on in the game as a manager, scout, and coach.

These are the saddest of possible words: “Tinker to Evers to Chance.” Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double — Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: “Tinker to Evers to Chance.” On September 14, 1902, the scorer of the game between the Chicago and Cincinnati team wrote the results of a double play as Tinker and Evers and Chance. The following day, another double play turned by the trio was written Tinker to Evers to Chance. Those were the first and second times a scorer entered in the scorebook a double-play combination that in the history books is the most memorable of all time.

Rockford Red Sox IIIL (1904) Dubuque Shamrocks IIIL (1905) Dubuque Dubs IIIL (1906) Peoria Distillers IIIL (1907) Indianapolis Indians AA (1908–1909) Omaha Rourkes WL (1909) Rock Island Islanders IIIL (1910–1911) Dubuque Hustlers IIIL (1911) Seattle Giants NWES (1911) Paul Davidson had a steady career in the minors, playing for nine different teams. An outfielder with a pretty good glove, Davidson also pitched in 1911 for the Rock Island Islanders and the Dubuque Hustlers, going 1–4. His 1908 Indianapolis Indians team was managed by Charlie Carr. Davidson’s best season was 1910, when he batted .296 for Rock Island. After eight seasons in the minors, he retired in 1911 with 883 hits in 3,402 at bats and 911 games.

American Indian. Innovator. Renaissance man. Charles Albert “Chief” Bender lived a unique American life, fashioned a Hall of Fame career, and was an important member of modern baseball’s first dynasty. He silently struggled against racial prejudice, became a student of the game, and was a lifetime baseball man. His legacy, however, is less nuanced than all of that. Bender is known foremost for a rare ability to pitch under pressure. “If I had all the men I’ve ever handled, and they were in their prime, and there was one game I wanted to win above all others,” said Philadelphia Athletics icon Connie Mack, who managed fellow all-time pitching greats Lefty Grove, Herb Pennock, Eddie Plank, and Rube Waddell, “Albert would be my man.”

In 1907 38 year-old Hughie Jennings became the sixth manager in seven years of the downtrodden Detroit Tigers. Aided by a young phenom named Ty Cobb, Jennings proceeded to lead the Tigers to three consecutive pennants in his first three seasons with the club. Though he never won another pennant after 1909, Jennings continued to manage the Tigers through the 1920 season, accumulating a .538 winning percentage and guiding the club to 10 first division finishes in 14 seasons. Even though he had to deal with the temperamental Cobb during his entire tenure with Detroit, Jennings was the most colorful, animated and cheerful manager in the game. He sported a boyish, infectious smile on his freckled, red-headed Irish face. Umpire Tim Hurst called it "the grin that echoed." During the game he was constant motion, continually hollering his signature "Ee-yah!" and "Attaboy" from his third base coaching box while plucking the grass bare. Perhaps not surprisingly, given his gift of gab, in the off-season Jennings was a highly-regarded trial lawyer in his hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania. He achieved all this success despite a string of freak accidents--including three separate serious head injuries--unparalleled in the history of the sport.

One of the early power hitters of the game, Tim Jordan led the National League twice in home runs, smacking 12 for the Superbas in 1906 and then another 12 in 1908, a significant achievement during the dead-ball era. In 1906 he batted .262 with 118 hits to go along with his long balls. Defensively, Jordan was a very good first baseman. Although knee problems cut short his time in the majors, he went on to star in the minors through the 1916 season, playing mostly for the Toronto Maple Leafs in the International League, where he hit .330 with 20 home runs in 1911 and .312 with 19 homers in 1912. Jordan staged a comeback in 1920 to bat .256 in 238 at bats and 69 games for the International League’s Syracuse Stars when he was 41 years old. He then retired, with a career .296 batting average in 4,614 at bats and 1,291 games over his 11 minor league seasons.

George Browne played in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Phillies, New York Giants, Boston Doves, Chicago Cubs, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox, and Brooklyn Dodgers between 1901 and 1912. A member of the 1905 World Series champion Giants, Browne hit .227 with one RBI and two runs scored in the World Series.[2] Moonlight Graham, whose one-inning major-league career became famous through the movie Field of Dreams, replaced Browne in his lone appearance for the 1905 Giants. Browne's "World's Champions" jersey, which the Giants wore during the 1906 season, was exhibited at the Baseball Hall of Fame. After leaving the Giants following the 1907 season, Browne played one season with the Boston Doves and was sold to the Chicago Cubs; the Washington Senators then purchased him early in the 1909 season. He remained there until mid-1910, when he was sold to the Chicago White Sox. For his career, he compiled a .273 batting average, 303 runs batted in, 614 runs scored, and 190 stolen bases.

Known as "Gorgeous George" for his graceful play and blond locks, George Davis established himself as one of the game's most well-rounded players during his 20 seasons in the major leagues. At the plate, the switch-hitting Davis was a model of consistency, batting better than .300 every year from 1893 to 1901. In the field, the shortstop was steady and reliable, leading his league in fielding percentage four times. On the basepaths, the 5'9", 180-pounder was a constant threat, swiping 619 bases in his career, the third most ever by a player whose primary position was shortstop, behind Honus Wagner and Bert Campaneris. John McGraw described Davis as "an exceptionally quick thinker," a reputation which led to Davis spending time as the manager of the New York Giants. Yet despite his many achievements, Davis vanished from sight after his career ended and died in obscurity.

According to J.C. Kofoed of Baseball Magazine, Big Ed Reulbach was "one of the greatest pitchers that the National League ever produced, and one of the finest, clean-cut gentlemen who ever wore a big league uniform." A statuesque 6'1", 190 lb. right-hander, Reulbach employed the technique of "shadowing"?hiding the ball in his windup?as well as a high leg kick like that of Juan Marichal (according to Chief Meyers in a 1967 interview) and what was generally regarded as the finest curve ball in either league to become one baseball's most difficult pitchers to hit. He hurled two one-hitters, six two-hitters, and 13 three-hitters, and in 1906 he yielded 5.33 hits per nine innings, still the third-lowest ratio of all time. Reulbach also gave up fewer hits than innings pitched in each of his 13 seasons, a feat that was never accomplished by any pitcher in the Hall of Fame (Christy Mathewson and Cy Young also did it 13 times, but they pitched 17 and 22 seasons, respectively), and on September 26, 1908, he became the only pitcher ever to throw a doubleheader shutout.

Despite a sensational 1904 season in which he won 14 straight games and set modern records with 41 wins and 48 complete games, Jack Chesbro is best remembered for the wild pitch he tossed to score Boston’s pennant-clinching run on the final day of the season. Broad-shouldered with a sandy complexion, Chesbro normally carried 180 pounds on his 5’9” frame. Before mastering the spitball, he relied on an excellent fastball, which he delivered with a straight-over-the-top motion.

Sam Crawford sprung from fertile Midwestern farm soil, and like a storm blowing across his native Nebraska's prairie swept over the major league baseball landscape for nearly two decades. One of the Deadball Era's most consistent performers, the powerful Crawford never led his league in slugging percentage, but finished in the top ten in that category every year but one from 1901 to 1915. During that span the left-hander paced the circuit in triples six times, on his way to establishing the career record for three-baggers that has not been eclipsed in the more than 85 years since his historic career came to an end.

As a rookie in 1898, Vic Willis won 25 games as a key member of the pennant-winning Boston Beaneaters, one of the top teams of the nineteenth century. Eleven years later in his penultimate season, Willis again won over 20 games as a member of the world champion Pittsburgh Pirates, one of the top teams of the Deadball Era. In between he pitched well enough to finish with 249 wins in only a 13-year career. A big man for his time at 6-foot-2, 205 pounds, Willis pitched with an overhand delivery and was known as a great strikeout pitcher. In 1995, nearly a century after his major-league debut, the Veterans Committee voted the hurler nicknamed the "Delaware Peach" into the Hall of Fame.

Nicknamed "Derby Day Bill", Bill Clymer, was an American professional baseball player who played three games for the 1891 Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association (at the age of 17). In 11 at-bats as a Major League player, he did not collect a hit, but did have one base on balls and one stolen base. He went on to play 18 seasons in the minor leagues (1891–1906)[3] and was a minor league manager for approximately 29 years (spanning 1898–1932).[1] He was the second minor league manager with more than 2,000 wins

A side-wheeling left-hander with a great pick-off move to first base that kept runners close, Jack Pfiester posted a lifetime 2.02 ERA over eight seasons, the third best of all-time for pitchers with at least 1,000 innings, but he is best remembered for his seven shutouts and 15-5 career record against the hated New York Giants. "No longer will Chicago's fans struggle with the pretzel curves of the great southpaw's patronymic; no longer will it be mispronounced by seven out of every eight bugs and bugettes," wrote I. E. Sanborn of the Chicago Tribune after Pfiester's 2-1 victory over the Giants on August 30, 1908. "Pfiester, the spelling of which has been the occasion of as many wagers as its mispronunciation, will be dropped as meaningless and inappropriate, and for the rest of time and part of eternity Mr. Pfiester of private life will be known to the public and the historians as Jack the Giant Killer."

A flamboyant playboy and partygoer who dressed impeccably and always had a quip and a handshake for everyone he met, Mike Donlin “may have been the most colorful character in the National League during his playing career. … Prone to late nights after afternoon games, he was a night crawler in the truest sense. … He was cocky and self-assured and, when he wanted to be, also a damn fine ballplayer who appreciated his own worth.”1 For indeed, Mike Donlin could hit as well as anyone in baseball during the Deadball Era. Though he rarely walked, the powerfully built 5-foot-9, 170-pound left-hander was a masterful curveball hitter with power to all fields. His career slugging percentage of .468 compares favorably to better-known contemporary hitters like Honus Wagner (.467) and Sam Crawford (.452), and his .333 lifetime batting average might have earned him a spot in the Hall of Fame had he sustained it over a full career. But Donlin’s love of the bottle and frequent stints in vaudeville limited him to the equivalent of only seven full seasons.

MLB Pitching Record: 108–71 ERA: 2.23 Teams: Cincinnati Reds NL (February 2, 1881 - July 14, 1947) Chicago Cubs NL (1906–1910, 1913) Before Orval Overall’s MLB days, he pitched for the University of California at Berkeley and was captain of their football team. It might not surprise you that “Double O” lasted just—you guessed it—7 years in the majors. But they were a great 7 years. His career 2.24 ERA is 13th best in major league history. Overall was a Tigers nemesis during their three straight World Series appearances; he beat them once in the 1907 Series and twice in 1908, including the Game 5 clincher—a 3-hit shutout in which he struck out four batters in the first inning, the only time that has happened in World Series history. Unfortunately, his arm started to give him trouble in 1911, shortening his career. He attempted a comeback in 1913, but ended up retiring that year. He was nicknamed “The Big Groundhog” because his birthday was on February 2. In 1918 he unsuccessfully ran for Congress. He then became a very influential banker in Fresno.

He entered this world on Friday the 13th and exited on April Fools Day. In the 37 intervening years, Rube Waddell struck out more batters, frustrated more managers, and attracted more fans than any pitcher of his era. An imposing physical specimen for his day, the 6-foot-1, 196-pound Waddell possessed the intellectual and emotional maturity of a child — although a very precocious and engaging one at that. "There was delicious humor in many of his vagaries, a vagabond impudence and ingenuousness that made them attractive to the public," wrote the Columbus Dispatch.1 Waddell's on- and off-field exploits became instant legends. Known to occasionally miss a scheduled start because he was off fishing or playing marbles with street urchins, Waddell might disappear for days during spring training, only to be found leading a parade down the main street of Jacksonville, Florida, or wrestling an alligator in a nearby lagoon. Despite these and other curious distractions, Waddell's immense physical ability was undeniable. He complemented a blazing fastball with a wicked curve and demonstrated excellent control with both. His strikeout-to-walk ratio was nearly 3-to-1 for his career (almost 4-to-1 in his record-setting season of 1904.) Connie Mack, who managed Waddell for six seasons in Philadelphia, believed that Waddell had "the best combination of speed and curves" of any pitcher who played the game.2 Without Mack's patience and guidance, though, Rube Waddell might be nothing more than a humorous footnote in baseball history. Mack was the only manager able to tolerate Rube for any extended period, and that was only six seasons. But Waddell always remained a Connie Mack favorite. "Dad always had a gleam in his eye when he told stories about Rube Waddell," said Connie's daughter, Ruth Mack Clark. "Dad really loved the Rube."

Ballplayers of Irish descent - Hugh Duffy, Wee Willie Keeler, Big Ed Delahanty, John McGraw, et al. - played a major factor in our National Pastime’s surge to ever-greater popularity in the 1880s and the 1890s and the first decade of this century. According to a 1989 article in The Irish Echo, fully one-third to one-half of all major leaguers in the 1890s were of Irish ancestry. Joining those ranks in 1901 was William Alphonse Maloney. High batting averages were not Billy’s forte. Slick fielding and, especially, base stealing were where he earned his highest marks. It appeared for a while, though, as if he would not get another chance to showcase them. Following his rather unsatisfying 1902 season, he was sent down to Kansas City in the Western League (1903) and then Minneapolis in the American Association (1904). His work in Minneapolis impressed Chicago Cubs manager Frank Selee, however, and Billy returned to the majors - and a starting outfield berth - with the Cubbies in 1905. It would be his best year.

Frank Malcolm Owen (December 23, 1879 – November 24, 1942) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played eight seasons with the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox. Born in Ypsilanti, Michigan (and nicknamed "Yip" for it), he pitched the final six innings of Game 2 of the 1906 World Series, replacing Doc White. In 194 career games, Owen had an 82–67 won-loss record with a 2.55 ERA. Owen was the first American League pitcher to pitch complete game wins in both games of a doubleheader, winning against the St. Louis Browns on 1 July 1905.[1] Owen was mistakenly referred to as "Billy Owen" in the 1906 version of the "Fan Craze" board game, released by the Fan Craze Co of Cincinnati.[2] In 1904, as a member of the White Sox, in 315 innings of work, he handled 151 chances (21 PO, 130 A) without an error and also executed 8 double plays.

Fate: “The supposed force, principle, or power that predetermines events.” [1] Some people believe in it, some do not, though no one can be certain of its existence. But Fred Clarke was a believer in fate. In an interview with a reporter from the New York Herald in 1911, Clarke admitted, “I attribute my success to fate. ... Life is a funny game, and a little thing, almost a trifle, may make a splash in your affairs so big that the ripples from it will be felt as long as you live.” [2] Skeptics might write off Clarke’s words as the ramblings of a highly successful sports figure exuding false modesty as he nostalgically looked back on his career. However, a close study of Clarke’s life shows that the fiery player-manager may have had a better feel for what was happening to him than any skeptic could imagine.

“Turkey Mike” Donlin could have been in the Hall of Fame if not for his extravagant lifestyle. A notorious drinker and playboy, his off-field antics drastically altered a career that could have been great. Donlin batted over .300 in ten of his 12 seasons. His best year was 1905, when he was team captain and batted a lofty .356 to help the Giants win the World Series. He also led the league with his 124 runs scored that year. Donlin was a power hitter, finishing in the top ten in home runs for five seasons. Nicknamed “Turkey” for his red neck and strutting style of walking, Donlin cut short his own career. He ended up in prison for public drunkenness in 1902, causing the Orioles to release him. He also took several seasons off to act in vaudeville with his first wife, and had lost his edge by the time he returned to the game. He managed the Memphis Chickasaws in the Southern Association in 1917, and later scouted for the Boston Braves and New York Giants. Donlin dabbled in silent movies after his baseball career went silent.

A versatile athlete who played all nine positions at the major-league level, Roger Bresnahan is generally regarded today as the Deadball Era's most famous catcher, as well known for his innovations in protective equipment as for his unusual skill package that made him one of the first catchers ever used continuously at the top of the batting order. Catchers almost always batted eighth in the Deadball Era, but Bresnahan was adept at reaching base (he had a .419 on-base percentage in 1906) and possessed surprising speed despite his 5'9", 200-pound frame. Like his close friend and mentor, John McGraw, the .279 lifetime hitter had a quick temper and was inherently tactless. One reporter described him as "highly strung and almost abnormally emotional," but he also had a soft heart. During his five years as a big-league manager, Bresnahan reportedly fined more players and took less money than any of his peers.

Starting 217 games as a Browns pitcher and relieving in 49 more, Barney Pelty was, along with shortstop Bobby Wallace, the common thread on a team that flirted with destiny and fell into oblivion. Armed with an excellent curveball that kept opposing hitters off-balance, the 5'9", 175-lb right-hander recorded 22 career shutouts, but also was shut out 32 times, meaning that fully a quarter of his decisions ended as a shutout, one way or the other. In his best season, 1906, Pelty finished with a 1.59 ERA, which still stands as a record for the lowest single season ERA in Browns/Orioles franchise history, and a league-best .202 opponents batting average, but still won only 16 games. A man of cautious intelligence, with handsomely broad features and prominent ears that made him seem slightly older than he was, Pelty was often used by his managers as a field coach, and after his baseball career dabbled in trade and politics. One of only a handful of Jewish ballplayers during the Deadball Era, "the Yiddish Curver" made no attempt to hide his heritage, but was also not a religious person. If he faced anti-Semitism, he certainly never complained publicly or let it be known that it bothered him. He was a proud man who dealt with life the way he dealt with the hard-luck team he played for, with a quiet and dignified professionalism.

While only one major-league pitcher has lost 20 games in a single season during the twenty-first century, the now dubiously recognized feat did not carry the same stigma a century ago. In fact, during the 1901-1910 decade, 12 different pitchers for Boston’s National League entry produced 18 seasons of 20 or more losses. Among them were Hall of Famer Vic Willis; 20-game winners Irv Young, Togie Pittinger, and Chick Fraser; and eight other lesser known hurlers including Augustus Dorner. Gus Dorner was a 5-foot-10, 175-pound right-hander who compiled a 35-69 lifetime record with a 3.37 ERA over a six-year major-league career that spanned 1902-1909 and included stops in Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Boston (NL). A hard-luck loser who played for poor teams and received little run support, Dorner joined the fraternity of major-league pitchers who lost 20 or more games in a season when his name appeared in the loss column a National League-leading 26 times in 1906.

Hal Chase, whose big league career lasted from 1905 to 1919, was the most notoriously corrupt player in baseball history. He was also, according to many of those who saw him play, the greatest defensive first baseman ever. A cocky, easygoing Californian, Chase was the first homegrown star of the New York Highlanders (later the Yankees), but he wore out his welcome with them, as he did with just about every other team he played for during his fifteen years in the major leagues.

29 years before Joltin’ Joe was smacking the horsehide around American League parks, another one of the great players in Gotham set his own streak. And it was just as impressive. Rube Marquard, who was a pitcher on the 1912 New York Giants, put together a single-season winning streak that, like DiMaggio’s, still stands. Beginning with his first start of the season, at Brooklyn on April 11, Marquard won 19 games in a row. He didn’t lose until July 8. During the streak, left-handed pitcher Marquard had an earned-run average of 1.63.

Tully “Topsy” Hartsel finished in the league’s top ten in walks in ten out of his 14 MLB seasons. In five of those seasons, he led the league. The main reason is that at 5 feet 5 inches and 155 pounds, Hartsel presented a small target for pitchers of the day. His 121 walks in 1905 remained a league record until pitchers started pitching around Babe Ruth in the 1920s. The diminutive leadoff hitter hit .276 over his big league career, leading the A’s to four pennants in his ten seasons in Philly. He twice topped .400 in on-base percentage, leading the league both times, and twice topped 100 runs scored, leading the league with 109 in 1902. A respected baseball mind and gifted sign stealer, Hartsel was essentially an on-the-field coach to Connie Mack for most of his time with the A’s. Hartsel went on to manage the American Association’s Toledo Mud Hens from 1912 to 1914, and retired in Toledo to open an “automatic baseball” business. He later worked at the Community Traction Company until 1941 and managed their baseball team.

Today Harry Steinfeldt is the answer to a oft-heard trivia question: Who was the third baseman in the Cubs' famous Joe Tinker-to-Johnny Evers-to-Frank Chance infield? In his time, however, the .267 lifetime hitter was considered one of the greatest third basemen in the game. "Harry Steinfeldt, the Cubs third baseman whose glorious fielding kept the dashing Ty Cobb off the base paths in a couple of world's series, and whose lusty wallops sent many a fellow-Cub scampering across home plate in the last few years, is another who was dubbed unfit by an erring leader in ill-fated Cincinnati," wrote Alfred H. Spink in 1910. "Harry left the haunts of the Reds, jumped in and completed Frank Chance's sterling infield, and still holds his court there, a veritable terror to seekers of base hits and stolen cushions."

A side-wheeling left-hander with a great pick-off move to first base that kept runners close, Jack Pfiester posted a lifetime 2.02 ERA over eight seasons, the third best of all-time for pitchers with at least 1,000 innings, but he is best remembered for his seven shutouts and 15-5 career record against the hated New York Giants. "No longer will Chicago's fans struggle with the pretzel curves of the great southpaw's patronymic; no longer will it be mispronounced by seven out of every eight bugs and bugettes," wrote I. E. Sanborn of the Chicago Tribune after Pfiester's 2-1 victory over the Giants on August 30, 1908. "Pfiester, the spelling of which has been the occasion of as many wagers as its mispronunciation, will be dropped as meaningless and inappropriate, and for the rest of time and part of eternity Mr. Pfiester of private life will be known to the public and the historians as Jack the Giant Killer."

Considered by many to be the first great utility man in baseball history, “Circus Solly” Hofman played just about every position at some point in his career. Known for his timely hitting, good defense and colorful character, Hofman was popular with the fans and teammates alike. He also had a reputation for speed on the basepaths and was an expert sign stealer. Some say Hofman got his nickname because of the spectacular “circus catches” that he made, but others say that the moniker was from a popular comic strip. With the Cubs for most of his career, Hofman was utility man during the Cubs three straight National League pennant years from 1906 through 1908. The Cubs were Series Champs in 1907 and 1908, and Hofman was a contributor in the post season, batting .298 in three World Series. As a matter of fact, he is credited with calling attention to Fred Merkle’s 1908 base-running error, the famous “Merkle Boner.” According to Hofman, Merkle did not touch second base. This eventually led to a one-game playoff with the Giants and the victorious Cubs won the pennant and the Series.

St. Louis Browns AA (1891) Boston Reds AA (1891) Chicago Colts/Orphans NL (1893–1900) Chicago White Sox AL (player-manager: 1901–1902) New York Highlanders AL (player-manager: 1903–1907; manager: 1908) Cincinnati Reds NL (player-manager: 1909; manager: 1910–1911) Washington Senators AL (player-manager: 1912–1914; manager: 1915–1920; owner: 1920–1955) Baseball has never seen a more diversely accomplished man than Clark Griffith, a Hall of Famer renowned for his amazing feats as a player, manager, and owner. Griffith won 237 games over a 20-year pitching career for the American Association’s St. Louis Browns and Boston Reds, as well as the Chicago Colts/Orphans, White Sox, New York Highlanders, Cincinnati Reds, and Senators. He won more than 20 games for six consecutive seasons with the Colts/Orphans (1894–1899), enjoying his best year as a player in 1898 when he went 24–10 and led the National League with a 1.88 ERA. In 1900, Griffith spearheaded the Ball Players Protective Association, which essentially led to the establishment of the American League in 1901. That year, as player-manager of the White Sox, he posted a 24-win season and led Chicago to the inaugural AL pennant, his only title as a manager. After stints as player-manager with the Highlanders and Reds, Griffith mortgaged his Montana family ranch in 1911 to purchase a stake in the Senators and become the team’s player-manager. Dubbed the “Old Fox” for his shrewd intellect, Griffith would be as influential in Washington as any U.S. President. Of course, Walter Johnson had a little something to do with that, leading the AL in wins five seasons during Griffith’s stint as manager. In 1920, Griffith became the majority owner of the Senators and, in 1924, brought D.C. its only World Championship, beating the Giants in seven games. Washington returned to the Series in 1925, but lost to the Pirates, also in seven games. Griffith played no favorites. He traded his niece’s husband, future Hall of Famer Joe Cronin, to the Red Sox in 1934. He also sold his nephew, Sherry Robertson, to the Athletics in 1952. More importantly, Griffith was recognized as a pioneer in bringing dozens of Cuban players to the majors. As health issues mounted, Griffith ceded control of the franchise to his nephew, Calvin Griffith, who would eventually move the team to Minnesota as the Twins in 1961. Clark Griffith died in 1955, but his influence on the game remains very much alive to this day.

An excellent bunter, accomplished base stealer, and pesky left-handed hitter who usually had the National League's best walk-to-strikeout ratio after his first few seasons in the big leagues, Johnny Evers was considered one of the Deadball Era's smartest and best all-around players. He was just as well known for his fiery disposition. The star second baseman's nickname, "The Human Crab," was originally bestowed on him due to his unorthodox manner of sidling over to ground balls before gobbling them up, but most baseball men considered it better suited to his temperament than his fielding. A 5'9", 125-pound pepper-pot with a protruding jaw that came to be a symbol of the man - for he was always “jawing” about something - Evers developed a reputation as a troublemaker by squabbling regularly with teammates, opponents, and especially umpires. "They claim he is a crab, and perhaps they are right," Cleveland Indians manager Joe Birmingham once observed. "But I would like to have 25 such crabs playing for me. If I did, I would have no doubts over the pennant. They would win hands down."

Before his death in 1961, Ed Reulbach held the distinction of being the last living Cub to have won a World Series. He joined the Cubbies in 1905 and quickly impressed with 18 wins and an ERA of 1.42. The following year, he contributed 19 wins to a league-leading 1.75 team ERA which earned the Cubs a trip to the World Series. In the Fall Classic, Reulbach pitched a complete game one-hitter, but the Cubs fell to the crosstown rival White Sox in six games. He was the National League win-loss percentage leader for three seasons (1906–1908) and enjoyed two winning streaks of 14 games or more. On September 26, 1908, “Big Ed” Reulbach surpassed these impressive accomplishments with one that may never be duplicated. He pitched two complete game shutouts in one day against the Brooklyn Superbas. Sadly, 97 wins and two World Series Championships in his first five seasons were not enough to get Reulbach to Cooperstown. In 1910, his ERA rose while his innings pitched tumbled. That season, his only child became seriously ill with diphtheria and Reulbach missed multiple games to be with his son. His career would last another seven seasons with stops in Brooklyn, Boston, and the Newark Pepper of the Federal League. During the latter part of his career, Reulbach helped found the Baseball Players’ Fraternity to help fight for higher player salaries, and he even tried to convince MLB players to abstain from alcohol. After his retirement, he nearly sacrificed his own well-being to care for his sickly son, who passed away in 1931. The accomplishments of fellow Cub pitcher Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown were more notable, but “Big Ed” Reulbach was a big part of the Cubs’ successful run in the early years of the 20th century.

If Ginger Beaumont is remembered today, it's usually for being the first batter in modern World Series history. In the early days of the Deadball Era, however, he was considered baseball's finest leadoff man, a lifetime .311 hitter who was good enough to be named by both Bill Klem and Honus Wagner as the center fielder on their all-time teams. When contemporary observers spoke of Beaumont, they tended to focus on his surprising speed (he was once clocked from home to first in 4.4 seconds)--surprising because his typical playing weight was 190 lbs. on a 5'8" frame. "He was an excellent base runner, being very fast on his feet, but nobody who saw him for the first time ambling along on his way to the batter's box would admit this," wrote sportswriter John Gruber. "A lazier or more indifferent-appearing player, emphasized by a burly body, could not be conceived. But when he hit the ball he was off like a streak, which astonished the uninitiated and made him one of the wonders of the century."

Thought by many to have the best throwing arm of his era, Jimmy Archer made his money by pegging out would-be base stealers and by his patented snap throw from the squat. This talent may have come from tragedy. As a teenager in Canada, Archer worked in a Toronto barrel cooperage, and severely injured his arm when he fell into a vat of scalding oak sap. Although the injuries healed with time, the tendon in his right arm contracted. This physiological twist of fate enabled him to perfect the snap throw. A Chicago Cub from 1909 until 1917, Archer led the National League in assists for a catcher in 1912 and was consistently in the top five in that category. In 1910, he threw out more than 54 percent of the runners who attempted to steal, best in the NL. At 5-foot, 10-inches, and 168 pounds, Archer was built low to the ground and was also perennially in the top five in fielding percentage, putouts, and games played as a catcher. Born in Dublin, Ireland, Archer did not have the luck of the Irish in the postseason. He played for the Tigers in 1907 when the team lost to the Cubs in the World Series. Three years later, he was on the Cubs as they lost to Philadelphia in the Series. Archer hit just .143 in World Series play. Jimmy Archer’s career ended in 1918, and he retired to a life of competitive bowling and softball. He was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990 and will forever be remembered for making “snap” decisions behind the plate.

As part of the A’s $100,000 infield along with Stuffy McInnis, Eddie Collins and Black Jack Barry, Frank “Home Run” Baker was an exceptional third baseman and an outstanding hitter whose place in the Hall of Fame is well deserved. Initially, it was thought that the young Baker would not make the grade in Major League baseball. However, Buck Herzog, a friend who was already playing in the majors, convinced a few people to take a shot on the gifted third baseman. There have been many great second baseman over the annals of baseball history; Jackie Robinson and Rogers Hornsby to name a few. When you take a hard look at the numbers, it becomes difficult not to name Eddie Collins as possibly the greatest of all time. He gets our vote, hands down, as the best second baseman in this group.

Joseph Aloysius "Joe" Ward (September 7, 1884 - August 11, 1934) spent three seasons as a Major League Baseball player, primarily as a second baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies (1906, 1909-1910). Ward appeared in 35 games for the Phillies in 1906, batting .295 with 38 hits. After leaving the big leagues for two years, he returned for nine games with the New York Highlanders (1909) before heading back to Philadelphia for the remainder of his career. In 166 games, Ward had 110 hits in 465 at-bats, with a .237 batting average. Edward Lee Foster (February 13, 1887 - January 15, 1937) appeared in only six games with the Cleveland Naps (1908), but played 13 years in the minor leagues from 1907 to 1923. He spent significant time with the New Haven Prairie Hens and the St. Paul Saints of the Connecticut State League and the American Association, respectively. Unofficially, Ed posted a 126-106 record in 304 minor league games. Foster had a 1-0 record in six games, one start and five games

“Iron Man” Joe McGinnity claimed his nickname came from his off-season work in a foundry, but he was an iron man on the mound as well. In 1903 he became famous for pitching both ends of doubleheaders three times in 1 month, winning all 6 games. That year he also won 31 games while pitching 434 innings, which is still a record to this day. McGinnity led the league in innings pitched four times from 1900 to 1905. Over his spectacular career, he led the National League in wins five times and led the league in games played by a pitcher six times. McGinnity didn’t start his MLB career until age 28, but he pitched in the pros until he was 54 and won 246 MLB games and another 207 in the minors. On his T206 card he is shown in his uniform for the Newark Indians, where he was player/manager from 1909 to 1912 and his pitching record was 87–64. His durability was due to a mix of deliveries, including an underhand curve he called “Old Sal.” McGinnity was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1946.

Joe Lake came up to the Highlanders after going 25–14 for the Jersey City Skeeters of the Eastern League in 1907. He was a journeyman pitcher who had a relatively ineffective MLB career. He led the league with 22 losses in his rookie year, and did not fare much better than that later on. Lake did manage to go 14–11 in 1909, but then lost 17 games in 1910 and 15 games in 1911. He had a pretty good career 2.85 ERA, but never got a lot of support. Lake finished the 1913 season with the Minneapolis Millers in the American Association with a 5–3 record, and went 16–13 for them in 1914 before retiring from the game when he was 33 years old. Bobby Wallace was the first great defensive shortstop in baseball, and perhaps the first player to field his way into the Hall of Fame. He redefined infield play by refining the process of fielding and throwing a grounder, diminishing the role of the infield hit in the early game. In 1902, after the AL Browns lured him away from the NL Cardinals for a 5-year contract worth a staggering (for the times) $32,000, Wallace fielded 17 chances in a game—still the American League record today. He became the player/manager for the Browns for two seasons, going 57–134. After retiring, Wallace played and managed in the minors for 2 years, umpired in the American League for 2 years, then managed the Reds for 25 games, going 5–20. Bobby Wallace was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1953.

Mordecai Peter Centennial “Three Finger” Brown One of the most dominant pitchers of the Deadball Era, “Three Finger” Mordecai Brown won at least 20 games on six different occasions and won at least 12 games over another five seasons. Brown turned a serious childhood injury to his throwing hand to his advantage, working to develop a mind-boggling curve ball that simply froze batters in their tracks. Besides earning him a nickname, Brown’s injury also allowed him to throw a very deceptive change-up that baffled batters. Brown’s battles against one of our All-Star pitchers, Christy Mathewson, were legendary. He had a superb season in 1908 when he went 29–9 with a 1.47 ERA, and his 27 wins in 1909 led the National League. His amazing stats include leading the NL in saves four seasons running (1908–1911), shutouts twice (1906, 1910), complete games twice (1909, 1910), ERA (1906), and fielding percentage (1908). Although Brown pitched in many renowned World Series games, he always maintained that his best performance was in the one-game playoff after the Merkle debacle. As his career was winding down, Brown made a brief stop to the Federal League, managing the Terriers for part of the 1914 season, and then finished back in the National League. Arthur Frederick “Solly” Hofman Considered by many to be the first great utility man in baseball history, “Circus Solly” Hofman played just about every position at some point in his career. Known for his timely hitting, good defense and colorful character, Hofman was popular with the fans and teammates alike. He also had a reputation for speed on the basepaths and was an expert sign stealer. Some say Hofman got

Over a span of six years from 1907 to 1912, “Big Ed” Walsh was as good as or better than any Major League pitcher. During that time, he averaged 25 wins and 374 innings pitched per season, with an average ERA well below 2.00. His overall lifetime earned-run average of 1.82 is still a Major League record. Walsh helped the White Sox to the pennant in 1906 with his 17–13 record and 1.88 ERA. The Sox beat their crosstown rivals, the Cubs, 4–2 in the Series with the support of Walsh’s fine pitching. His 2–0 record with a miniscule 0.60 ERA and 17 Ks was a sign of things to come. In 1908 Walsh led the league with his 40 wins, 42 complete games, 11 shutouts, 6 saves, 464 innings pitched, 269 strikeouts, and .727 win-loss percentage. One point of reference is that Walsh’s “out pitch” was the spitter that was later banned from baseball. Although he played a total of 14 seasons in the majors, the years after 1912 were unproductive for Walsh. After that season, his arm was pretty much burned out, but he managed to stick around for five more years. Ed Walsh certainly left his mark, however. Besides holding the record for the lowest career ERA in MLB history, he led the American League in innings pitched on four occasions; ranks number two all-time in WHIP (1.00), and had a total of five 200-plus strikeout seasons.

Pitcher Al Mattern had a 5-year stint with Boston after going 16–7 for the Holyoke Papermakers of the Connecticut State League in 1907 and 20–21 for the Tri-State League’s Trenton Tigers in 1908. He went 15–21 in 1909 (with an ERA of 2.85) and 16–19 in 1910. Mattern was a real workhorse those 2 years, pitching 316 innings in 1909 and 305 in 1910. He led the league in batters faced (1,314) in 1909, but unfortunately he also led the league in earned runs (100), hits (322), and walks (108). In 1910 he led the league in games pitched (51) and shutouts (6). Mattern was probably a much better pitcher than his record indicates. He finished up playing in the minors in the International League for the Montreal Royals and the Newark Indians, retiring in 1914 with an 82–76 record.

Ambrose Moses "Amby" McConnell (April 29, 1883 - May 20, 1942) was one of those Major League players who played significantly longer in the minor leagues, but at one point during his brief career in the big leagues left his mark that will forever stand as a Major League first. On July 19, 1909, Amby, then a Boston Red Sox, became the first player in history to hit into an unassisted triple play against the Cleveland Indians. The Vermont native began playing second base professionally in the Northeast in the New York Tate League and the Eastern League before the Boston Americans signed him in 1907. McConnell spent four seasons with the Red Sox (1908-1910) and the Chicago White Sox (1910-1911). He was an average player both at the plate and in the field who never really had the success he enjoyed as a minor leaguer. He will however forever be immortalized for being the first to hit into the unassisted triple play. With teammate Heinie Wagner on second and Jake Stahl standing on first, Amby’s manager Fred Lake called for a hit-an-run after McConnell worked the count to full. Amby then hit a line drive off Cy Young to second baseman Neal Ball who proceeded to step on second for and then tagged the approaching Stahl for the triple play. In 1910, Amby suffered through a debilitating arm injury and then appendicitis before being shipped to Chicago where he played one more season before returning to the minors for good. Amby McConnell finished his 4-year Major League career with a .264 average, 398 hits, 202 runs, 119 RBI and 72 stolen bases. As a 15-year minor league veteran, he hit .307 with 1,584 hit

Arnold George “Peewee” Hauser (September 25, 1888 - May 22, 1966) spent five seasons as a Major League Baseball shortstop whose professional career was often overshadowed by a series of personal tragedies. The bulk of Hauser’s career was spent with the St. Louis Cardinals (1910-1913). In 1912, he had 73 runs and 124 hits with 14 doubles and 42 RBIs. A series of tragedies devastated the young ballplayer and derailed his career, causing him to sit out all but 22 games in 1913 (while still hitting a career-best .289). He would miss the entire 1914 season before attempting an unsuccessful 23-game comeback in 1915 as a member of the Federal League’s Chicago Whales. Hauser was a career .238 batter with six home runs, 137 RBIs, 180 runs, and 349 hits.

Considered a power hitter during the Deadball Era, southpaw Beals Becker broke into the majors at age 21 after five seasons in the minors. A three-sport star in school, Becker excelled in football, basketball and certainly baseball. He was honored for his achievements in 1903 with the Wentworth Champion Athlete Award. As a Major Leaguer, Becker played for five different teams over his eight -year career, mostly as a part-time player getting platooned against lefties. From an offensive standpoint, his best year was in 1914, when he batted a robust .325, led the league in singles, and went yard nine times. As a matter of fact, on June 9, 1913 Becker hit two inside–the–park homers against his former team, the Cincinnati Reds, just four days after being traded to the Phillies. He was in the top 10 in home runs on four different occasions, and played in three World Series: 1911 and 1912 for the Giants, and 1915 for the Phillies. An average fielder, Becker had a fairly good arm and was always a positive presence in the clubhouse. He was known to play better on the road than under the close scrutiny of the fans at home. Beals Becker was one of those players who added value to a team coming off the bench because he could do a little of everything. Both as a schoolboy star at Wentworth Military Academy and as a pro, Becker always set the example as a consummate team player. After his Major League days Becker, like many others, went back to the Minor Leagues where he played for Kansas City in the American Association for seven seasons. He then spent 1924 and 1925 between three teams in the Pacific Coast League before retiring from the game. The only graduate to play in the Major Leagues, Becker was inducted into the Wentworth Military Academy Athletic Hall of Fame in 2000.

Bayard “Bud” Sharpe had two tours with Boston’s National League franchise. The first was his rookie season in 1905, when he hit .182 for the Beaneaters in 170 at bats. He then returned to the minors, and played mostly for the Newark Indians of the Eastern League until the Pirates signed him in 1910. Pittsburgh traded him to the NL Boston Doves after just 4 games. Sharpe hit .239 for Boston with 14 doubles and 29 RBI in 439 at bats that year before returning to the minors as team captain of the Eastern League’s Buffalo Bisons. He then went on to manage the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific League, leading them to their first pennant. In his 6-year minor league career, Sharpe played 761 games, won two pennants, and was considered a fielding leader at first base. Plagued by ill heath throughout his career, Sharpe died of tuberculosis in 1916 at age 34.

MLB Pitching Record: 92–117 ERA: 2.63 Teams: St. Louis Browns AL (September 10, 1880 - May 24, 1939) Washington Senators AL (1912) Barney Pelty’s nickname, “The Yiddish Curver,” reflected the two most notable aspects of Pelty’s career. He was one of the first Jewish major leaguers, and he possessed a very impressive curveball, which helped him amass 92 big league wins over ten seasons. In 1906, he went 16–11 with a 1.59 ERA, good for second in the league. The following year, with just a 2.59 ERA, Pelty led the league in losses with 21. His career 2.63 ERA indicates that his .440 career-winning percentage is the result of his mound address. Of his 117 losses, the Browns were shut out in 32 of them, and Pelty won 22 of his 92 wins by shutout. After his playing career ended in 1912 he coached baseball and football and did some scouting. He was also a businessman and alderman in Farmington.

Several things are memorable about the career of pitcher Bill Bailey, but unfortunately, almost none of those things would be considered pleasant memories. Most notably, Bailey established a major-league record by experiencing 10 consecutive losing seasons in his 11-year career. Even among the group of pitchers known as 20-game losers, Bailey might be considered something of an overachiever: He was saddled with the 20-loss label once in the Federal League and twice in the minor leagues. It would be easy to overstate Bailey’s struggles as a professional pitcher, but he was largely a victim of dumb luck, having to spend much of his career on poor teams, and pitching in an era where a complete game was the norm.

Bill Carrigan and Terry Francona will forever be remembered as the only two managers in Red Sox history to date to win two World Series titles with Boston. A native of Lewiston, Maine, Carrigan came up to the Red Sox out of Holy Cross College, where he was converted from infield to catcher by future Hall of Famer, Tommy McCarthy. Nicknamed “Rough” because of his ability to block the plate with his body, Carrigan was a steady hitter and excellent defensively. He played on the 1912 Red Sox Championship team, and in July 1913 the 29-year-old Carrigan took over the helm after manager Jake Stahl was fired. As player-manager, he led the Sox to a second-place finish in 1914, and then won back-to-back World Series in 1915 and 1916. Well-respected throughout the league as both a fiery competitor and student of the game, Carrigan’s leadership skills solidified the ball club. He was instrumental in convincing Red Sox ownership to acquire Babe Ruth from Baltimore as a pitcher. Although sometimes criticized for not using Ruth primarily as a hitter, Carrigan’s plan was to develop his protégé into a premier pitcher because with Tris Speaker, Duffy Lewis and Harry Hooper, there was no need for Ruth in the outfield. In later years, Ruth maintained that Bill Carrigan was the best manager he ever had. After two wildly successful seasons, Carrigan left baseball in 1916 to spend more time with his young family. He returned to Lewiston to launch a successful career in real estate and banking, but continued to get MLB offers every offseason. Carrigan was finally lured back to manage the Red Sox in 1927 but had no success. After finishing in eighth place three years in a row, Carrigan returned to his banking career in Maine. A member of the Holy Cross Hall of Fame and the Red Sox Hall of Fame, Carrigan will be remembered for his tough but cerebral approach to the game.

Bobby Wallace was the first great defensive shortstop in baseball, and perhaps the first player to field his way into the Hall of Fame. He redefined infield play by refining the process of fielding and throwing a grounder, diminishing the role of the infield hit in the early game. In 1902, after the AL Browns lured him away from the NL Cardinals for a 5-year contract worth a staggering (for the times) $32,000, Wallace fielded 17 chances in a game—still the American League record today. He became the player/manager for the Browns for two seasons, going 57–134. After retiring, Wallace played and managed in the minors for 2 years, umpired in the American League for 2 years, then managed the Reds for 25 games, going 5–20. Bobby Wallace was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1953.

Bristol Robotham Lord (September 21, 1883 - November 13, 1964) was traded back to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1910 in what was later deemed as one of the most lopsided deals in Major League history as the mediocre outfielder was swapped virtually straight up for Shoeless Joe Jackson – owner of the third highest career batting average in MLB history (.356). Bris was a promising outfielder who was snatched and signed from the fields around Philadelphia after the Athletics everyday centerfielder was injured. Lord was a capable hitter and fielder and helped the A’s win their second American League pennant and reach the World Series against the New York Giants. He played three years in Philly (1905-1907) and a year and a half with the Cleveland Naps (1909-1910) before returning to Philadelphia (1910-1912) in the Shoeless Joe trade. Legendary Hall of Fame manager and owner Connie Mack declared that Lord’s return helped the A’s charge back to win the American League pennants in 1910 and 1911, despite the fact that the young Shoeless Joe hit .408 in his rookie campaign with 233 hits, 41 stolen bases and 83 RBI. In 1910 and 1911, Bris batted .280 and 3.10, respectively, and did help that Philadelphia win back-to-back World Series titles – the first two in franchise history. Lord played his final season with the Boston Braves of the National League (1913). Bris Lord ended his career with a .256 career batting average, 707 hits, 380 runs and 236 RBI. He also had a .957 fielding percentage.

Voted by the Pittsburgh fans as the greatest right-handed pitcher in Pirates history, Deacon Phillippe may have been the greatest control pitcher ever — his 1.25 walks per nine innings is the lower ratio of anyone who hurled after the modern pitching distance was established in 1893. Longtime teammate Honus Wagner recalled that Phillippe "wanted to hurl against the other team's best pitcher and often worked out of turn to do it." Although he was a six-time 20-game winner, never had a losing season, and won 189 games in a 13-year major league career that didn't begin until he was nearly 27 years old, he is best remembered as the as the winning pitcher in the first modern World Series game.

A talented infielder, Buck Herzog played second base, shortstop and third. He is included with the Cracker Jack second sackers because he played a few more games at that position than the other two. Herzog goes down in the annals of baseball history as one of the most colorful and controversial players of all time. Displaying a fiery temper both as a player and manager, Buck is often compared to former player and manager for the Yankees, Billy Martin. Incredibly versatile at any infield position, Herzog was also a pretty good hitter. He batted .290 in 1911, helping the Giants to the pennant. As a Giant, Herzog and his manager, the legendary John McGraw, often tangled with each other. Their relationship was similar to that of Martin and his star, Reggie Jackson. Herzog, like Jackson, was the anchor on those great pennant-winning Giants teams of 1911, 1912, 1913 and 1917. As a matter of fact, Herzog was dealt away on two occasions only to be brought back to shore up the Giants’ infield. As player-manager of the Reds, Herzog consistently fought with the front office, but despite his fiery temper the Giants wanted him back and named him captain upon his return. One of the greatest brawls of all time took place between Herzog and Ty Cobb when Cobb slid into third with spikes high and injured Herzog. The two battled on the field and, after the game, they continued the fight in Cobb’s hotel room. Cobb proceeded to thrash Herzog soundly. On a couple of occasions there was speculation that Herzog had been laying down on games where money was wagered. The most serious accusation was in 1920 while he was with the Cubs. Although there was no evidence of his participation, Herzog was released with several other accused teammates. Herzog went on to play and manage in the minors through 1924. He later coached at the Naval Academy and worked for the B&O Railroad for many years. In 1953 Herzog’s baseball friends found out that he was penniless, homeless, and sick with tuberculosis. Although they tried to help, it was too late. Herzog died that year at the age of 67. A sad ending to a good player.

Charley O’Leary played in the majors from 1904 to 1934—sort of. He really played only from 1904 to 1913, but in 1934, when he was 51, the St. Louis Browns called him out of retirement. In a pinch-hitting appearance, he stroked a single and later scored a run. Prior to that, he was a weak-hitting shortstop with a good glove who started for the Tigers and later became a good utility player. During the off-season, he had a zany vaudeville act with his teammate Germany Schaefer, which was quite popular. He managed the Indianapolis Indians in the American Association and the San Antonio Bronchos in the Texas League before coaching for the Yankees under Miller Huggins in the 1920s for all those great Ruth–Gehrig championship teams. He went on to coach the Cubs and the Browns before being called back to play in 1934.

Charlie “Eagle Eye” Hemphill was the first right fielder in Boston Red Sox franchise history. A solid gutsy player, he played for six different teams during his 11-year MLB career. In 1902, his best year offensively, he batted .308 between St. Louis and Cleveland. Hemphill had another good year in 1908, batting .297 for New York and stealing 42 bases. He managed to bang out 1,230 hits over his MLB career and had 421 RBI. A strong defensive player, he had 320 putouts for St. Louis in 1907. Hemphill managed the Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association in 1912 and continued to play outfield in the minors through 1915, finishing with a .308 batting average for his five minor league seasons. One of his brothers, Frank Hemphill, also played outfield in the majors for the White Sox and the Senators.

Charlie “Eagle Eye” Hemphill was the first right fielder in Boston Red Sox franchise history. A solid gutsy player, he played for six different teams during his 11-year MLB career. In 1902, his best year offensively, he batted .308 between St. Louis and Cleveland. Hemphill had another good year in 1908, batting .297 for New York and stealing 42 bases. He managed to bang out 1,230 hits over his MLB career and had 421 RBI. A strong defensive player, he had 320 putouts for St. Louis in 1907. Hemphill managed the Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association in 1912 and continued to play outfield in the minors through 1915, finishing with a .308 batting average for his five minor league seasons. One of his brothers, Frank Hemphill, also played outfield in the majors for the White Sox and the Senators.

Charlie “Eagle Eye” Hemphill was the first right fielder in Boston Red Sox franchise history. A solid gutsy player, he played for six different teams during his 11-year MLB career. In 1902, his best year offensively, he batted .308 between St. Louis and Cleveland. Hemphill had another good year in 1908, batting .297 for New York and stealing 42 bases. He managed to bang out 1,230 hits over his MLB career and had 421 RBI. A strong defensive player, he had 320 putouts for St. Louis in 1907. Hemphill managed the Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association in 1912 and continued to play outfield in the minors through 1915, finishing with a .308 batting average for his five minor league seasons. One of his brothers, Frank Hemphill, also played outfield in the majors for the White Sox and the Senators.

American Indian. Innovator. Renaissance man. Charles Albert “Chief” Bender lived a unique American life, fashioned a Hall of Fame career, and was an important member of modern baseball’s first dynasty. He silently struggled against racial prejudice, became a student of the game, and was a lifetime baseball man. His legacy, however, is less nuanced than all of that. Bender is known foremost for a rare ability to pitch under pressure. “If I had all the men I’ve ever handled, and they were in their prime, and there was one game I wanted to win above all others,” said Philadelphia Athletics icon Connie Mack, who managed fellow all-time pitching greats Lefty Grove, Herb Pennock, Eddie Plank, and Rube Waddell, “Albert would be my man.”

Because of his slight build he wasn’t taken seriously as a catcher at first, but Charles “Red” Dooin eventually enjoyed a stellar career as a Major League catcher. After attending Xavier University, Dooin worked as a tailor while playing the Minor League circuit in the late 1890s and finally got into the big leagues in 1902 with the Phillies. Although he was very small in stature, Dooin proved to be tough at the plate and was not afraid to mix it up with base sliders. Unfortunately, this resulted in a broken ankle in 1910 and a broken leg in 1911. When he was not injured, the feisty redhead was a steady, competent catcher who excelled at working with pitchers. Offensively, he was a marginal hitter, although he did manage to bat .328 in 1911 for the Phils with 247 at-bats. Dooin took over as skipper of the Phillies in 1910. As player-manager, he led them to second place in 1913, and had an overall winning record north of .500. He is credited with developing future Hall of Fame pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander, who had a fantastic rookie year in 1911. One of the early innovators of the game, Dooin was the first to wear lightweight, paper-mache shin guards under his stockings to prevent his legs from being slashed by spikes. Although Roger Bresnahan is credited with the invention, Dooin maintained that Bresnahan learned of the idea when he slid into home and collided with Dooin’s reinforced stockings. Bresnahan developed the idea into padded shin guards worn over his stockings that he removed when not catching, whereas Dooin wore his shin guards throughout the game. After injuries put an end to his career Dooin became a successful businessman, only to lose everything when the stock market crashed. In the offseason as a player, Dooin sang and acted in vaudeville. After his business ventures failed, his baritone voice came to the rescue and he enjoyed a lucrative career in vaudeville and on the radio. Player, manager, inventor, entertainer...Red Dooin was a very interesting guy.

In the time when Giants walked the earth and roamed the Polo Grounds, none was more honored than Christy Mathewson. Delivering all four of his pitches, including his famous "fadeaway" (now called a screwball), with impeccable control and an easy motion, the right-handed Mathewson was the greatest pitcher of the Deadball Era's first decade, compiling a 2.13 ERA over 17 seasons and setting modern National League records for wins in a season (37), wins in a career (373), and consecutive 20-win seasons (12). Aside from his pitching achievements, he was the greatest all-around hero of the Deadball Era, a handsome, college-educated man who lifted the rowdy world of baseball to gentlemanliness. Matty was the basis, many say, for the idealized athlete Frank Merriwell, an inspiration to many authors over the years, and the motivation for an Off-Broadway play based on his life and writings. "He gripped the imagination of a country that held a hundred million people and held this grip with a firmer hold than any man of his day or time," wrote sportswriter Grantland Rice.1

Some referred to him as “Deerfoot,” while others called him “Milan the Marvel.” Call him what you want, Clyde Milan was a darn good baseball player. Over his 16 years with the Senators, Milan batted a tidy .285 with 2,100 hits, and perfected the fine art of base stealing. When you talk about the best robbers during that era, Milan was right up there with Ty Cobb and Eddie Collins. In 1912 he set a Major League record with 88 steals, which stood until Cobb broke it three years later. Milan got his start beating the bushes in 1905 and 1906 with stops in Clarksville, Texas, and Shawnee, Oklahoma, before making it to Wichita, Kansas, in the Western Association. When the Senators called him up to the big leagues, Milan played sparingly for a few seasons. It all finally clicked in 1910 when he batted .279 followed by a 1911 season in which he batted a robust .315. From that point on, Clyde Milan established himself as a solid player who could hit, field and run. Perfecting the hook slide, “Deerfoot” went on to steal 495 bases over his career. That is not anywhere near Cobb’s record, but very is good nonetheless. Milan had some very good seasons over his long career. He averaged 30 stolen bases per year and was always productive offensively. In 1920, he batted .322 with 163 hits. Like many others at the time, Milan returned to the minors for several years before hanging them up. He went on to manage in the minors through 1937. Milan returned to the Senators to scout in 1937 and coached for them from 1938 until his death. One scorching day in 1953, Clyde Milan suffered a heart attack after hitting fungoes to his infielders. He passed away three weeks later. “Milan the Marvel” was robbed of life as quickly as he robbed those bases.

Danny Murphy was both a very good second baseman as well as outfielder. We include him with our second sackers because he played the better part of his career at that position. Considered a power hitter, Murphy had some very good offensive years. On August 25, 1910, he hit for the cycle, an extremely difficult feat for that era, and in 1911 he batted a lofty .329 with 167 hits. That year Murphy played the outfield position and led the league in assists. Prior to his lengthy A’s career, Danny spent two Major League seasons playing for the Giants in the National League. Murphy’s contract was purchased by Connie Mack and he made his debut for the A’s on July 8, 1902, going 6-for-6 with a home run. Not a bad start. Mack had nullified Hall of Famer Nap Lajoie’s contract and replaced him at second base with Murphy. Pretty big shoes to fill. Ironically, in 1908, the 31-year-old Murphy was moved from second to outfield to make room for another Hall of Famer, the young Eddie Collins. Murphy was named captain of the team, graciously accepted his move to the outfield, and mentored young Collins. He developed into a skilled outfielder and his .977 and .974 fielding percentage in 1909 and 1910 were good for second in the league. Unfortunately in 1912 Murphy suffered a serious knee injury which hampered him defensively, although he continued to flourish with his bat. He finished his career in the Federal League and went on to manage and coach in both the majors and minors. Murphy played on two World Series Champion teams (1910, 1911) as well as two pennant winners (1902, 1905). Danny Murphy was one of those ballplayers who did his job every day with no fanfare and was a credit to the game.

David William Shean (July 9, 1883 - May 22, 1963) had the unfortunate luck of coming up with the Philadelphia Athletics while long-time second bagger Danny Murphy was manning the base, but then fell further down the depth chart when also signed with the A’s in 1906. The Fordham University graduate played only one year for Connie Mack and the A’s before he was shipped to the cross-town Phillies of the National League. Shean was the atypical middle infielder with respectable defensive ability, but his skill at the plate made him a better than average player with a keen understanding of the game, especially during the Deadball Era. Dave was primarily a singles hitter, but he had no qualms about sacrificing players into scoring position, even leading the league in sacrifice hits un 1918 with 36. Shean played nine seasons on Major League ball with the A’s (1906), the Phillies (1908-1909), the Boston Braves (1909-1910, 1912), the Chicago Cubs (1911), the Cincinnati Reds (1917) and the Boston Red Sox (1918-1919). Though his batting average (.239) did not necessarily reflect it, Dave’s best year statistically was 1910 when he played a career-high 150 games and enjoyed other highs with 130 hits, 52 runs and 36 RBI. In 1918, Shean was the everyday second baseman for the World Series champion Red Sox, but he only offered four hits and a .211 BA during the Fall Classic. Dave Shean retired after the 1919 season having collected 495 hits, 225 runs and 166 RBI in 630 Major League games. He also had a .959 career fielding percentage.

David William Shean (July 9, 1883 - May 22, 1963) had the unfortunate luck of coming up with the Philadelphia Athletics while long-time second bagger Danny Murphy was manning the base, but then fell further down the depth chart when also signed with the A’s in 1906. The Fordham University graduate played only one year for Connie Mack and the A’s before he was shipped to the cross-town Phillies of the National League. Shean was the atypical middle infielder with respectable defensive ability, but his skill at the plate made him a better than average player with a keen understanding of the game, especially during the Deadball Era. Dave was primarily a singles hitter, but he had no qualms about sacrificing players into scoring position, even leading the league in sacrifice hits un 1918 with 36. Shean played nine seasons on Major League ball with the A’s (1906), the Phillies (1908-1909), the Boston Braves (1909-1910, 1912), the Chicago Cubs (1911), the Cincinnati Reds (1917) and the Boston Red Sox (1918-1919). Though his batting average (.239) did not necessarily reflect it, Dave’s best year statistically was 1910 when he played a career-high 150 games and enjoyed other highs with 130 hits, 52 runs and 36 RBI. In 1918, Shean was the everyday second baseman for the World Series champion Red Sox, but he only offered four hits and a .211 BA during the Fall Classic. Dave Shean retired after the 1919 season having collected 495 hits, 225 runs and 166 RBI in 630 Major League games. He also had a .959 career fielding percentage.

Named after the Greek god of love and a Venezuelan hero, Eros Bolivar “Cy” Barger never made it to baseball hero status. Although he had a lifetime pitching record that fell below the .500 mark, Barger was not all that bad. With a 15-year career spread between the Minor Leagues and the majors, Barger certainly had some bright spots. Coming out of Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, he first played pro ball in the New York State League in 1905, where it was quickly determined that Barger would be better suited as a pitcher. The following year he was 16–8 pitching for Lancaster in the Tri-State League and soon made it up to the New York Highlanders. Needing a little more seasoning, Barger went back to the minors to post some good seasons in the Eastern League with both his arm and his bat. In 1909 he won 23 games for the Rochester Bronchos, along with a tidy 1.00 earned-run average. He also had some success as a hitter with a .319 season one year and several where he batted north of .240. When Barger got back into the majors again in 1910, he won 15 games for Brooklyn followed by an 11-win season. After going 17–9 for the International League’s Newark Indians in 1913, Barger jumped back to the majors to pitch for the Pittsburgh Rebels of the newly formed Federal League. There, in 1915, he led the league in games finished with 19, and fielding percentage as pitcher with 1.00. After the Federal League folded, Barger was player-manager of the Memphis Chickasaws in the Southern Association through 1919 and, in 1921, he managed the St. Petersburg Saints in the Florida State League before retiring to his home state of Kentucky.

Pittsburgh Pirates NL (1902–1904, 1906–1908) Cincinnati Reds NL (1905–1906) St. Louis Cardinals NL (1909–1910) Brooklyn Dodgers/Superbas NL (1912–1913) Ed “Yaller” Phelps was one of those players that teams love to have on their bench. He was a catcher and first baseman for 11 seasons in the National League. Phelps was very good defensively and had some good seasons behind the plate. A steady .251 lifetime hitter, he batted .282 in 1903 and always managed to get his bat on the ball. During his first stint with the Pirates, Phelps played in the 1903 World Series and batted .231 in 26 at bats. After his tour in Brooklyn he played in the New York State League for the Albany Senators and in the Western League for the Sioux City Indians. He retired in 1915 with a .261 minor league batting average when he was 36 years old. In 1930 he helped found the Albany Twilight League in his hometown, an amateur league that is still active.

Before his death in 1961, Ed Reulbach held the distinction of being the last living Cub to have won a World Series. He joined the Cubbies in 1905 and quickly impressed with 18 wins and an ERA of 1.42. The following year, he contributed 19 wins to a league-leading 1.75 team ERA which earned the Cubs a trip to the World Series. In the Fall Classic, Reulbach pitched a complete game one-hitter, but the Cubs fell to the crosstown rival White Sox in six games. He was the National League win-loss percentage leader for three seasons (1906–1908) and enjoyed two winning streaks of 14 games or more. On September 26, 1908, “Big Ed” Reulbach surpassed these impressive accomplishments with one that may never be duplicated. He pitched two complete game shutouts in one day against the Brooklyn Superbas. Sadly, 97 wins and two World Series Championships in his first five seasons were not enough to get Reulbach to Cooperstown. In 1910, his ERA rose while his innings pitched tumbled. That season, his only child became seriously ill with diphtheria and Reulbach missed multiple games to be with his son. His career would last another seven seasons with stops in Brooklyn, Boston, and the Newark Pepper of the Federal League. During the latter part of his career, Reulbach helped found the Baseball Players’ Fraternity to help fight for higher player salaries, and he even tried to convince MLB players to abstain from alcohol. After his retirement, he nearly sacrificed his own well-being to care for his sickly son, who passed away in 1931. The accomplishments of fellow Cub pitcher Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown were more notable, but “Big Ed” Reulbach was a big part of the Cubs’ successful run in the early years of the 20th century.

More remembered for scandals than sliders, Ed Cicotte was one of the nastiest men to ever toss the horsehide. Aptly nicknamed “Knuckles,” the fiery Cicotte became notorious as one of the eight Chicago White Sox players who threw the 1919 World Series. Before his socks turned black, Cicotte was a devastating hurler. In a 14-year career, he posted an ERA of under 2.00 five times. This frugality was mixed with ferocity as Knuckles whiffed over 100 batters in a season eight times. Cicotte was little more than a .500 pitcher in four and a half seasons with the Red Sox. He continued that trend after being sold to Chicago in 1912. Things changed in 1916 as the 32-year-old Cicotte went 15–7 with a 1.78 ERA. It was a sign of things to come. He broke out in 1917, leading the American League with 28 wins, a 1.53 ERA, and a Herculean 346.2 innings pitched. In the 1917 World Series, Cicotte was 1–1 with 13 Ks and an ERA of 1.57 as Chicago beat the Giants in six games. In that Series, Cicotte surrendered 23 hits in 23 innings pitched. In fact, he gave up a nearly 3,000 hits in his career, but allowed just over 1,100 runs. Cicotte was 29–7 in that fateful 1919 season and 1–2 in the tainted World Series loss. He would win 21 games in his final season of 1920 before being banned for life by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Ultimately, Cicotte’s legacy of awesome pitching is forever tarnished by awful decision-making.

Besides batting over .300 four different times, Ed had 255 stolen bases and a spectacular fielding percentage of .990, superb numbers. He once had 10 consecutive hits over a three-game period. The epitome of a dedicated ballplayer, Konetchy was well-liked and respected by teammates and opponents. He had some great seasons in the minors after his MLB tour. While playing for the Fort Worth Panthers in 1925, he led the Texas League with 41 homers. After his playing days, Konetchy returned home to manage the La Crosse team and won the Wisconsin State League championship in 1940. He later went into the restaurant business, the chicken farm business, and scouted for the Cardinals.

An excellent place-hitter, slick fielder, and brainy baserunner, Eddie Collins epitomized the style of play that made the Deadball Era unique. At the plate, the 5-foot-9, 175-pound left-handed batter possessed a sharp batting eye, and aimed to hit outside pitches to the opposite field and trick deliveries back through the box. Once on base, Collins was a master at stealing, even though his foot speed wasn't particularly noteworthy. A believer in the principle that a runner steals off the pitcher and not the catcher, Collins practiced the art of studying pitchers – how they held the ball for certain pitches, how they looked off runners, all the pitcher’s moves. He focused especially on the feet and hips of the pitcher, rather than just his hands, and thus was able to take large leads off first base and get excellent jumps. An Ivy League graduate, Collins was one of the smartest players of his day, and he knew it. Saddled with the nickname “Cocky” from early in his career, Collins drew the resentment of teammates for his self-confidence and good breeding that at times seemed as though it belonged more in a ballroom than a baseball clubhouse. Perhaps for this reason, contradiction and complexity became a recurring theme throughout his 25-year major-league career. He made his major-league debut under an alias and later served as captain of the most infamous team in baseball history, the 1919 Chicago White Sox. He won an award recognizing him as the most valuable player in the league, only to be sold off to another club in the subsequent offseason. Despite his upper-class origins and education, Collins abided by a litany of superstitions, although he insisted he was “not superstitious, just thought it unlucky not to get base hits.”

Ed “Eggie” Lennox’s biggest claim to major league fame may be that he spent 24 games as the third baseman to the famous “Tinker to Evers to Chance” double-play trio with the Cubs in 1912. He was spelling Heinie Zimmerman, even though it was Harry Steinfieldt who played third base for the Cubs in 1910 when “Baseball’s Sad Lexicon was written. After four nondescript seasons in the American League and National League, he returned to the minors for a year. Lennox then joined the Pittsburgh Rebels in the Federal League, where he found his groove. He hit .312 with 11 homers, 84 RBI, and 19 stolen bases, finished in the top five in the league in on-base percentage, slugging percentage, home runs, and walks, and finished eighth in RBI. Sandwiched between his MLB tours, he spent eight seasons in the minors, playing mostly for the Rochester Bronchos in the Eastern League and the Louisville Colonels in the American Association. Lennox retired from the game in 1916 as a .274 minor league career hitter.

For someone who participated in only 855 major-league games spread over nine seasons, Ed Abbaticchio has had more questions raised about his life than most baseball fans might expect. Was he the first Italian American big leaguer? Was he the first professional dual-sport athlete? Was he the creator of the spiral punt? Why did he temporarily retire from Organized Baseball after the 1905 season? Why did the Pittsburgh Pirates trade three veteran players for him on December 11, 1906, when he had not seen any action in the majors or minors since October 7, 1905? Did he receive a higher salary than Honus Wagner in 1907? How did he become part of an urban legend? And how is his last name pronounced? But the answers to these questions are what give shape and color to Abbaticchio’s life, a life as diverse as it was fascinating.

Frank M. Schulte was the slugging right fielder for the great Chicago Cubs teams of 1906-10. After his first start on September 21, 1904, "Wildfire" remained with the Windy City club until 1916, and outlasted the likes of Mordecai Brown, Frank Chance, Johnny Evers, and Joe Tinker, who by the end of Schulte's days in Chicago, was managing the club.

Floyd Myron “Rube” Kroh Born: August 25, 1886 - Friendship, NY Died: March 17, 1944 - New Orleans, LA Batted: LH Threw: LH Position: P MLB Pitching Record: 14–9 ERA: 2.20 Teams: Boston Americans/Red Sox AL (1906–1907) Chicago Cubs NL (1909–1910) Boston Braves NL (1912) Maverick southpaw Floyd “Rube” Kroh’s best year was 1909, when he went 9–4 for the Cubs. However, he was benched for most of the 1910 season for insubordination. Besides curfew violations, he violated his contract by pitching an illegal game for a New Jersey team, after which the Cubs released him. His 2.20 ERA was very good and he could have been a top-notch pitcher if he played by the rules and didn’t fight club management. Kroh had a long minor league career before and after his MLB years. He had five 15-win seasons in the minors, posting three of them in the Southern Association for the Nashville Volunteers from 1914 to 1916. He enlisted in the army in 1917 and was injured in action in France. Upon his return, Kroh dabbled in the minors until 1922, but several operations on his right leg, injured in the war, did not succeed in returning him to good playing shape. Unable to play well, he stayed in baseball as an umpire in the minors.

Frank Leroy Chance (September 9, 1877 - September 15, 1924) was a key member of the turn-of-the-century Chicago Cubs as player manager winning four National League Championships from 1906-1910, winning two World Series titles (1907, 1908). He earned the nickname “The Peerless Leader” as a strict manager who required his players to “do it my way or we meet after the game and let our fists decide who is right.” The rough-and-tumble Frank Chance led by example, leading the National League twice in stolen bases (1903, 1906). During his 17-year career with the Chicago Cubs (1898-1912) and the New York Yankees (1913-1914), Chance hit .298 with 1,273 hits and 405 stolen bases. The Chicago Cubs 116 win total during the 1906 campaign remains a Major League record. The Veterans Committee elected Frank Leroy Chance to the National Baseball

In the annals of the Red Sox/Yankees rivalry, there aren’t too many players who started with New York, then played for Boston, and then played for New York again. Frank LaPorte wasn’t the only one, but he was the first. He was a stocky man, 5-feet-8 and weighing 175 pounds. LaPorte played second base, third base, and the outfield, batting and throwing right-handed. After bouncing back and forth between the two teams, he also played for the St. Louis Browns and the Washington Nationals, spending nine years in the American League before jumping to the Federal League and then leaving baseball.

Fred Beck was a pretty good power hitter during the dead-ball era. In 1910 he tied for the MLB lead in homers with 10. In 1914, while playing for Joe Tinker’s Chicago team in the Federal League, he went deep another 11 times. At 24 years old, with a very good 1910 season under his belt, he became one of baseball’s first holdouts during the winter of 1910 to 1911. He demanded more money for his performance, and was traded to Cincinnati. Around his time in the majors, Beck had a 16-year minor league career. He played his best years for Wichita in the Western League, batting .332 with 30 home runs in 1920, .324 with 35 homers in 1921, and .317 with 38 homers in 1924 at age 37. After 1,756 minor league games with 6,417 at bats, 166 home runs, and a .292 minor league career batting average, Beck retired in 1926.

Fred Clifford Clarke Born: October 3, 1872 - Winterset, IA Died: August 14, 1960 - Winfield, KS Batted: LH Threw: RH Position: OF Career BA: .312 Managerial Record: 1,602–1,181 Teams: Louisville Colonels NL (1894–1896; player-manager: 1897–1899) Pittsburgh Pirates NL (player-manager: 1900–1911, 1913–1915; manager: 1912) Hall of Famer Fred Clarke was a successful player-manager from 1897 to 1915. His playing career began with a bang in 1894 as Clarke went 5-for-5 playing for the Louisville Colonels. The following season, he proved to be no fluke with 191 hits, 82 RBI, and a .347 batting average. Clarke’s numbers dipped slightly in 1896, but he still batted .325 with 79 RBI. Sadly, the Colonels were perennial losers, finishing no higher than ninth in Clarke’s six seasons. In 1900, Clarke jumped from the sinking Louisville barge to a Pittsburgh Pirate ship as player-manager. The move would forever cement his baseball legacy. After a second place finish in 1900, Clarke’s Bucs won three straight National League pennants, and Clarke hit .324, .316, and .351 respectively. In 1903, he led the league in doubles, slugging, and OPS. Ever the patient hitter, Clarke frequently recorded twice as many walks as strikeouts. In 1899, he had just 17 Ks in 606 at-bats. Clarke would spend 15 seasons in Pittsburgh, but undoubtedly, his favorite year was 1909. That season, the Pirates won 110 games and Clarke, at age 36, was still impressive at the plate with 68 RBI, a .287 batting average, and a league-leading 80 walks. With a lineup that featured Honus Wagner, and a mound staff with two 20-game winners, Vic Willis and Howie Camnitz, Pittsburgh won the NL pennant and played Ty Cobb’s Detroit Tigers in the World Series. Clarke hit just .211 in the Series, but the Pirates prevailed in seven games. Known for his carousing at an early age, Clarke matured into a fearless skipper whose managerial strategy was unmatched. He was also a shrewd entrepreneur, earning millions in various business ventures. After retiring in 1915, Clarke returned to the Pirates in 1925 as an executive and assistant to the manager. He helped Pittsburgh win another world championship that season, but his presence undermined manager Bill McKechnie’s power and he retired for good in 1926. Fred Clarke was truly one of the game’s great leaders, on the diamond, at the helm, and in life.

Frederic William Olmstead (July 3, 1881 – October 22, 1936) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played for the Chicago White Sox from 1908 to 1911.

Detroit Tigers AL Chicago White Sox AL (1909–1911) Used as both an outfielder and a catcher, Fred Payne drifted between the minors and majors over his 16-year career. Starting with the Syracuse Stars in the New York State League, he was a decent hitter, always hovering around the .260 mark. Once he got to the big leagues, he did not fare as well, hitting as high as .270 and as low as .067. He did get 4 at bats in the 1907 World Series, and got his only major league homer in 1911, his final season in the big leagues. Payne then went back to play 6 years in the minors, and had some pretty good seasons for the Baltimore Orioles in the Eastern/International League and the Ottawa Senators in the Canadian League. He returned to the Syracuse Stars as manager and then managed the Newport News Shipbuilders in the Virginia League. He retired in 1917 at age 36 with a .251 minor league batting average.

Indiana native Cecil “George” Ferguson had a respectable 11–11 season with the Boston Braves in 1908 with a 2.47 ERA, but then he injured his arm, effectively snuffing out a promising career. The following season Ferguson had 30 starts and appeared in 36 games, going 5–23 with a 3.73 ERA. He led the National League in losses that year, and finished second-worst in earned runs allowed. He pitched just 147 innings after that season and was out of the majors 2 years later. Ferguson did try the minors but without success. He pitched a 1–6 season for the Venice Tigers in the Pacific Coast League and then left baseball after the 1913 season when he was 29 years old.

Indiana native Cecil “George” Ferguson had a respectable 11–11 season with the Boston Braves in 1908 with a 2.47 ERA, but then he injured his arm, effectively snuffing out a promising career. The following season Ferguson had 30 starts and appeared in 36 games, going 5–23 with a 3.73 ERA. He led the National League in losses that year, and finished second-worst in earned runs allowed. He pitched just 147 innings after that season and was out of the majors 2 years later. Ferguson did try the minors but without success. He pitched a 1–6 season for the Venice Tigers in the Pacific Coast League and then left baseball after the 1913 season when he was 29 years old.

Nicknamed for his constant chatter behind the plate, Charles “Gabby” Street was Walter Johnson’s catcher for four seasons. He was also famous for one of the more entertaining feats in baseball history, catching a ball dropped from the Washington Monument in 1908. A good defensive catcher with a weak bat, he played for several teams but was more famous as a manager. Also known as “The Old Sarge,” he led the Cards to two pennants in 1930 and 1931 and a World Series championship in 1931. Street also managed in the minors for 13 years for eight teams in five leagues, winning the Western Association championship with his 1922 Joplin Miners. After years managing in the minors and the majors, he ended up in the broadcast booth, where he excelled as a color commentator for the Cards. He mentored the young Harry Caray, and worked until his death in 1951.

A versatile player, George “Peaches” Graham was predominantly a catcher, but also played first, second, and third base, shortstop, and outfield during his seven major league seasons. He even pitched 1 game for Chicago in 1903, giving up 3 runs in five innings. Graham’s most productive season offensively was 1910, when he batted .282 with 82 hits. In his final season in the majors, he gave up 9 stolen bases in a game against the Giants. Between the Cubs and the Doves, Graham played for the Minneapolis Millers in the American Association. After his MLB days, he continued on in the minors through 1916, wrapping up with a .253 batting average in 3,949 minor league at bats over 12 seasons. His son, John “Jack” Graham, played with the Dodgers, the Giants, and the Browns from 1946 to 1949.

George “Farmer” Bell was a hard-luck pitcher who played for some really lousy Brooklyn teams. Bell was 32 years old when he came up to the majors, after going 23–16 for the Tri-State League’s Altoona Mountaineers in 1906. His MLB career 2.85 ERA indicates that Bell was actually a good pitcher. His best year was 1909, when he went 16–15 for a team that was 55–98. In 1910,Bell went 10–27 to lead the league in losses, but his ERA was an excellent 2.64. After his MLB days, he pitched in the minors for 5 more years, 3 of them for the Newark Indians of the International League. Bell retired in 1915 at age 40 with a seven-season minor league record of 56–42.

eorge “Dode” Paskert carved out a solid 15-year MLB career, wowing fans and peers alike with his tremendous outfield range and overall speed. Known as an elite defensive player, he was underrated as a hitter. Paskert made several appearances on the offensive leader boards, highlighted by his .315 average in 1912, good for ninth in the National League. He finished in the top ten in runs six times, doubles four times, hits twice, RBI once, and he even finished sixth in home runs in 1916 with 8. He stole 293 career bases and finished 14th in NL MVP voting in 1912, when he hit .315 with 102 runs, 43 RBI, and 36 stolen bases. In 1917, at the age of 35, the Cubs traded home run champ Cy Williams to the Phillies straight up for Paskert. Also known as “Honey Boy” for his sweet ballplaying ability, he continued to play in the minors, mostly for the Columbus Senators in the American Association, until he finally retired in 1927 at the age of 46.

The only left-hander who pitched regularly for John McGraw's New York Giants until Rube Marquard joined the rotation in 1909, George Wiltse was known as "Hooks," not for his ability to curve a baseball, nor for his hooknose, but for his fielding prowess. One story credits Giants catcher Frank Bowerman with saying "that's hooking them" after watching Wiltse use his long right arm to snare shots hit back through the middle, while another says that it was a manager in Syracuse who said Wiltse had hooks for hands after watching him work out at first base. A lean six-footer with deep-set eyes and a wad of tobacco usually in his mouth (he reportedly cost himself a victory in a game against the Cincinnati Reds on June 19, 1905, when he swallowed a quid and suffered an upset stomach), Wiltse won in double figures in each of his first eight seasons with the Giants, compiling a 139-90 record and 2.47 ERA over 12 seasons in the major leagues.

Born: September 3, 1876 - Lost Nation, IA Died: January 3, 1945 - Clinton, IA Batted: LH Threw: LH Position: OF Career BA: .301 Teams: Boston Americans AL (1903) St. Louis Browns AL (1905–1910) For the first 28 years of the American League, the batting title was won by a future Hall of Famer—such as Ty Cobb, Nap Lajoie, Tris Speaker, or Babe Ruth—in every season but one, that is. The 1906 AL batting champion was “Silent George” Stone. He played 2 games for Boston in 1903 before being traded to the Browns the day after Christmas in 1904. Stone hit with an exaggerated crouch, and Boston’s Jimmy Collins felt it would limit his potential. In 1905, however, Stone led the league in hits with 189 and in 1906 he edged Nap Lajoie for the batting title, hitting .358 with 6 homers, 71 RBI, and 35 stolen bases. Stone also led the league that season in on-base percentage (.417) and slugging percentage (.501). He hit .320 in 1907, but after that his play declined sharply. Some say he contracted malaria in 1908, but Stone also suffered ankle and shoulder injuries during his last two seasons. In 1910, at age 33, he played his final MLB season.

Herman “Germany” Schaefer is the only player in MLB history who actually stole first base. While trying to beat the White Sox for the Senators on August 4, 1911, Schaefer was on first and Clyde Milan was on third with the winning run in the ninth. They tried a delayed double steal but catcher Fred Payne did not throw to second to get Schaefer. On the next pitch, Schaefer “stole” first, running back to the base to taunt Payne that he was going to steal second again. He did so on the next pitch but got caught before he could reach second base. Milan ran for home but was not in time to score. The practice was outlawed after that. Known for his pranks and showmanship on the field, Schaefer used humor to rattle the opposing team. It is said that a vaudeville act he performed with Tigers teammate Charley O’Leary was the inspiration for MGM’s Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949) with Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra. Although he was battling pulmonary tuberculosis, Schaefer was hired to scout for the Giants in 1919. Unfortunately he passed away soon after while scouting in upstate New York.

Three time 20-game winner, Howie “Red” Camnitz, enjoyed a pretty good run with the Pirates. The redheaded 22-year-old curveball whiz came up to the Pirates after going 26–7 for Vicksburg in the Cotton States League, but his rookie year was not auspicious. He played in just 10 games, going 1–4 before he was sent back to the minors to learn how to protect his signature pitch. Apparently Camnitz overused the curveball so batters could hit off him easily. After 17 wins in 1905 and 22 in 1906 for the Toledo Mud Hens, Camnitz got the call to rejoin the Pirates. From that point his career took off. He had worked to perfect and protect his out pitch, a big sweeping curveball that would freeze batters in their tracks. In 1909 he posted a sparkling 25–6 record with an anemic 1.62 earned-run average, helping the Pirates to the pennant. Camnitz did not perform well in the Series, and there was speculation that he was either ill or drinking. Whatever it was, it affected his play during the 1910 season, but Camnitz was back in form in 1911 with 20 wins, and followed that with 22 in 1912. A real workhorse, Camnitz threw at least 240 innings per year over a span of seven seasons. By the time he jumped ship to the Pittsburgh Rebels of the Federal League in 1914, he had seen better days as a pitcher. His curveball became erratic, his walks began to soar, and he played out the string as a very mediocre pitcher. Camnitz had a penchant for socializing, and was never in the best of shape, which some believe led to the mediocrity. The Rebels released him early in the 1915 season because of his conditioning, and Camnitz was out of the game for good. He returned home to Kentucky where he had a successful 40-year career in the automotive sales business.

Hal Chase was given careful consideration as the starting first baseman on our Cracker Jack All-Star Team. Although he is one of the most infamous characters to ever wear a baseball uniform, his numbers certainly warrant attention. One of the first stars of baseball, Chase batted over .300 six times, and won the National League batting crown in 1916 with his .339 average. A truly gifted player, Chase was a whiz defensively, pioneering some of the first base techniques that are used today. He perfected the art of playing off the bag and charging weakly hit balls. He also spent hours working on bare-handing and perfecting his sweep motion in order to tag runners out. Offensively “Prince Hal” was a very good hitter whose best year was in the Federal League where he batted .347 playing for Buffalo. There is no doubt that Hal Chase was a great ballplayer. On the other hand, Hal Chase was as corrupt a ballplayer as ever existed. Quite frankly, he became the proverbial “black eye” to the game. During his time in New York, Chase became known as a troublemaker and a show-off. He was well aware of his ability and some say he felt fans were privileged to see him strut his stuff. Chase ran with a fast crowd of Broadway entertainers and gamblers. He thought nothing of betting either on or against his own team throughout his career. In 1918 he was suspended from the Reds for offering bribes to opponents and teammates to fix the outcomes of games he had bet on. After being implicated as a middleman in the 1919 Black Sox scandal, Chase would never again play in the majors. “Prince Hal” lived out his years playing for semi-pro teams and living in obscurity on his sister’s ranch. The game of baseball would have been better off without Hal Chase.

Harry “Hal” Krause had a pretty good but short career in the major leagues. He led the American League with a 1.39 ERA in 1909 and went 18–8 that year. Overall, he had 298 K’s over his five seasons. “Shoeless Joe” Jackson once said that Harry Krause was one of the toughest pitchers he ever faced. He went on to play in the Pacific Coast League for the Portland Beavers and then the Oakland Oaks, where he pitched for 12 seasons. Krause wrapped up his 20-year minor league career in 1929 at age 40 with a 300–249 record. He later managed the Tucson Cowboys in the Arizona-Texas League in 1937 and 1938. He is a member of the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.

Harry McIntire played professional baseball from 1900 through 1913. After spending five years in the minor leagues, he ascended to the major leagues with Brooklyn in 1905. Over the next five seasons McIntire toiled in futility with Brooklyn. In 1910, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs. Though pitching in a diminished role, he had his greatest success there, including making a World Series appearance in 1910. A decent-hitting pitcher and spitball specialist, “Handsome Harry” once pitched no-hit ball for 10? innings before losing 1-0 in 12 innings. More ignominiously, McIntire had the unenviable distinction of losing 20 or more games in a season three times in his career, all with Brooklyn. After baseball, McIntire lived a vagabond life of a professional golfer, scout, gambler, and idle fisherman.

Today Harry Steinfeldt is the answer to a oft-heard trivia question: Who was the third baseman in the Cubs' famous Joe Tinker-to-Johnny Evers-to-Frank Chance infield? In his time, however, the .267 lifetime hitter was considered one of the greatest third basemen in the game. "Harry Steinfeldt, the Cubs third baseman whose glorious fielding kept the dashing Ty Cobb off the base paths in a couple of world's series, and whose lusty wallops sent many a fellow-Cub scampering across home plate in the last few years, is another who was dubbed unfit by an erring leader in ill-fated Cincinnati," wrote Alfred H. Spink in 1910. "Harry left the haunts of the Reds, jumped in and completed Frank Chance's sterling infield, and still holds his court there, a veritable terror to seekers of base hits and stolen cushions."

Harry Meiggs Wolter (July 11, 1884 - July 7, 1970) played 21 games with three different teams in 1907, his rookie season, often serving as a pitcher, though most of his career was spent playing the outfield. He played the 1907 with the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals before being demoted to San Jose of the California League. In 1909, the Boston Red Sox purchased Harry’s contract and he was one of five of the nine “Harrys” in spring training to make the opening day roster. The utility infielder only spent one year in Beantown (1909) before the New York Highlanders snatched him off the waiver wire providing a slot for him for the next four years (1910-1914). He did also pitch in Boston, appearing in 11 games going 4-4 with 21 strikeouts and a 3.51 ERA. Wolter’s best year came in 1911 when he hits .304 with 132 hits, 28 stolen bases and 36 RBI in 122 games. Wolter finished his career in a Chicago Cubs uniform (1917). In 15 games on the mound in his career, Harry went 4-6 with 29 Ks, one complete game and a 3.75 ERA. Harry Wolter ended his Major League career in 1917 having hit .270 with 514 hits, 286 runs and 167 RBI in 588 games. Once he retired from playing, Harry coached the Stanford Cardinal baseball squad off and on for 26 years from 1916 until 1949.

John Franklin “Home Run” Baker Born: March 13, 1886 - Trappe, MD Died: June 28, 1963 - Trappe, MD Batted: LH Threw: RH Position: 3B Career BA: .307 Teams: Philadelphia Athletics AL (March 13, 1886 - June 28, 1963) New York Yankees AL (1916–1919, 1921–1922) As part of the A’s $100,000 infield along with Stuffy McInnis, Eddie Collins and Black Jack Barry, Frank “Home Run” Baker was an exceptional third baseman and an outstanding hitter whose place in the Hall of Fame is well deserved. Initially, it was thought that the young Baker would not make the grade in Major League baseball. However, Buck Herzog, a friend who was already playing in the majors, convinced a few people to take a shot on the gifted third baseman. Baker did not disappoint, as he batted .305 in 1909, his rookie season with the A’s and set a record for triples by a rookie, which still stands. That season, Baker was the first to hit the ball over the right field fence at the new Shibe Park, but he earned the nickname “Home Run” by going deep on two occasions during the 1911 World Series. Baker played in four World Series with the A’s and led the league in round-trippers over four consecutive seasons from 1911 to 1914. He credited his power-hitting ability to his work on the family farm, and kept in shape by chopping wood in the offseason. Considered the best third baseman of the pre-war era, Baker went on to bat over .300 six times, and twice led the league in RBI. As a third baseman, he led the league in putouts seven times. Due to a salary dispute, Baker returned to his farm for the 1915 season. He was traded to the Yankees in 1916 where he had several good seasons before tragedy struck in 1920. Baker lost his wife to scarlet fever. Grief stricken, he took time off to care for his family, but returned to the Yankees in 1921 in time to play in two more World Series. Later, while managing in the Eastern Shore Baseball League, Baker discovered a pretty good ballplayer and recommended him to Connie Mack. That player was the great Jimmy Foxx. Frank “Home Run” Baker was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1955. He remains one of the greatest third basemen of all time, and is definitely our choice at the hot corner.

For decades, Hugh Duffy was a franchise fixture in Boston, a small white-haired man who over the years had served the Red Sox as manager, scout, occasional first base coach and batting instructor, tryout camp supervisor, and all-around good will ambassador. To the younger Sox faithful, Duffy seemed to have been a club functionary forever. So when his obituary was published in October 1954, many were surprised to learn that Hugh Duffy had once been baseball’s premier batsman. Some 60 years before his death, the little gent had set a single-season major-league batting record by posting a .440 batting average.1 Although extraordinary, the mark was far from a fluke. During a 17-season playing career, Duffy had been an outstanding hitter, attaining yet another unique batting distinction: to this day, he is the only player in history to compile a .300+ career batting average in four different major-league circuits: National League (.326), Players League (.320),American Association (.336), and American League (.302). On top of that, he had also been a standout defensive outfielder, an accomplished base stealer, and an innovative baseball strategist. It was no wonder, then, that the likeness of Hugh Duffy came to be inscribed on a plaque at Cooperstown.

Hughie “Ee-Yah” Jennings goes down as one of the most colorful players and managers who ever stepped onto the field. As a player, Jennings was an outstanding shortstop who had some incredible offensive seasons with the Orioles. He batted over .300 five straight seasons from 1894 to 1898, posting a sensational .401 BA in 1896. That year the tough-as-they-come Jennings was hit by pitches 51 times, setting a National League record. Willing to do whatever it took to get on base, he led the league in HBP five seasons in a row, and his career 287 plunkings are still a Major League record. Also known for his speed, Jennings swiped 70 bases in 1896. Great with the glove, Jennings led the league in putouts on four occasions. As a manager of the Tigers, he was known for his antics while coaching at third base, and his famous shouts of “Ee-Yah” which soon became his nickname. Hughie Jennings was considered near or at the top of the list as a strategist and great teacher of fundamentals. He led the Tigers to the American League pennant three consecutive seasons from 1907 to 1909, but also had the challenging task of keeping the fiery Ty Cobb in check and running interference between Cobb and his archenemy and teammate, Sam Crawford. After 13 seasons in Detroit, Jennings moved on to coach and manage for John McGraw’s Giants, winning the pennant in 1924.

It is interesting that Ira Thomas was even included in the Cracker Jack Collection. Over the two-year period that the cards were released, Ira had exactly three at-bats with a batting average of .000. Why was he in the Collection? A very good catcher with a pretty good bat, Thomas came up from the Eastern League to hook up with the New York Highlanders in 1906 and saw limited action in 44 games, batting .200, but he was considered very strong defensively. Thomas was traded to the Tigers in 1908, and actually appeared in the World Series. As a matter of fact, he had the first pinch hit in World Series history. In December 1908, Thomas was sold to the Philadelphia Athletics where he blossomed as both a team leader and good catcher. The A’s were World Champs in 1910 and 1911, with Thomas appearing in four games of each Fall Classic. From an offensive standpoint he was just adequate, always hovering around the .250 mark, but his leadership skills, his ability to call a good game and to handle pitchers were Thomas’ real strengths. He did not believe in drinking, smoking or the nightlife, which became a problem for his teammates because, of course, they enjoyed all of those things. Since Thomas set such a good example, Connie Mack decided to make him the team captain of the A’s in 1914. This was unusual because by that time his days as a player had pretty much ended, and Thomas was working as a base coach. From all accounts, Connie Mack’s decision led to dissension on the team. Although the Athletics won the pennant that year, they got swept in the Series. Mack dismantled his Philadelphia dynasty after that season but kept Thomas on as coach. Thomas loyally remained with the organization for many years, eventually becoming a well-respected scout, discovering Lefty Grove and George Ernshaw. Why is Ira Thomas in the Cracker Jack Collection? We are not really sure, but it’s possible that Connie Mack had something to do with it. In any event, Ira Thomas was a team guy and a good catcher over the ten years that he played.

Owen “Chief” Wilson’s slashing batting style was a perfect fit for the expanse of Forbes Field in Pittsburgh. Wilson set what may be one of the most unbreakable records in baseball in 1912, when he posted 36 triples. That season the Pirates totaled 129 triples as a team, which is also the MLB record. Wilson was not streamlined at 6 feet 2 inches, and 185 pounds, or particularly speedy, but he drove the ball to the gaps, hitting 59 career homers in nine seasons, 31 of which were inside the park. Originally known as “Tex,” his Pirates teammates called him “Chief” because manager Fred Clarke thought he looked like a chief of the Texas Rangers. Wilson was said to have a tremendous throwing arm and he occasionally demonstrated his considerable prowess with a lariat. Wilson had started his pro career in the Texas League in 1905, and in 1917 he returned to that league for one season to play for the San Antonio Bronchos, after which he retired to his family ranch in Bertram, Texas.

After playing regularly for the Pittsburgh Pirates at second base for three seasons and first base for two, Dots Miller became the quintessential utility man, spending time at every infield position for the Cardinals and Phillies during the last seven years of his 12-year career in the majors. In 1915 Ring Lardner picked Miller as the utility man on his personal all-star team. "When you're picking utility guys, you want fellas that does that for a livin'," wrote Lardner. "The best utility infielder I know anything about is Jack Miller. You can't call him a regular. He's in the game everyday, but he don't never play the same place two days in succession. They're a'scared he might get thinkin' the game was monot'nous and quit." A lifetime .263 hitter and widely respected baseball man, Miller was just embarking on a second career as a manager when he tragically fell sick and died at age 36.

If you were to build a Mount Rushmore of baseball managers, John McGraw would have to be part of any foursome. McGraw managed the New York Giants from 1902 to 1932, winning ten National League pennants and three World Championships. Along the way, he influenced the game of baseball like no one before or since. At 5-foot, 7-inches, 155 pounds, McGraw was famously known as “Little Napoleon,” and the name fit like one of his trademark suits. McGraw was given to violent outbursts toward his players, the opposition, and, of course, umpires. He was not, however, all brimstone and no brains. On the contrary, McGraw brought a cerebral quality to managing, using his mind as much as his mouth. Overshadowed by his amazing managerial record is the fact that John McGraw was one heck of a ballplayer. Some of his numbers are downright unfathomable. With Baltimore in 1898 and 1899, he led the league in runs scored, with 143 and 140, respectively. He also drew a league-leading 236 walks in those two seasons. McGraw had a ridiculous career on-base percentage of .466, and between 1899 and 1901, his OBP exceeded .500. He was a career .334 hitter, and a smart speedster with outstanding base running skills. McGraw was as strong of heart as he was of body and mind. Over the course of his life, he overcame the deaths of his mother, three siblings, and later, his wife. As a child, McGraw was physically abused by his father and eventually moved to a neighboring inn. Despite these personal setbacks, McGraw’s focus was unshaken. His conservative, buttoned-down veneer aside, McGraw was a worldly sort, performing in Vaudeville shows and investing in pool halls, race tracks, and casinos. First and foremost, however, McGraw was a winner. In 33 years as a manager with the Orioles and Giants, he won 2,763 games, second only to Connie Mack. Heed the words of the man himself, “In playing or managing, the game of ball is only fun for me when I'm out in front and winning,” said McGraw. “I don’t give a hill of beans for the rest of the game.” Although retired, John McGraw was selected to manage the National League team in the first All-Star game in 1933, and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1937.

As a Native American playing in the Deadball Era, Jack Meyers couldn't avoid being saddled with the nickname "Chief," but he did as much as any Native American of his generation to shatter the stereotypical image of the dumb Indian. Meyers was far more sophisticated than most of his fellow players. "A strong love of justice, a lightning sense of humor, a fund of general information that runs from politics to Plato, a quick, logical mind, and the self-contained, dignified poise that is the hallmark of good breeding-he is easily the most remarkable player in the big leagues," wrote one reporter. On the field, the strong but slow-footed Meyers was almost certainly the best offensive catcher of the Deadball Era, retiring with a .291 average for his nine-year career.

Black Jack” Barry played on six pennant-winning teams as well as five World Series Champions. Not bad for a guy with a .243 lifetime batting average. As part of Connie Mack’s $100,000 infield along with Eddie Collins, Stuffy McInnis and Home Run Baker, Barry was a dependable shortstop with great range and instincts. Signed out of Holy Cross College, Barry never batted higher than .275 but was a valuable clutch hitter, with all of the tools to be a leader on the field and in the clubhouse. On September 20, 1909, in a heated pennant race with the Detroit Tigers, Barry was spiked by Ty Cobb, who was known to come into the bag with reckless abandon, not caring who he took out in the process. Needless to say, Barry was injured and lost to the team. Some say that was the reason why the Tigers won the pennant. Cobb evidently accomplished his mission. Black Jack had some pretty good seasons thereafter, anchoring the A’s in the leadership category. After the 1915 season, Barry was purchased by the Red Sox, and continued his winning ways playing on the 1915 and 1916 World Series Champs. He became player-manager of the 1917 team leading them to 90 wins. Barry left to serve in the military during WWI, missing the 1918 season, and retired early in 1919. He went on to coach the Holy Cross Crusaders for the next 40 years with the highest winning percentage in collegiate history. Over a span of 39 seasons, he compiled a remarkable 616–150 record. His 1924 team went undefeated and the small college won the NCAA championship in 1952. Referred to as the “Knute Rockne” of college baseball, Jack Barry is a member of the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

John Wesley “Schoolboy” Knight (October 6, 1885 - December 19, 1965) entered the Major Leagues as a talented 19-year old utility infielder with the Philadelphia Athletics when veteran shortstop Monte Cross suffered a broken hand. Legendary Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack signed the youngster straight out of high school and though he got off to a hot start batting .400 in June, he finished his hitting .203 in 88 games during that rookie 1905 campaign. Knight helped the A’s capture their first American League pennant that year, but did not play in the World Series losing effort against the New York Giants. Unfortunately for Knight, Mack was eager to win a World Series and after two and half years in Philly (1905-1907) the A’s traded Schoolboy to the Boston Americans (1907). In 1908, he played his first season in the minor leagues with the Baltimore Orioles of the Eastern League and returned in 1909 to play for the New York Highlanders (1909-1911, 1913). His best year came in New York when he batted .312 with 129 hits, 23 stolen bases and 45 RBI in 117 games. He played the 1912 season with the Washington Senators. He was a decent fielder and posted a .933 fielding percentage with 1,713 assists in 2,359 chances. At the plate, John Knight amassed 636 hits, 301 runs and 270 RBI while batting .239 for his 8-year career.

John “Red” Murray was a player’s player. He is one of only three players to twice finish in the top five in both home runs and stolen bases. The other two to accomplish this feat were Honus Wagner and Ty Cobb. In 1907 Murray hit a 471-foot blast, an absolutely incredible feat considering it was the dead-ball era. He played on four pennant-winning Giants teams and was the home run champ in 1909. He is tied with Honus Wagner for the most MLB home runs from 1907 to 1909 (21). Defensively, Murray was considered one of the best right fielders in the league. With a rifle for an arm, he led the league in assists on several occasions. Although not as famous as Speaker, Cobb, and the rest, Murray certainly would have a place on most All-Star teams. After retiring from the game, Murray settled in Elmira, New York, where he owned a tire store and was recreation director for 18 years. He was inducted into the Elmira Baseball Hall of Fame in 1961.

Jimmy Archer was the regular catcher for the Chicago Cubs from 1911 through 1916, earning a spot on Baseball Magazine's "All-America Team" each year from 1912 to 1914. Renowned for popularizing the snap throw from a squatting position, Archer enjoyed a reputation for having the best throwing arm of any catcher in the Deadball Era. "The best throwing catcher of them all was Jimmy Archer of the Cubs," said Chief Meyers of the New York Giants, the only receiver aside from Archer to catch over 100 games each season from 1911 to 1913. "He didn't have an arm. He had a rifle. And perfect accuracy." Al Bridwell, the ex-Giant shortstop who played with Archer on the 1913 Cubs, agreed. "Best arm of any catcher I ever saw," said the man who received many of Archer's snap throws. "He'd zip it down there to second like a flash. Perfect accuracy, and under a six-foot bar all the way down."

n 1962 sportswriter Joe Reichler named Jimmy Sheckard as the left fielder on the All-Time Chicago Cubs team. Sheckard was a left-handed slugger who batted in the middle of the order during his early years with Brooklyn, then became a leadoff man and master at getting on base in his later years with the Cubs. In various seasons he led the National League in triples, home runs, slugging, runs, on-base percentage, walks, and stolen bases. Sheckard also was an outstanding defensive outfielder--both SABR and STATS, Inc., selected him to their retroactive Gold Glove teams for the first decade of the Deadball Era--and the right-handed thrower's career assist total is one of the highest in history for an outfielder. One sportswriter described Sheckard as "a marvelous workman in his pasture and one of the surest, most deadly outfielders on fly balls that ever choked a near-triple to death by fleetness of foot and steadiness of eye and grip." Another noted that he "did clever things in the outfield in nearly every game and was in a class by himself at trapping a ball." "Sheckard was one of the brightest ball players in the business," proclaimed teammate Johnny Evers, "and he was a bigger cog in the old invincible Cub machine than he ever received credit for being." Many agreed. "Sheckard knows 'inside baseball' as well as the next man," wrote one sportswriter, "and should be credited with some of the Chicagoisms that have heretofore been attributed to more famous members of the Cubs." One reason he is less remembered than some Cub teammates is that, while he did many things brilliantly, he didn't always do them consistently or at the same time. Sheckard's highest batting average was .354 in 1901, but he also batted .239 in 1904 and .231 in 1908. He led the NL in 1903 with nine home runs, the same number he hit over the next six seasons combined. And his 147 bases on balls in 1911 were an NL record that stood until Eddie Stanky broke it in 1945, but in many other years his walk totals were about half that number.

“Death Valley Jim” Scott was one of the fastest guns in the west, or in his case, the Midwest. The 6-foot, 1-inch, 235 pound hurler played nine seasons with the Chicago White Sox and was known for mixing junk with a hard fastball and for a blistering pickoff move to first base. According to legend, Scott got his nickname from an erroneous reference to his native Deadwood, South Dakota, or from the fact that he shared a train ride with a notorious criminal named Death Valley Scott. After leaving Wesleyan University medical school to pursue a baseball career, Scott went 12–12 in 1909, his rookie year with the White Sox. In 1910, he lost 18 games but led the American League in games finished with 17. Three years later, he won 20 games, but lost 21 with a miniscule ERA of 1.90. He actually finished 14th in MVP voting that season. Scott had a no-hitter through nine innings in 1914, but lost his shot at history, and the game, in the tenth. His best year was 1915 when he went 24–11 with a 2.03 ERA and a league-leading seven shutouts. Scott was a spitballer, but he used a full arsenal to register 945 career Ks. In 1917, he ended Ty Cobb’s 35-game hitting streak, and the White Sox won the World Series, but Scott left the club mid-season to serve in World War I. After his return, Scott pitched in the Pacific Coast League and Southern Association until 1927, putting together a 155–108 Minor League record. He then worked as an umpire until 1932. In retirement, Scott worked in the film industry, and reportedly joined a religious cult. He passed away in 1957, but as he faded off into the sunset, no one would soon forget the legend of “Death Valley Jim.”

One of the most energetic players of his era, Jimmy Austin was a sparkplug for the New York Highlanders and St. Louis Browns over an 18-year career spent entirely in the American League. A speedy switch-hitting third baseman, Austin stole at least twenty bases in each of his first six major league seasons, and he was regularly among the league leaders in sacrifice hits. What he lacked in stature, the 5' 7 1/2" 155 lb. Austin made up for in hustle, leading his manager with New York, George Stallings, to give Austin the nickname "Pepper." Even during his coaching tenure with the Chicago White Sox in the 1930s, Austin was still known throughout baseball for being vocal and jumping around with the energy of a young man. In fact, one contemporary sportswriter reflected that, "If pepper had not been discovered some years before James Austin was born, those who know him well would have been prone to assert that the condiment was named after 'Jimmy' instead of 'Jimmy' being named after it. He surely is the essence of pepper."

The initial third baseman enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, Jimmy Collins was an outstanding fielder and above-average hitter during his 14-year major-league career in the Deadball Era. As the first manager of the Boston franchise in the American League, Collins gained widespread acclaim when he led the team to consecutive pennants in 1903 and 1904 and victory in the inaugural 1903 World Series. Collins was a businessman in a baseball uniform. In an interview with the Buffalo Evening News just a few weeks before his death, he gave writer Cy Kritzer an encyclopedic recall of his salary levels as a ballplayer, practically gloating about once earning $18,000 in one year, but yet, as Kritzer related, “he couldn’t recall once during the interview the size of his batting average in any one season.”1 It wasn’t just about acquiring money, though. Collins used his baseball income to develop a real-estate business by building multifamily rental housing, which provided his income after his playing days.

A smallish spitballer, right-hander Jimmy Dygert joined the Philadelphia Athletics in September 1905. Two years later, his career season almost enabled Philadelphia to overtake Detroit in the heated 1907 American League pennant race. From there, Dygert’s wildness undercut his prospects. When the Athletics claimed their first world championship in 1910, Dygert was an afterthought, his major league career in its final season.

These are the saddest of possible words: “Tinker to Evers to Chance.” Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double- Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: “Tinker to Evers to Chance.” Published July 10, 1910, in the New York Evening Mail newspaper. As part of the greatest double play combo of all time Joe Tinker, along with Johnny Evers and Frank Chance, led the Cubs to four World Series. A slightly above average hitter, Tinker made up for his offensive deficiencies with his slick-fielding play at shortstop. Considered one of the best, as shortstop Tinker led the league in assists three times, putouts two times, fielding percentage five times, and range factor four times. Interestingly enough, Tinker had an ongoing feud with his partner at second base, Johnny Evers, and as a result they did not speak to each other for almost 33 years. Although he compiled a lifetime batting average of .262, Tinker was very skilled at bunting, delivering hit-and-run plays, and strategically placing hits. He was the catalyst in the one-game playoff against the Giants after the famous “Merkle” game in 1908. As a matter of fact, he was the one responsible for the lone run in the infamous game itself, hitting a home run off Christy Mathewson. Once that game was declared a tie, Tinker helped the Cubs take the subsequent playoff game when he hit a triple off Mathewson that triggered a four-run inning. After the 1912 season, Johnny Evers was named manager of the Cubs and Tinker understandably wanted out. He was traded to the Reds where he played and managed for one season. Tinker then jumped to the new Federal League as player-manager of the Chicago Chi-Feds (later known as the Whales) and led his 1915 Whales to the Federal League pennant. After the league folded, the Cubs took him back as manager for the 1916 season. Tinker then owned and managed teams in the American Association and the Florida State League. His business ventures included real estate development in Orlando, Florida, where the historic ballpark Tinker Field was named in his honor. He later scouted for the Cubs. Joe Tinker was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1946.

Known for his offensive prowess as well as his blazing speed. Hans Lobert was considered one of the fastest players of the Deadball Era. Over his 14-year career he batted over .300 on four occasions, and stole 316 bases. Defensively, he was very good with a tremendous arm. As a third baseman, he led the league in putouts in 1911 and 1913; and in fielding percentage when he posted .974 in 1913. Purely from the speed perspective, legend has it that Lobert actually raced a thoroughbred before a game and also beat the legendary Jim Thorpe in a 100 yard dash. Dubbed “Hans Number 2” during his rookie year with the Pirates by teammate Honus Wagner (“Hans Number 1”), Lobert did not last long with the Pirates, but the nickname stayed with him for life. His best days were with the A’s, although he did have some successful campaigns with the Reds. By the time he reached the Giants his better playing days were behind him. Plagued by a knee injury, his last two years as a player were not productive. After he retired, Lobert had eight good seasons at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point as baseball coach, followed by management stints in the Eastern League and the International League. He returned to the Bigs to manage the Phillies for two games in 1938 going 0–2, and had one full, but dismal, season managing them in 1942, posting a 42–109 record. Lobert went on to spend many years in professional baseball serving as a scout for the Giants right up until his death at the age of 86.

Arguably one of the most overlooked star players of the Dead Ball Era, catcher Johnny Kling was a key part of the great Chicago Cubs Dynasty of 1906-10. When his baseball career was over, Kling returned to his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri where he enjoyed a successful business career. A modest man, Kling never thought anyone would be interested in his accomplishments as a player once he retired. During the Dead Ball Era a strong defensive catcher was a key component of any great team, due to the emphasis on bunting and base stealing. Kling was the dominant defensive catcher during the first ten years of the twentieth century. From 1902 through 1908 he led the National League in fielding percentage twice, putouts six times, and assists and double plays once each. Cub pitcher Ed Reulbach called Kling one of the greatest catchers to ever wear a mask. In at notable game on June 21, 1907 he threw out all four Cardinal runners who tried to steal second, and in the World Series he gunned down 5 of 11 Tiger runners, holding base stealing champion Ty Cobb to no stolen bases. As his 1902 figures showed, he was no easy out at bat and was a strong contributor to the Cub offense. In 1906 he hit .312 and batted in 46 runs on a Cubs team that the most games (116) in history. Kling had a career batting average of .272. His contemporaries, team mates and opponents alike, marveled at his ability to defend, handle pitchers and take part in the psychological warfare which was baseball in the early twentieth century. Johnny Evers claimed Kling could tell pitchers what their best stuff was during warm-ups. He kept up a steady string of chatter earning him the nickname 'Noisy.' Evers praised Kling for his ability to work umpires on balls and strikes, yet Kling avoided antagonizing the men in blue, even warning them if an unusual play or pitch was coming.

Nicknamed “The Crab” because of the unusual crablike stance he used to scoop up ground balls, Johnny Evers (pronounced Eevers) was well known as part of the greatest double-play combination of all time as immortalized in the poem written by newspaper columnist Franklin Pierce Adams entitled Baseball’s Sad Lexicon. A wiry 125 pounds, Evers was a solid second baseman who played on the great Cubs teams from 1902 through 1913 and appeared in four World Series, winning two of them. Later traded to the Boston Braves, he not only won another World Series, but also won the Chalmers Award (MVP) in 1914. A real sparkplug for his size, Evers was tossed out of nine games during the 1914 season. He became known for arguing with teammates, opponents and officials, which gave his nickname, “The Crab,” a new meaning.

In 1907, Lush was traded to the St.Louis Cardinals. On September 2, 1907, teammate Art Fromme pitched the first game of a twin bill, shutting out the Cubs, 6-0. In the nightcap Lush also shut out the Cubs, 9-0, something of a rarity in baseball and made more special by the fact that the Cubs won the pennant and World Series that year. On August 6, 1908, Lush tossed another no-hitter against Brooklyn, winning 2-0 in a rain-shortened six-inning affair. Continually dogged by bad teams, Lush won only 46 more games through the 1910 season. After that year he retired from major league baseball. Lush played sporadically on the West Coast for a few years. On September 20, 1914, pitching for Portland in the Pacific Coast League he was on the losing side of a no-hitter, dropping the game 1-0. He retired from professional baseball after the 1914 season.

Teams: Pittsburgh Pirates NL (1903–1904) Chicago Cubs NL (1906–1911) Jack “The Giant Killer” Pfiester (born John Albert Hagenbush) had a lifetime ERA of 2.02, good for third all-time for pitchers who have thrown 1,000 or more innings. His nickname was a result of his dominance over the New York Giants. He amassed a 15–5 record against them over the course of his career. Pfiester’s devastating curveball was his out pitch. In a feat unheard of in the game today, he struck out 17 batters in 15 amazing innings on May 30, 1906. He was also on the mound the day that the Giants’ Fred Merkle failed to touch second base, and thus avoided a loss. Considered one of the elite pitchers in the game, he had one 20-win season with the Cubs and pitched in four World Series. Pfiester dabbled in the minors after his MLB career until he was 38 years old, pitching for the Louisville Colonels in the American Association and the Sioux City Indians in the Western League. He retired in 1916 with a six-season 88–69 minor league record.

"Silent John" Titus was a strong-armed outfielder who recorded more than 20 assists for seven straight seasons, but he was better known for his quiet demeanor, his mustache, his selectivity at the plate, and the ubiquitous toothpick in his mouth. "Titus had one of the best batting eyes I ever saw," said Pete Alexander, who played with Titus on the Phillies during the early part of his career. "He would take his position at the plate with the easiest and most confident air in the world. If the ball was an inch outside of the plate, he would watch it go by and never bat an eye lash. If it was an inch inside, he wouldn't move. He would just draw in his stomach and let the ball pass. But if you put the ball over the plate, he would whale the cover off. It used to exasperate me merely to watch him. Many a time I have said to myself, If I were pitching, Old Man, I'd knock that toothpick out of your mouth and maybe then you'd move over."

One of the best second basemen of the era, “Laughing Larry” Doyle could do it all. Known for his outgoing personality and happy disposition, he was well-liked by manager John McGraw and his Giants teammates. The former coal miner was no standout when he first arrived in the Major Leagues, but McGraw stood by his highly paid rookie, giving him the opportunity to develop into an outstanding player. Doyle eventually became captain of the Giants and one of baseball’s biggest stars, leading the National League in several offensive and defensive categories. Besides being on three pennant winners as team captain, he led the National League with 172 hits in 1909 and 25 triples in 1911. Doyle’s 184 hits and .330 batting average earned him the Chalmers Award (National League MVP) in 1912, and his trophy was a brand new Chalmers automobile. He won the batting title in 1915 with a sparkling .320 average, and led the league in hits, singles and doubles as well that year. At the height of his career, the second sacker was paid a salary of $8,000 which was almost as much earned by his famous roommate, Christy Mathewson.

Always hustling and full of pep, Russell “Lena” Blackburne was a superb defensive infielder from 1908 to 1926. Though a solid hitter in the minors, he struggled to hit major-league pitching. After his playing career ended, he served for three decades as a coach, manager, and scout. He is perhaps best known for a unique contribution he made to the game: supplying a muddy concoction for removing the slippery sheen from new baseballs.

Mike Mitchell played 5 years in the minors, batting .339 in 1906 for the Portland Beavers in the Pacific Coast League to earn his shot in the big leagues at age 27. He was a consistent outfielder for four different teams during his 8-year MLB career. In 1909 and 1910 he led the National League in triples, and in 1909 he batted .310, good for second in the league. Mitchell then had several more solid seasons, batting in the 280s, and hit .291 in 1911. During his stint in the big leagues, he banged out 1,138 hits and 27 homers. He returned to the minors in 1916 to play for the Newark Indians in the International League for 1 year before retiring at age 36 as a minor league career .290 hitter.

Praised for his outfield defense and savvy base running skills, Matty McIntyre was the starting left fielder and leadoff hitter on two Detroit Tiger pennant winning teams. Although a broken ankle in 1907 somewhat diminished his defensive abilities, McIntyre was still able to contribute with the bat upon his return and was considered to be among the best left-handed batters facing left-handed pitching. In 1908 he led the major leagues in runs scored and was part of one of the greatest outfields of all time along with Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford. Long a nemesis of Cobb and long rumored to be on the trading block, McIntyre was nonetheless a popular player on the teams for which he played and led a number of all-star teams to Cuba during his off-seasons.

As shortstops go during the Deadball Era, the slick-fielding Mickey “Doc” Doolan was right up there defensively with the best. Forget about his lifetime .230 batting average. Mickey was one of those players whose defense was his offense. As a matter of fact, his fielding was so good that he was in the running for MVP honors on a few occasions. A student at Bucknell College and Villanova University, Doolan earned a degree in dentistry and actually had a dental practice in the offseason during his baseball career. His first love, however, was filling the hole at short. A league leader in several fielding categories, Doolan was, at one time or another, tops in putouts, fielding percentage, assists and double plays. His lifetime fielding percentage of .941 does not seem spectacular compared to some of the other shortstops of that era, but he made plays that few others could make, and was respected for his stellar defensive play. There is really not much to discuss about his hitting although he managed to bat .263 for Philadelphia in 1910. Doolan was team captain with the Phillies from 1909 to 1913 and was vice president of the Fraternity of Professional Baseball Players of America, the Major League players’ union of the day. After making a quick stop to the Federal League, Doolan returned to the National League through 1918 and then played for Jack Dunn’s Baltimore Orioles in the International League in 1919. After retiring as a player, Doolan coached for the Cubs and the Reds for several years before leaving the game in 1932. He then went into dentistry full time for 15 years and retired from that profession in 1947.

Miller Huggins was the Hall of Fame manager who led the New York Yankees to their first six American League pennants and three world championships, in the 1920s. He forged unique relationships with both Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert and their star outfielder, Babe Ruth. One newspaperman wrote, “Yankee owner Jacob Ruppert saw in Huggins a man worthy of confidence, a man hung on the cross of propaganda, which was as cruel as it was false, and as unfounded as it was detrimental to the cause of the Yankees.”1 Huggins was also an accomplished second baseman in the Deadball Era, when he excelled despite being one of the smallest men to ever play the National Pastime. Underestimated as both a player and a manager, Huggins overcame great obstacles to excel. Baseball was his life, but ultimately the stress he experienced in it may have contributed to his premature death at age 51.

Mordecai Peter Centennial Brown, best known today for his unusual name and his more or less descriptive nickname of "Three Finger," was the ace right-hander of the great Chicago Cub teams of the first decade or so of the Twentieth Century. With Brown leading an extraordinary pitching staff, the Cubs from 1906 through 1910 put together the greatest five-year record of any team in baseball history. His battles with the Giants' Christy Mathewson epitomized the bitter rivalry between two teams that just about matched each other man for man.

On July 19, 1909, Neal Ball had the distinction of pulling off the first unassisted triple play in major league history. A pretty good hitter, Ball’s best year was 1911, when he batted .296 with 3 home runs. He did get the thrill of 1 at bat in the 1912 World Series for the Red Sox. Ball was considered a good, steady ballplayer by his peers. Around his time in the majors, he spent 14 seasons in the minors, where he once played in a game against Negro League star and future Hall of Famer Rube Foster. Ball played in the minors until 1924, mostly for the New Haven Murlins in the Eastern League. He also managed two seasons in the Eastern League for the Bridgeport Hustlers and the Pittsfield Hillies and one season for the Augusta Tygers in the South Atlantic League, before retiring in 1926 at the age of 45. After his return to private life, he worked as a hat salesman and a bowling alley manager.

A huge man for the Deadball Era, standing 6'2" and weighing 214 lbs., Orval Overall was a right-handed curveball specialist who compiled a lifetime 108-71 record and 2.23 ERA, the eighth best ERA in major-league history. "Overall pitches his curve with a wide, sweeping overhand swing, releasing the ball over the side of the index finger as his hand turns downward," wrote Johnny Evers in Touching Second. "His swing and curve are duplicates of those used by Adonis Terry, Jim McCormick, and some of the great pitchers of the past, and when his jerk motion at the finish of the wide swing is sharp, the curve actually darts downward." With a reputation as a "money pitcher," Overall pitched on Opening Day each year from 1906 to 1910, and in 1909 he usually pitched the opening game of each regular-season series. He also compiled a 3-1 record and 1.58 ERA in four World Series.

Oscar Stanage had an interesting career as a catcher. Known to have the strongest arm in the league, he set the American League record in 1911 for assists by a catcher (212), which still stands, and he is in the top 20 of all time in that category. Stanage also led the league in games caught that year, with an amazing 141 games. On the other side of the coin, he was a weak hitter, and surprisingly, a poor defensive catcher. He had 41 errors in 1911, which is a record, and he is in the top ten for most errors at his position. His best year offensively was 1911, when he batted .264. At age 42, Stanage was one of the oldest players in the American League when he made his last MLB appearance while coaching for the Tigers. He then managed the Evansville Hubs of the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League, finishing 72–66 in 1926, and coached for the Pirates from 1927 to 1931.

Back in an era when a manager's responsibilities often included both the duties of a modern skipper plus those of today's general manager, Pat Moran excelled at each role. In a span of six years Moran took over two mediocre franchises with little history of winning, rebuilt and reassembled their players, and managed each to a pennant. Unfortunately, his place in the pantheon of great managers never solidified due to his unexpected and premature death at age 48.

Paddy Livingston had a long career between the majors and the minors, but his MLB days lasted only seven seasons. A pretty good catcher with a very weak bat, he was a friendly and gregarious fellow. Livingston is most known for making the throw to Frank “Home Run” Baker to catch Ty Cobb stealing third base in August 1909. The play was captured on film, showing Cobb coming in spikes high. Baker was injured on the play, and the now-famous photo hangs in the Hall of Fame. Around his MLB tours, he played seven seasons in the minors, four of them with the Indianapolis Indians of the American Association. He was player/manager for the 1917 Milwaukee Brewers in the American Association before retiring as a player with a .313 minor league batting average. Livingston then coached for the A’s and later worked for the city of Cleveland, retiring in 1963. He lived to age 97, and was the last surviving player from the American League’s first season (1901).

In 1941...29 years before Joltin’ Joe was smacking the horsehide around American League parks, another one of the great players in Gotham set his own streak. And it was just as impressive. Rube Marquard, who was a pitcher on the 1912 New York Giants, put together a single-season winning streak that, like DiMaggio’s, still stands. Beginning with his first start of the season, at Brooklyn on April 11, Marquard won 19 games in a row. He didn’t lose until July 8. During the streak, left-handed pitcher Marquard had an earned-run average of 1.63. If the same streak were played under the rules that are employed today, Marquard would have won 20 in a row. On April 20, against the Brooklyn Superbas, Marquard relieved Jeff Tesreau in the ninth inning. Tesreau had given up three runs and Brooklyn had taken a 3-2 lead over the New Yorkers. Marquard recorded all three outs in the ninth, and retreated to the dugout to watch the Giants score two in the bottom of the frame to win, 4-3. In those days, the win went to the pitcher who had pitched the most innings. In today’s game, Marquard would get the win since he was the pitcher of record when the Giants took the lead. Marquard credited Giants manager John McGraw for sticking with him during the early years of his career, when wins were hard to come by. Both McGraw and coach Wilbert Robinson echoed the same refrain to Marquard: “You’ve got it in you, if you can only find yourself.”1 But the pitcher also noted the other successful tactics he employed. “I suppose the great thing is to find the weaknesses of the batsmen you’re pitching against,” said Marquard. ”Why, you’ve got to know ’em like your hand. I used to keep a book and watch each fellow like a hawk when he’d come up to the plate, and I’d mark down in that book just what he couldn’t do. After a while, I’d find some of ’em couldn’t hit a fastball. Then I’d write that down. “Then players talk among themselves and swap experiences, for the one thing a ballplayer talks is shop. You never seem to talk anything else when you play ball. So you get to know the different players like an old pair of shoes. Then on a dark day, I blacken the ball.”2 Asked what he meant, Marquard replied, “I chew tobacco so when I spit on the ball, it blackens up. Then I get it against my dark glove and a batsman can’t see it.”3

Standing a tad under 5'8" and weighing just 145 lbs., Bobby Byrne was a scrappy, pint-sized third baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates towards the end of their reign as one of the National League's top teams. "Byrne is always a dangerous man for the reason that at all times he is cool, nervy and smart," wrote Alfred H. Spink, founder of The Sporting News, in 1910. Perhaps his actions in a game against Brooklyn on June 10, 1911, best illustrate the type of player he was: with Byrne at first and Fred Clarke at third, the two Pirates pulled off a double steal, with Byrne sneaking to third as Brooklyn catcher Bill Bergen argued the call at home with umpire Bill Klem. After Dots Miller walked, he and Byrne pulled off another double steal, giving the hustling leadoff hitter steals of second, third, and home in the same inning.

In his prime, Long Bob Ewing-the "Long" referring to his 6'1", 170-pound frame-was the workhorse of the Cincinnati Reds' staff, becoming their winningest pitcher of the Deadball Era and the most significant spitball pitcher in the history of the franchise. Toiling for six managers in eight years on a succession of teams that never finished within 15 games of first place, Ewing led the Reds in complete games twice, victories and strikeouts three times each. He has the second highest career E.R.A. (1,000 or more innings) in franchise history, trailing only Noodles Hahn. Though he never led the National League in a major statistical category, Ewing did finish second in innings pitched, complete games and strikeouts in 1907.

A versatile athlete who played all nine positions at the major-league level, Roger Bresnahan is generally regarded today as the Deadball Era's most famous catcher, as well known for his innovations in protective equipment as for his unusual skill package that made him one of the first catchers ever used continuously at the top of the batting order. Catchers almost always batted eighth in the Deadball Era, but Bresnahan was adept at reaching base (he had a .419 on-base percentage in 1906) and possessed surprising speed despite his 5'9", 200-pound frame. Like his close friend and mentor, John McGraw, the .279 lifetime hitter had a quick temper and was inherently tactless. One reporter described him as "highly strung and almost abnormally emotional," but he also had a soft heart. During his five years as a big-league manager, Bresnahan reportedly fined more players and took less money than any of his peers.

A slick-fielding outfielder that could hit and run with the best, Rube Oldring had a successful yet injury-prone Major League career which was spent mostly with the Athletics. His best offensive year was 1910 when he batted .308, but a leg injury kept him from playing in the World Series that year. Oldring led the American League in fielding percentage in 1910, 1911 and 1913. The fleet-footed Oldring also snagged 197 stolen bases over his career. An integral part of the 1911 and 1913 World Champion A’s teams, Oldring also helped the A’s take the AL pennant in 1914. In Game 4 of the 1913 Series, he made an incredible shoestring catch to hold runners on base. That catch is considered one of the greatest in World Series history. Oldring was so popular with the fans in 1913 that he was voted the Athletics’ top player and was presented with a brand new Cadillac. Plagued with injuries off and on throughout his playing years, Oldring was also not in the best playing shape on occasion, which of course resulted in more injuries. As a matter of fact, Connie Mack once suspended both Oldring and his teammate Chief Bender for a little too much carousing. After his MLB playing days, Oldring went on to manage and play in the minors through 1926. He finally hung them up and retired at age 42 to become a gentleman farmer in New Jersey. Oldring is credited with making many contributions to various youth baseball programs. As a matter of fact, the Rube Oldring Field, part of the Dreams Park Little League Complex in Cooperstown, NY, was dedicated to Oldring in 1997 for his many contributions to youth baseball.

Why isn’t Sherry Magee in the Hall of Fame? Taking a hard look at his stats, Magee measures up against many who are in Cooperstown’s hallowed Hall. The prototypical five-tool player, Sherry Magee was one of the true stars of the Deadball Era. An outstanding offensive and defensive player, Magee scored 100-plus runs twice, was the NL RBI champ four times (1907, 1910, 1914, 1918), the NL batting champ in 1910, and played for the World Champion Reds in 1919. He knocked in 1,176 runs and had 2,169 hits over his brilliant 16-year career. Magee’s best year was 1910 when he batted .331 and led the league with 110 runs and 123 RBI. That year he also had a sparkling .445 on base percentage, and let’s not forget his .507 slugging percentage. Magee was also a whiz on the basepaths, swiping 441 bases. Known for his hot temper and orneriness, he developed a reputation as a troublemaker. During a game in 1911, Magee punched out an umpire, sending him to the hospital with a broken nose, and ended up suspended for most of the season. Many fans enjoyed getting on Magee during games because they felt he always put himself ahead of his team. He eventually wore out his welcome wherever he played and found himself back in the minors as was very common in those days. Magee played for another seven seasons in the minors and had some outstanding offensive years. It is ironic that after so many scraps with umpires over his career, he worked as an umpire in the New York-Penn League and the National League after his playing career ended. However, Magee’s career as umpire was cut short when he contracted pneumonia in early March of 1929 and died two weeks later at the age of 44. A great hitter? Certainly. A great defensive player? Undoubtedly. A Hall of Famer? Unfortunately, Sherry Magee has not yet made the grade.

Tom “Deerfoot” Needham was the proverbial “no-bat, good-glove” ballplayer whose defensive abilities kept him in the majors. A weak hitter, Needham managed a .260 batting average his first year in the majors, but then plummeted after that with some seasons in the .180s range or below. His upside was his defensive versatility. Although primarily a catcher, he had a strong arm and good instincts and was a very good fielder. This allowed him to play the outfield and all infield positions except shortstop in addition to catching. He did not get many at bats during the second half of his career, but he managed to stay in the Bigs nevertheless. He wrapped up his career as manager of the Newark Bears in the International League for one season in 1917, finishing with an 86–68 record.

Baltimore Orioles AL (1902) St. Louis Browns AL (1904–1909) Detroit Tigers AL (1909–1910) Tom Jones played eight seasons at first base, six with the St. Louis Browns. His biggest contributions were in sacrifices; he led the American League with 40 in 1906 and finished in the top six in the league for the next four seasons. In August 1909, he was traded to the Tigers for Claude Rossman. Jones hit .262 for the Tigers in 179 games over the next two seasons, posted one of his 4 career homers, and drove in 63 runs. He played in the 1909 World Series against the Pirates, hitting .250 in 24 at bats with 1 double, 1 stolen base, and 2 RBI. After leaving Detroit, Jones played for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American Association for five seasons before managing the Johnsonburg Johnnies in the Interstate League in 1916. He then retired a with a .278 minor league batting average.

nthony Smith (May 14, 1884 – February 27, 1964) was an American professional baseball shortstop. He played in Major League Baseball from 1907 through 1911 for the Washington Senators and Brooklyn Superbas / Dodgers.

Tully “Topsy” Hartsel finished in the league’s top ten in walks in ten out of his 14 MLB seasons. In five of those seasons, he led the league. The main reason is that at 5 feet 5 inches and 155 pounds, Hartsel presented a small target for pitchers of the day. His 121 walks in 1905 remained a league record until pitchers started pitching around Babe Ruth in the 1920s. The diminutive leadoff hitter hit .276 over his big league career, leading the A’s to four pennants in his ten seasons in Philly. He twice topped .400 in on-base percentage, leading the league both times, and twice topped 100 runs scored, leading the league with 109 in 1902. A respected baseball mind and gifted sign stealer, Hartsel was essentially an on-the-field coach to Connie Mack for most of his time with the A’s. Hartsel went on to manage the American Association’s Toledo Mud Hens from 1912 to 1914, and retired in Toledo to open an “automatic baseball” business. He later worked at the Community Traction Company until 1941 and managed their baseball team.

Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb’s friendly rival as the greatest center fielder of the Deadball Era, could field and throw better than the Georgia Peach even if he could not quite match him as a hitter. Legendary for his short outfield play, Speaker led the American League in putouts seven times and in double plays six times in a 22-year career with Boston, Cleveland, Washington, and Philadelphia. Speaker’s career totals in both categories are still major-league records at his position. No slouch at the plate, Speaker had a lifetime batting average of .345, sixth on the all-time list, and no one has surpassed his career mark of 792 doubles. He was also one of the game’s most successful player-managers. A man’s man who hunted, fished, could bulldog a steer, and taught Will Rogers how to use a lariat, Speaker was involved in more than his share of umpire baiting and brawls with teammates and opposing players. But when executing a hook slide on the bases, tracking a fly ball at the crack of an opponent’s bat, or slashing one of his patented extra-base hits, Speaker made everything he did look easy.

On August 2, 1907, a young man later described by Frank Graham as "beyond doubt, the greatest pitcher that ever scuffed a rubber with his spikes"1 made his big-league debut for the Washington Senators, losing a 3-2 decision to the pennant-bound Detroit Tigers. The great Ty Cobb admitted his fastball "made me flinch" and "hissed with danger."2 By the time he hung up his spikes 20 years later, Walter Johnson had recorded statistics which seem beyond belief — 417 wins and 279 losses, 3,509 strikeouts, 110 shutouts, 12 20-win seasons, 11 seasons with an earned run average below 2.00, and what seems almost incomprehensible a century later, 531 complete games in 666 starts. But, as superlative as his pitching record was, in Shirley Povich's words, "Walter Johnson, more than any other ballplayer, probably more than any other athlete, professional or amateur, became the symbol of gentlemanly conduct in the heat of battle."3

William Aloysius Foxen (May 31, 1879 - April 17, 1937) pitched four years in the Major League with the Philadelphia Phillies (1908-1910) and the Chicago Cubs (1910-1911). Bill’s best year came in 1908, his rookie campaign, as he went 7-7 with a 1.95 ERA, though he did finish the season second in wild pitches with eight. He also finished in the top ten in wild pitches the next year with seven. He spent eight years pitching in the minor leagues where he posted a record of 81-71 in 254 games. In half that time pitching for the Phillies and the Cubs, Bill Foxen finished his career with a 16-20 record with 130 strikeouts, 20 complete games, three shutouts and a 2.56 ERA in 61 games.

Zack Wheat remains the Dodgers all-time franchise leader in hits, doubles, triples, RBI, and total bases. Though he threw right-handed, Wheat was a natural left-handed hitter who corkscrewed his spikes into the dirt with a wiggle that became his trademark. Unlike most Deadball Era hitters, he held his hands way down by the knob of the bat, refusing to choke up. "There is no chop-hitting with Wheat, but a smashing swipe which, if it connects, means work for the outfielders," wrote one reporter. He was an outstanding first-ball hitter, and he was also so renowned as a curveball hitter that John McGraw reportedly had a standing order prohibiting his pitchers from throwing him benders. But even after years of hitting .300, it was Wheat's stylish defense that won him the most admirers. "What Lajoie was to infielders, Zach Wheat is to outfielders, the finest mechanical craftsman of them all," Baseball Magazine crowed in 1917. "Wheat is the easiest, most graceful of outfielders with no close rivals." An extremely fast runner, Zack was as close to a five-tool player as anyone of his era. His only weaknesses were his poor base-stealing ability and proneness to injury (his tiny size 5 feet frequently caused nagging ankle injuries).

He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, Brooklyn Superbas, Chicago Cubs, and Pittsburgh Rebels. While playing for the Rebels in 1914, Lennox hit for the cycle on May 6, becoming the only Federal League player to do so. He also hit pinch-hit home runs in consecutive games on June 10 and 11, a feat that was not accomplished again until Victor Martinez of the Detroit Tigers did so against the Miami Marlins on April 4 and 5, 2016.

Fred “Snow” Snodgrass will forever be remembered as the outfielder who dropped a routine fly ball in the tenth inning of the deciding game of the 1912 World Series, helping the Red Sox win the game. People forget, however, that he was a very solid ballplayer with a good bat and glove over the course of his career. He batted .321 in 1910, .294 in 1911, and .291 in 1913 and was always considered a good team player and a credit to the game. He went on to become a successful banker, and a city councilor and then mayor of Oxnard, California, but could never live down the “Snodgrass Muff,” his infamous World Series play. A similar thing happened to another player in another era during the 1986 World Series. That man was also a very good player and a credit to the game. Both players deserve better.

Harry “Rocks” McIntire went 71–117 over nine major league seasons. His winning percentage was mortally wounded, however, by his first five seasons with the very bad Brooklyn Superbas. His record in Brooklyn was 46–98 with a 3.11 ERA, including three seasons in which he lost 20 or more games. The highlight of his career also came during this period, however, when he threw a no-hitter through ten innings in August 1906 against the Pirates. Unfortunately, his team lost in the 13th inning due to a costly error. He also led the National League in hit batsmen in 1905, 1908, and 1909. In his next three seasons, with Chicago, he went 25–18 with a 3.56 ERA, and in 1910 he pitched five innings in the World Series. He retired after the 1913 season when he was 34 years old.

Between playing and managing, Pat Moran spent 23 years in the majors. All in all, he was a much better manager than a player. A decent catcher defensively, Moran was proficient at handling pitchers. His best offensive year was 1903, when he batted .262 and had 7 home runs, good for second in the league. As a manager, he had many winning seasons. He led the Phillies to the World Series in 1915, losing 4–1 to the Red Sox. In 1919 he managed the winning Reds in the infamous World Series against the Chicago “Black Sox.” After reporting to spring training in 1924, Moran became ill from Bright’s disease and passed away soon after, cutting short his successful career as an MLB manager.

Leaving Nap “Larry” Lajoie off the Cracker Jack All-Star Team may seem ludicrous. After all, how many players get teams named after them? Nap Lajoie was a truly great ballplayer. There is no debate there. As a matter of fact, he was once walked intentionally—with the bases loaded. It is said that he could hit so hard that it actually tore the cover right off the ball on a few occasions. In 1901, Nap batted an amazing .426 with 232 hits. During his 21 seasons in the majors, he batted over .300 sixteen times. Probably the greatest and most controversial batting race in history took place in 1910 between Nap Lajoie and Ty Cobb. The race was tight, but Cobb had the advantage. Lajoie would need a hit in every at-bat in his final game of the season to win. The Naps faced the St. Louis Browns that historic day. The Browns disliked Cobb so much that they helped Lajoie by playing their third baseman in shallow left field, even though Lajoie was laying down bunts. Lajoie went 8-for-8, securing the title with the aid of the opposing team. A week later, Ban Johnson, the American League president, declared Cobb the winner by a .000860 margin. By his figures, Lajoie finished at .384 to Cobb’s .385 BA. However, both Cobb and Lajoie were awarded a new Chalmers automobile as they were essentially tied. The 1910 contest is still controversial to this day, with some sources showing Cobb the winner, and some showing Lajoie as batting champ. Defensively Lajoie was stellar at second base, leading the lead in assists three times, putouts five times, and fielding percentage seven times. When he was traded to the Cleveland Bronchos in 1902, the team was so ecstatic that they renamed themselves the Naps at the end of the season. Lajoie was part of the second class elected to the Hall of Fame and lived to the ripe old age of 89. With a .338 lifetime batting average, over 3,200 hits, three uncontested batting titles, a Triple Crown, as well as solid defensive play, Nap Lajoie could be considered one of the three or four greatest second basemen of all time.

His real name was Francesco Stephano Pezzolo, or was it Franceto Sanguenitta Pizzola? While historians have argued about Ping Bodie’s name, no one can debate his consistency. During his nine-year career as an outfielder with the White Sox, Athletics, and Yankees, you could most often pencil Bodie in for 60 to 80 RBI, 5 to 10 home runs, 20 to 30 doubles, and a .270 to .290 batting average. One of the first Italian-Americans to make the big leagues, Bodie got the nickname Ping from the sound the ball made careening from his 52-ounce bat. That sound was made most often in 1917 when he had 162 hits, 74 RBI and a .291 batting average. Legend has it that he took the name Bodie from a California town where he lived as a boy. As a star in the Pacific Coast League, he hit 30 home runs in 1910 for the San Francisco Seals, and batted .308 over his 15 seasons in the minors. In the Major Leagues, Bodie had a couple of nice seasons, but his numbers never quite lived up to his own braggadocio. Yes, old Francesco was never shy about trumpeting his own accomplishments and abilities. He was a fitting roommate for the equally brash Babe Ruth when the two were Yankees teammates in 1920 and 1921. Bodie never got to see the Yanks win it all, as his career ended after the team’s 1921 World Series loss to the Giants, but he certainly left his mark in the Yankees’ clubhouse. One of the game’s true characters, he was known for pranks such as putting live ducks in the team photographer’s hotel room and engaging in a pasta-eating contest with an ostrich. Bodie did eventually find his way to show business, working as an electrician and bit actor at Universal Studios in Hollywood.

rank “Wildfire” Schulte was a very solid player with a classic nickname. Some claim a star-struck Schulte saw Lillian Russell perform in the play “Wildfire” and teammates teased him with the nickname. Others maintain that he owned a racehorse with the same name, and it just carried over to Schulte. In any event, he was the complete player. Signed by the Cubs out of the New York State League, Schulte made an auspicious debut in September 1904, banging out three hits. Among his banner years with the Cubs, Schulte lived up to his nickname in the 1911 season when he batted .300, led the league in RBI with 107, and assaulted National League pitching with 21 home runs, a remarkable feat during the Deadball Era. That year Schulte became the first player to top the 20 mark in doubles (30), triples (21), stolen bases (23), and home runs (21). Over the years only three other players have earned a place in the 20-20-20-20-club. The other three members? Willie Mays, Jimmy Rollins and Curtis Granderson. Schulte’s 1911 season was so spectacular that he won the Chalmers Award as MVP of the National League. The speedy Schulte also stole 233 bases over his stellar career. A bit eccentric, Schulte refused to use the heavy bats of the era, favoring a thin-handled 40-ounce bat instead, and would typically break about 50 bats each season. He also believed that if he found a hairpin on the street, it would predict his batting success, and he was often seen searching the sidewalks for hairpins before a game. Wildfire Schulte had the distinction of leading the NL in home runs in 1910 and 1911, played on four NL pennant teams (1906, 1907, 1908, 1910) and two World Series Champions (1907, 1908). By the way, he owns a .321 batting average in the World Series. Not too shabby. As his career declined, he was dealt to Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Washington, where he ended his Major League career with the Senators. Frank played and managed for another five years in the bushes until 1923. Three days before the World Series in 1949 Wildfire Schulte’s flame went out permanently. He was 67 years old.

Between 1909 and 1913, opposing batters could do a lot of things to New York Giants pitcher James Otis “Doc” Crandall. They could hit against him. Crandall surrendered more hits than innings pitched in 1911, 1912, and 1913. They could hit home runs against him. Crandall led the National League in home runs allowed with 10 in 1910, and gave up the same amount of gopher balls in 1911. They could even score against him. Crandall allowed over 80 runs scored four times in those five seasons. What opposing batters could not do to Otis Crandall was to beat him late in the game. Crandall was a specialist before specialists ever existed. He was one of baseball’s best relievers, and while his save numbers are not comparable to those of recent times, he led the National League in games finished every season between 1909 and 1913. Crandall also won 67 games during his time with the Giants. It’s no wonder that a check into the origin of Crandall’s nickname reveals that noted scribe Damon Runyon called him “Doc” because he always came into the game in an emergency situation. Crandall and the Giants went to three straight World Series (1911–1913), and each time they lost, twice to Philadelphia and once to Boston. Overall, Doc was 1–0 in postseason play with an ERA of 1.69. After his time in the majors, Crandall tore up the Pacific Coast League as a starter for the Los Angeles Angels, putting together a 249–163 record over 14 Minor League seasons. He was inducted into the Pacific League Hall of Fame in 1943. In retirement, Crandall coached in the minors and served a short stint as pitching coach for the Pittsburgh Pirates. We hold him in high regard as one of the forefathers of today’s big time closers.

Considered by many to be the first great utility man in baseball history, “Circus Solly” Hofman played just about every position at some point in his career. Known for his timely hitting, good defense and colorful character, Hofman was popular with the fans and teammates alike. He also had a reputation for speed on the basepaths and was an expert sign stealer. Some say Hofman got his nickname because of the spectacular “circus catches” that he made, but others say that the moniker was from a popular comic strip. With the Cubs for most of his career, Hofman was utility man during the Cubs three straight National League pennant years from 1906 through 1908. The Cubs were Series Champs in 1907 and 1908, and Hofman was a contributor in the post season, batting .298 in three World Series. As a matter of fact, he is credited with calling attention to Fred Merkle’s 1908 base-running error, the famous “Merkle Boner.” According to Hofman, Merkle did not touch second base. This eventually led to a one-game playoff with the Giants and the victorious Cubs won the pennant and the Series. Hofman finally became a regular in the centerfield during the 1909 season and maintained that slot for the next few years. He had some solid offensive years with his best being in 1910 when he batted .325 with 155 hits. Although popular with teammates, Hofman did butt heads a few times with manager Lee Magee in the Federal League. Magee fined Hofman for smoking, which was against team rules. This led to a confrontation after which Hofman was immediately shipped out to Buffalo. After the demise of the Federal League, he played a few games for both the Yankees and the Cubs before retiring for good. All in all, between his hitting, fielding and base stealing “Circus Solly” Hofman was no clown.

Bill Sweeney book ended his career with the Cubs in 1907 and 1914, and played with the Boston Braves. By far his best year at the plate was 1912 when he hit .344; over 70 points higher than his lifetime average.

Heinie Zimmerman could have gone down in baseball annals as one of the great third baseman, one that certainly could have been considered for entrance into the Hall of Fame. Instead, he represents everything that a player should not be. “The Great Zim,” as he was known during his days as an impact player, eventually wasted what could have been a truly great career. In 1912, Zimmerman took over as starting third baseman for the Cubs after the sudden death of Jimmy Doyle from appendicitis. That proved to be a watershed year for Zim as he led the league with his .372 batting average, 207 hits, .571 slugging percentage, 14 home runs, and in several other categories. Although he had a total of three .300 seasons, and played on the 1907 and 1908 World Series Championship teams, Zimmerman was always surrounded by controversy. The suspicion that he threw games and took bribes saddled him for his entire career, until he was finally banned for life in 1921 by Commissioner of Baseball Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis. There are many examples of indiscretion on the part of Zimmerman, including purposely muffing a rundown in the decisive game of the 1917 World Series, although some take issue with that allegation. Then, there is the fact that he batted .120 in that same Series. Zimmerman was also indirectly implicated in the 1919 Black Sox Scandal. The fatal flaw that contributed to his final demise was that Zimmerman had a problem holding onto money. He was always broke because of his penchant for spending money on extravagant things. His association with the likes of Hal Chase during his playing days and notorious gangster Dutch Schultz outside of the lines did not help his reputation either. All in all “The Great Zim” turned out to be a major black eye for the game. He later operated a mob-connected speakeasy, and worked as a plumber and steamfitter.

In sports, college or professional, individual or team, nothing captures a fan’s interest quite like a streak. This is especially true with baseball. Whether it is a team’s winning or losing streak or a player’s performance within the chalked lines, the fanfare and pressure may build each day. The fervent fan or even the uninformed follower of the national pastime may acknowledge that perhaps the greatest of all is Joe DiMaggio’s hit streak. In 1941, the Yankee Clipper stirred up quite a bit of excitement with his 56-game hitting streak. It was a testament to DiMaggio’s hitting prowess, and will always remain part of his lore But 29 years before Joltin’ Joe was smacking the horsehide around American League parks, another one of the great players in Gotham set his own streak. And it was just as impressive. Rube Marquard, who was a pitcher on the 1912 New York Giants, put together a single-season winning streak that, like DiMaggio’s, still stands. Beginning with his first start of the season, at Brooklyn on April 11, Marquard won 19 games in a row. He didn’t lose until July 8. During the streak, left-handed pitcher Marquard had an earned-run average of 1.63.

Hall of Fame catcher Roger Bresnahan claimed that Slim Sallee "had the best control of any southpaw that ever curved a ball over the plate." Pitcher Dutch Ruether said, "He [Sallee] is a wonderful pitcher. If I ever begin to learn all he knows about baseball I shall be satisfied." Baseball Magazine attributed Sallee's success to "imperturbable calm which nothing can disturb, faultless control, and back of all a scheming, crafty brain wise to all the quirks and twists of the pitcher." Despite his talents, Harry Sallee's career was checkered with training rule violations, fines, suspensions, threats of retirement, and a constant battle with alcohol that eventually ended his life. Further, he toiled in obscurity for eight and one-half seasons with what might have been the worst major league team of the Dead Ball era. Through it all, Sallee was considered one of the National League's best pitchers.

As catchers go, Art “Dutch” Wilson was pretty darn good. Wilson came up to the big leagues in a reserve role for the Giants to back up Admiral Schlei and Chief Meyers. As backup catcher, Wilson did a nice job defensively, and he even chipped in with a .303 batting average in 109 at-bats in 1911. Wilson’s big break came when he jumped to the Federal League and batted .291 and .305 respectively in 1914 and 1915. This gave him some exposure, and once the Federal League folded he was given the opportunity to get back into the National League. As is sometimes the case, Wilson’s baseball legacy is unfortunately attached to a single play. Dutch Wilson was the Cubs’ catcher in the famous “double no-hitter” game that took place between his Chicago team and the Cincinnati Reds on May 2, 1917. That day, pitcher Hippo Vaughn of the Cubs and Fred Toney of the Reds hooked up for one of the most famous pitching duels of all time. Through the first nine innings, both men threw no-hitters in an amazing performance. With the game going into extra innings, both pitchers remained on the mound. In the tenth, Vaughn finally gave up a hit to infielder Larry Kopf, which broke up his no-hitter.

One of the wildest pitchers of the era, Larry Cheney was quite good when he could control the ball. Cheney once admitted that in his early days as a pitcher, he was never sure where the ball was going. Called up to the Cubs in 1911, Cheney’s thumb was injured fielding a line drive by Zack Wheat in his third appearance, which forced him to change his pitching style, and the rest is history. Needing to develop an overhand delivery because his thumb was too weak to grip the ball properly, he perfected his spitball which became a devastating pitch. The delivery and trajectory actually allowed the ball to rise as it approached the plate, which really affected the timing of some hitters. In 1912, his first full season, Cheney led the National League with 26 wins and 28 complete games, but also led the league with 18 wild pitches. He became one of the most dominant pitchers in the league over the next two years, with 21 wins in 1913 and 20 wins in 1914, but continued to lead the league in wild pitches. A real workhorse, Cheney logged more than 300 innings per season over that three-year period. To go along with his awesome spitball, Cheney terrorized hitters because of his wildness. His 26 wild pitches in 1914 is still a Cubs record today. That wildness finally got him traded in 1915 because his new manager, Roger Bresnahan, believed that Cheney had no mound discipline. With the Brooklyn Robins in 1916, Cheney had one more very good season, winning 18 games. That year he appeared in the World Series but really had no impact. Cheney spent 1919 between Brooklyn, Boston and Philly, getting very little playing time, and his Major League career was over. Like many players during that time period, Cheney went back down to the minors for several seasons with pretty good success. He finally retired to operate an orange grove in Florida, which evidently had a good effect on him since he lived to the ripe old age of 82.

After a late start to baseball, Georgia native Jimmy Lavender enjoyed a few moments of fame over a fairly lackluster career. As a Minor Leaguer, Lavender threw plenty of innings with plenty of wins and losses. Over a five-year span from 1907 through 1911, he won 82 games, lost 94 and pitched somewhere in the vicinity of 1,500 innings. Primarily a spitball pitcher, Lavender’s durability is what finally got him to the majors. After a 19-win season in 1911 for the Providence Grays in the Eastern League, the Chicago Cubs took a chance on Lavender. The 28-year-old rookie had a good first year posting a 16–13 record, throwing over 250 innings in 1912. On the mound on July 8, 1912, against New York Giants’ ace Rube Marquard, Lavender made a name for himself when he threw a five-hitter to end Marquard’s 19-game winning streak. At the time, that was the longest winning streak by any pitcher in baseball history. This marked the high point of Lavender’s career. Over the next four seasons, Lavender would go 41–55. One other notable bright spot in his career was on August 31, 1915, when he tossed a 2–0 no-hitter against the New York Giants. Jimmy Lavender ended his career with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1916 at 33 years old and never looked back. After baseball, he retired to his home in Georgia and worked in a textile mill, living comfortably to the age of 75.

Known for his offensive prowess as well as his blazing speed. Hans Lobert was considered one of the fastest players of the Deadball Era. Over his 14-year career he batted over .300 on four occasions, and stole 316 bases. Defensively, he was very good with a tremendous arm. As a third baseman, he led the league in putouts in 1911 and 1913; and in fielding percentage when he posted .974 in 1913. Purely from the speed perspective, legend has it that Lobert actually raced a thoroughbred before a game and also beat the legendary Jim Thorpe in a 100 yard dash. Dubbed “Hans Number 2” during his rookie year with the Pirates by teammate Honus Wagner (“Hans Number 1”), Lobert did not last long with the Pirates, but the nickname stayed with him for life. His best days were with the A’s, although he did have some successful campaigns with the Reds. By the time he reached the Giants his better playing days were behind him. Plagued by a knee injury, his last two years as a player were not productive. After he retired, Lobert had eight good seasons at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point as baseball coach, followed by management stints in the Eastern League and the International League. He returned to the Bigs to manage the Phillies for two games in 1938 going 0–2, and had one full, but dismal, season managing them in 1942, posting a 42–109 record. Lobert went on to spend many years in professional baseball serving as a scout for the Giants right up until his death at the age of 86.

John Walker “Jack” Lapp (September 10, 1884 - February 6, 1920) spent nine seasons as a catcher in the Major Leagues, spending the majority of his career with the Philadelphia Athletics (1908-1915). Though he spent most of those years on the bench, Lapp was the catcher of record for Game 3 of the 1911 World Series, and had a brilliant 1915 season, with 85 hits and 16 doubles in 312 at bats. After one season with the Chicago White Sox (1916), Lapp retired with a .263 batting average, five career home runs, 416 hits, and 166 RBIs.

Rube Marquard won 103 games between 1908 and 1915, not too shabby. Unfortunately, he was on the same New York Giants staff as Christy Mathewson, who won 195 in that same time span. Both men would culminate their legacies in the Hall of Fame, but for Marquard, the early road to Cooperstown was rocky. In 1908, the Giants paid a then-astronomical sum of $11,000 to sign Marquard, but the young pitcher was mocked by sportswriters as he won just nine games in his first three seasons. Thanks to coach Wilbert Robinson, Marquard blossomed in 1911, posting a record of 24–7 with a league-leading 237 Ks. His confidence at an all-time high, Marquard won 26 games in 1912, highlighted by a still-record 19-game winning streak. Like many of baseball’s cherished records, there was a twist to Marquard’s mark. His streak began in April against the Brooklyn Dodgers and opposing pitcher Nap Rucker. It reached 19 games in July against, you guessed it, Nap Rucker and the Dodgers. Marquard actually won three more games than Mathewson in 1912, and followed that up with 23 more wins in 1913.

Born in Auburn, Indiana, in 1883, Rollie Hubert Zeider packed a bunch of really cool baseball lore into a fair to middling nine-year career. In his rookie season of 1910, Zeider hit just .217 with no home runs, but the 5-foot, 10-inch, 162-pound White Sox second baseman put the wind in the Windy City. The cyclone-fast Zeider set the rookie record for stolen bases with 49 swipes. His Major League mark would stand until 1986 when it was shattered by John Cangelosi, another South Side speedster and White Sox outfielder. Cangelosi would steal 50 bases that year ending Zeider’s small slice of immortality. Zeider finished in the top 10 in steals three different times in his career. He was also among the league leaders in errors on three occasions, but was widely recognized for his uncommon range in the field. Zeider’s most famous nickname is “Bunions,” a moniker that essentially came from a disease. Legend has it that Zeider was on the receiving end of a patented Ty Cobb spiking that severed a bunion. The infection resulted in a case of blood poisoning, hence, a rather painful and somewhat disgusting nickname. Zeider also holds the distinction of playing for a Chicago franchise three different times in three different leagues: the White Sox in the American League, the Chi-Feds/Whales in the Federal League, and the Cubs in the National League. Zeider’s overall career is hardly noteworthy, but some fun factoids make him one of our favorite players in the collection.

Known as one of the feistiest players in baseball history, Edd Roush channeled that energy into a Hall of Fame career. An old-timer was quoted in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1919 saying that Roush was more like the fiery old Baltimore Orioles of the 1890's than any other player in the National League. The observer stressed Roush's versatility and his knack at doing the unexpected when it would help the most. John McGraw, in a similar vein, once said, "that Hoosier moves with the indifference of an alley cat." Pat Moran claimed that "all that fellow has to do is wash his hands, adjust his cap and he's in shape to hit. He's the great individualist in the game." Roush led his team, the Cincinnati Reds, to the World's Championship in 1919. A left-handed hitter with a lifetime average of .323 in 18 seasons, Edd Roush was the best place hitter in the National League toward the end of the Deadball Era, winning batting championships in 1917 and 1919 and finishing second in 1918. "Some batters, and good ones too, scoff at the whole theory of place hitting, calling it a myth," he said. "They are wrong, however." Roush wielded a short, thick-handled bat that weighed 48 ounces, one of the heaviest ever in baseball. He snapped the bat at the ball with his arms and placed line drives to all parts of the field by shifting his feet after the ball left the pitchers hand and altering the timing of his swing. "Place hitting is in a sense glorified bunting," he said. "I only take a half swing at the ball, and the weight of the bat rather than my swing is what drives it." On defense center fielder Roush combined excellent speed with an ability to turn his back on the baseball and run to the spot where it would drop to earth. Edd was considered by many to be the premier defensive outfielder of the National League during the Deadball era. He was often compared defensively with Hall of Famer Tris Speaker.

A life in baseball is how one might best describe the life of Fred Mitchell. He pitched in the very first game ever played by the Boston Red Sox franchise (an exhibition game in Charlottesville, Virginia), and 18 years later managed the Chicago Cubs against the Red Sox in the 1918 World Series. His major-league playing career ran from 1901 to 1913; he appeared as a pitcher in 97 games and recorded a 31-49 record with a 4.10 earned run average. At the plate, he was a .210 hitter in 572 at-bats spread across 201 games. At one time or another, he played every infield position, the outfield, and even caught 62 games for the New York Highlanders in 1910. He was one of the few who played for the Red Sox, the Boston Braves, and the Yankees (albeit while the teams were known as the Americans, Braves, and Highlanders.) Mitchell managed the Cubs for four years (1917-1920) and the Braves for the three succeeding years (1921-1923), then resumed work as baseball coach at Harvard, for which he worked until he retired in 1939. He was the manager of Harvard’s team from 1926-1938.

David James Bancroft (April 20, 1891 - October 9, 1972) is considered one of the top fielders in the history of baseball. During 16 seasons (all in the National League) with the Philadelphia Phillies (1915-1920), the New York Giants (1920-1923), the Boston Braves (1924-1927) and the Brooklyn Robins (1928-1929), Bancroft had a .944 fielding percentage with 4,623 putouts in 1,873 games. “Dave Bancroft set a major league record for chances handled by a shortstop in a season – 984 in 1922.” The career National League shortstop also batted .279 with 2,004 hits and 591 RBI. Bancroft earned the nickname “Beauty” by shouting it to opposing players after good pitches. The Veterans Committee elected David James Bancroft to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

Edgar Charles “Sam” Rice (February 20, 1890 - October 13, 1974) is best known for a controversial catch he made in the 1925 World Series of a would-be home run from Earl Smith. Rice caught the ball before the fence, and then went over the wall due to momentum and the controversy began. Rice enjoyed “the mystery” fans and media made of the play and recounted the incident in a letter read after his death writing, “At no time did I lose possession of the ball.” Rice was a consistent batter hitting over .300 15 times and possessed incredible speed, stealing 351 bases in his 20-year career. Rice played 19 seasons with the Washington Senators (1915-1933) and one with the Cleveland Indians (1934) compiling 2,987 hits, 1,515 runs, 918 RBI and 351 stolen bases with a .322 career batting average. Rice would frequently stretch singles into doubles with his speed. He helped lead the Senators to three American League pennants in 1924, 1925 and 1933 and was a member of the 1924 World Series championship team. The Veterans Committee elected Edgar Charles “Sam” Rice to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1963.

Charles John Grimm (August 28, 1898 - November 15, 1983) had a unique ability to get exceptional performances out of average players while his stars exceeded their potential. Grimm played twenty seasons, primarily for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1919-1924) and the Chicago Cubs (1925-1936). Charlie was a solid, skilled first baseman with a love for cutting up and tomfoolery, which he enjoyed with Pirate teammates Rabbit Maranville and Cotton Tierney, much to the dismay of management. In 1925, he was traded to the Cubs with Maranville where they could continue their foolish behavior. Grimm had six seasons hitting above the .300 mark, four with the Cubs. In 1932, Jolly Cholly was named player/manager immediately guiding the club to the National League pennant. He would remain player/manager until 1938 and take them to the World Series once again in 1935. Charlie Grimm ended his playing career with a .290 batting average adding 2,299 hits, 908 runs, 394 doubles and 1,077 RBI. As an everyday manager, he again took the Cubs to the NL pennant in 1945, but never achieved the ultimate prize of a World Series victory. Charlie managed for 19 seasons with the Cubs (1932-1938, 1944-1949, 1960) the Boston Braves (1952 – their final year in Boston) and the remained on with the club as they became the Milwaukee Braves (1953-1956). After retiring from any playing field capacity, Charlie spent 15 more seasons with the Cubs franchise in various roles. After his death in 1983, Grimm’s widow scattered his ashes over his beloved Wrigley Field.

How good was Grover “Old Pete” Alexander? He won 28 as a rookie, and had 373 wins over his career. League leader in strikeouts six times, Alexander struck out 2,198 batters and had a 2.56 career ERA. He also led the league on many occasions in shutouts and complete games. That is exactly why “Old Pete” makes it into our rotation of the four best pitchers in the Collection. Alexander ranks right behind the legendary Cy Young and Walter Johnson in wins, and has always been considered in the top 10 pitchers of all time. With the Phillies, Alexander had three 20-win seasons, three 30-win seasons, and won the National League Pitcher’s Triple Crown in 1915 and 1916 before he was sold to the Cubs out of fear that he would be drafted into service for World War I, which he was. In 1918, while serving in France, Alexander experienced injuries to his ears and to his right arm, was plagued with shell shock, and developed epilepsy. All of this, combined with the fact that he became a heavy drinker, caused problems when he returned to the mound. As a matter of fact, it has been reported that “Old Pete” sometimes took the mound in an inebriated state. He managed to have several good seasons with the Cubs, winning the Triple Crown again in 1920, but there were problems with behavior both on and off the field. He was finally sold to the Cards. Alexander pitched two complete game wins (Games 2 and 6) for the Cards in the 1926 World Series, and then in Game 7 he was sent in as a relief pitcher in the seventh inning. It is purported that Alexander was in tough shape from drinking heavily the previous night, but he held the Yanks scoreless for the final two innings. He had one more 20-win season, and was then out of baseball, pitching for the House of David for several years. Grover Cleveland Alexander was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1938.

David James Bancroft (April 20, 1891 - October 9, 1972) is considered one of the top fielders in the history of baseball. During 16 seasons (all in the National League) with the Philadelphia Phillies (1915-1920), the New York Giants (1920-1923), the Boston Braves (1924-1927) and the Brooklyn Robins (1928-1929), Bancroft had a .944 fielding percentage with 4,623 putouts in 1,873 games. “Dave Bancroft set a major league record for chances handled by a shortstop in a season – 984 in 1922.” The career National League shortstop also batted .279 with 2,004 hits and 591 RBI. Bancroft earned the nickname “Beauty” by shouting it to opposing players after good pitches. The Veterans Committee elected David James Bancroft to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

Charles Henry “Charlie” Root (March 17, 1899 - November 5, 1970) surrendered Babe Ruth’s alleged “Called Shot” in the 1932 World Series. Root pitched 17 seasons with the St. Louis Browns (1923) and the Chicago Cubs (1926-1941). In 1927, he led the National League in wins (26), games (48), innings pitched (309.0), walks (117) and batters faced (1,316). From 1926-1937, Charlie won 13 or more games in ten seasons. He played on four National League champion Cubs teams (1929, 1932, 1935, 1938) and was a five-time consideration for the Most Valuable Player Award. Charlie Root finished his career with a 201-160 record with 177 complete games, 1,459 strikeouts, 21 shutouts and a 3.59 career ERA.

Perce Leigh “Pat” Malone (September 25, 1902 - May 13, 1943) began his career with seven straight losses, then finished the year with an 18-13 record in 1928. His next two seasons were even more impressive as he led the National League in wins each year (22, 20 respectively) as well as leading the league in shutouts (5) and strikeouts (166) in 1929. Pat pitched ten seasons in the Major Leagues with the Chicago Cubs (1928-1934) and the New York Yankees (1935-1937) posting eight seasons with ten or more wins. As he served in relief later in his career, Malone led the American League in 1936 with nine saves. He appeared in three World Series – 1929 and 1932 with the Cubs and 1936 with the Yankees – posting a 0-3 record in six games and winning the 1936 Word Series title. Pat Malone ended his career following the 1937 season after compiling a 134-92 record, 115 complete games, 107 games finished, 15 shutouts, 26 saves and 1,024 strikeouts with a 3.74 career ERA in 357 appearances.

William Harold Terry (October 30, 1898 - January 9, 1989) remains the last player in the National League to hit over the .400-mark when he hit .401 in 1930, hitting a record tying 254 hits. Bill Terry played first base for 14 seasons with the New York Giants from 1923-1936. Terry batted .320 or better for nine straight years while clouting 200 or more hits over six of those campaigns. Bill Terry was also a top first baseman in the National League, posting a career .990 fielding percentage. A perennial MVP candidate (he never won), Terry finished his career with 2,193 hits, 1,120 runs, 1,078 RBI and a .341 batting average. In 1932, Bill Terry took over the helm of the Giants from legendary Hall of Fame manager John McGraw. In his first full season as manager, Terry led the Giants to a World Series championship in 1933 and added two more National League pennants in 1936 and 1937. William Harold Terry was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1954.

Leon Allen “Goose” Goslin (October 16, 1900 - May 15, 1971) drove in 100 runs or more in 11 seasons during his 18-year career. Goslin was a rugged and powerful clutch hitter who batted above the .300 mark 11 times, finishing his career with a .316 average. Playing left field for the Washington Senators (1921-1930, 1933, 1938) the St. Louis Browns (1931-1932) and the Detroit Tigers (1934-1937). In 1924 en route to the World Series victory, Goose hit .344 during the season as well as the World Series adding three home runs and seven RBI in the fall classic. The 1924 season was a career year for Goslin tallying 199 hits, 129 RBI, 299 total bases and 17 triples. Goose Goslin was a member of five American League pennant winners and two World Series champions (Washington – 1924 and Detroit – 1935). In Detroit, Goslin was one member of the “G-Men” pairing him with fellow Hall of Famers Hank Greenberg and Charley Gehringer. Goose Gosling retired with 2,735 hits, 1,483 runs scored, 1,609 RBI, 248 home runs and a career .316 batting average. The Veterans Committee elected Leon Allen “Goose” Goslin to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1968.

Hazen Shirley “Kiki” Cuyler (August 30, 1898 - February 11, 1950) played 18 seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1921-1927), the Chicago Cubs (1928-1935), the Cincinnati Reds (1935-1937 and the Brooklyn Dodgers (1938). With great speed and superb hitting ability, Cuyler collected 2,299 hits with 1,065 RBI, scoring 1.305 runs stealing 328 bases and batting a career .321 average. Consistently hitting over .300, Cuyler topped the .350-mark four times highlighted by his 1925 career year, when he hit .357, scored 144 runs leading the league with 26 triples en route to his only World Series title. Four times, Cuyler led the league in stolen bases, once in doubles and once in triples. The Veterans Committee elected Haven Shirley “Kiki” Cuyler to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1968.

Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 - August 25, 1984) was one of the most dominant pitchers of the 1920 for the New York Yankees posting an astonishing 157-98 from 1921-1930. Hoyt pitched 21 seasons in the major leagues primarily with the Yankees (1921-1930) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1933-1937) compiling a record of 237-182 with 1,206 strikeouts and a career 3.59. Nicknamed the Merry Mortician due to his off-season position as an undertaker, Hoyt was a key element in the 1920s Yankee dynasty as they captured 6 American League pennants and three World Series titles (1923, 1927, 1928). He added another AL pennant with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1931. Waite Hoyt retired in 1938 and began a career in broadcasting with the Brooklyn Dodgers, ending up as play-by-play announcer for the Cincinnati Reds for 24 years until 1965. After many years in Alcoholics Anonymous, Hoyt reminisced that he could have topped the 300-win mark had it not been for his excessive drinking. The Veterans Committee elected Waite Charles Hoyt to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.

Willie Edward Kamm (February 2, 1900 - December 21, 1988) played third base for 13 seasons with the Chicago White Sox (1923-1931) and the Cleveland Indians (1931-1935). Kamm finished his career with 1,643 hits including 348 doubles, 802 runs, 826 RBI and a .281 career batting average.

Joseph Edward Cronin (October 12, 1906 - September 7, 1984) enjoyed a 50-year career in baseball like not others before him nor after serving as a player, manager, general manager, executive and league president. Joe was born in San Francisco six months after the 1906 earthquake that claimed much of his family's belongings. However, growing up in the hot bed of baseball talent in and around San Francisco during the early 1900s, Cronin overcame obstacles and became a very gifted athlete. As a six-foot a tall 14-year old, Joe won the boys' city tennis championship in 1920 and then led Mission High School and Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep to city baseball championships in 1922 and 1924, respectively. Despite being a huge fan of the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League, given that the nearest Major League team was the St. Louis Cardinals, 2,000 miles away, Cronin signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925. After three years in the Pirates organization and little chance to land a big league spot on the left side of the infield with two of the best in the game in Glenn Wright at Shortstop and Pie Traynor at third, Washington Senators scout Joe Engel purchased Cronin for $7,500. Despite owner Clark Griffith’s disdain for the buy, Joe was able to crack the Senators lineup and bettered his numbers each of his first three seasons in D.C. ultimately setting career-highs in 1930 with a .346 average, 203 hits, 127 runs scored, 17 stolen bases and 126 RBI in a league leading 154 games. The Sporting News and baseball writers named him the league’s most valuable player. Joe finished in the top ten in MVP voting in each season from 1931 to 1933 and started the first three MLB All-Star Games at shortstop for the American League. He was a seven-time All-Star and finished second in MVP voting to Jimmie Foxx in 1933 as Foxx posted extraordinary numbers.

While Mel Ott did not fit the description of a prototypical power hitter, his tenacity and unique swing helped him reach the elusive 500 Home Run Club. With an uncanny ability to pull the ball, Ott was able to take advantage of the short porch in right field at the Polo Grounds, crushing 511 homers in his career. It was only 257 feet down the line! At the time of his retirement, Ott was the NL leader in career RBI (1,860), runs scored (1,859) and walks (1,708). Featured on two different cards in the set, #s 127 and 207, you can see the mean glare on Ott's face. The high-number Ott is the more difficult of the two cards and very difficult to find well-centered. With the stunning red background, it is also more visually appealing, yet both are important cards. Ott was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Charles Henry “Charlie” Root (March 17, 1899 - November 5, 1970) surrendered Babe Ruth’s alleged “Called Shot” in the 1932 World Series. Root pitched 17 seasons with the St. Louis Browns (1923) and the Chicago Cubs (1926-1941). In 1927, he led the National League in wins (26), games (48), innings pitched (309.0), walks (117) and batters faced (1,316). From 1926-1937, Charlie won 13 or more games in ten seasons. He played on four National League champion Cubs teams (1929, 1932, 1935, 1938) and was a five-time consideration for the Most Valuable Player Award. Charlie Root finished his career with a 201-160 record with 177 complete games, 1,459 strikeouts, 21 shutouts and a 3.59 career ERA.

Charles Henry “Charlie” Root (March 17, 1899 - November 5, 1970) surrendered Babe Ruth’s alleged “Called Shot” in the 1932 World Series. Root pitched 17 seasons with the St. Louis Browns (1923) and the Chicago Cubs (1926-1941). In 1927, he led the National League in wins (26), games (48), innings pitched (309.0), walks (117) and batters faced (1,316). From 1926-1937, Charlie won 13 or more games in ten seasons. He played on four National League champion Cubs teams (1929, 1932, 1935, 1938) and was a five-time consideration for the Most Valuable Player Award. Charlie Root finished his career with a 201-160 record with 177 complete games, 1,459 strikeouts, 21 shutouts and a 3.59 career ERA.

Gordon Stanley “Mickey” Cochrane (April 6, 1903 - June 28, 1962) continues to sit atop the list of the greatest catchers in Major League Baseball history. Cochrane helped lead the Philadelphia Athletics to three American League pennants and two World Series championships (1929, 1930) and the Detroit Tigers to two pennants and one World Series title (1935). Mickey Cochrane compiled a .320 batting average, had 1,652 hits and drove in 832 runs in his 13-year career the Philadelphia Athletics (1925-1933) and Detroit Tigers (1934-1937). He was considered one of the best catchers in the game at the plate and behind the plate and retired with a .985 career fielding percentage. Cochrane’s career was halted when he was hit in the head by a pitch that nearly killed him in 1937. Gordon Stanley Cochrane was elected tot the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.

Lyle Forrest “Bud” Tinning (March 12, 1906 - January 17, 1961) put together one of the greatest seasons on the mound that minor league pitcher had ever produced when he went 24-2 in 29 games with a 3.14 ERA for the Des Moines Demons of the Western League in 1931. In 1932, he made his Major League rookie debut with the Chicago Cubs at the age of 26 going 5-3 in his first year. On the 1932 World Series, Tinning appeared in two games, shutting out the New York Yankees in 2.1 innings, but the Cubs still fell to the Bronx Bombers in a four game sweep. Bud’s .684 winning percentage in his sophomore season led the National League as he went 13-6 with 59 Ks for the Cubs. He pitched four years in the Major Leagues with the Cubs (1932-1934) and the St. Louis Cardinals (1935). In 12 years of minor league ball, Tinning went 103-86 with a 2.68 ERA. As a Major Leaguer, he went 22-15 with 13 complete games, four shutouts, 135 strikeouts and a 3.19 career ERA in 99 games and 35 starts.

The Hall of Fame career of Walter James Vincent “Rabbit” Maranville is not merely about statistics. His career batting average was an ordinary .258 and he slugged just .340. He slammed a scant 28 career home runs and hit over .300 just once. What Maranville did do, at a tireless pace, was show up to the ballpark every day and drive opponents crazy. He consistently approached or surpassed 150 games and led the league in plate appearances (746) and at-bats (672) with the Pirates in 1922. In two World Series, 1914 with the victorious Braves and 1928 with the losing Cardinals, Maranville batted .308. Now, about that nickname. If you check out any photo of Maranville, you would probably jump, or in this case, hop to the conclusion that the name Rabbit came from his rather large ears. Maranville related that the moniker actually came from a family friend describing his penchant for bounding and jumping about. With 2,605 career hits, Maranville was more than a diamond version of Peter Cottontail. In 1913, in his first game as the starting shortstop for the Braves, Maranville had three hits against Giants legend Christy Mathewson. Clutch hits were his specialty in leading Boston to a world title in 1914. For part of 1925, Maranville served as player-manager for the Cubs, posting a record of 23–30. In 1929, he returned to the Braves after an eight-year absence and, in 1929 and 1930, posted two of his best career batting averages, .284 and .281. He also continued to show up and drive opponents crazy, playing in over 140 games and registering close to or more than 600 plate appearances between 1929 and 1933. Known for his battling style with umpires and opponents alike, Maranville retired after the 1935 season and managed in the minors through 1941. He taught the game to youngsters as director of baseball clinics sponsored by the New York Journal-American newspaper. Maranville died at the age of 62 in 1954, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame later that year. This Rabbit surely enjoyed a 24-“carrot” gold career.

Lloyd James Waner (March 16, 1906 - July 22, 1982) played 18 seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927-1941) alongside his brother Paul in the outfield before bouncing around the National League to finish his career. Lloyd was known as a slap hitter with tremendous consistency, compiling 223 hits in his first season with the Pirates while batting .355 and striking out only 23 times. Lloyd Waner retired with a .316 batting average with 2,459 hits, 1,201 runs scored, 598 RBI when only striking out a measly 173 times in 7,772 at-bats. Waner was a member of the 1927 National League pennant winning Pirates and batted .400 against the New York Yankees in a losing effort. He and his brother Paul hold the record for brothers with the most hits with 5,611. The Veterans Committee elected Lloyd James Waner to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1967.

Harold Joseph “Pie” Traynor (November 11, 1898 - March 16, 1972) was considered the best third baseman of his era from 1920-1937. Traynor manned the hot corner for the Pittsburgh Pirates for 17 seasons batting .320 for his career with 10 plus seasons above the .300-mark. Traynor was so adept at the plate that he never struck out more than 28 times in a single season throughout his career. “Pie”, for his love of pastries as a boy, was a highly skilled fielder, posting a .947fielding percentage with 2,288 putouts and 308 double plays. Traynor was a key element in the Pirates success in the 1920s and helped them capture the 1925 World Series championship. He was selected to two All-Star games and finished his career with a .320 batting average, 2,416 hits, 1,183 runs scored and 1,273 RBI with 158 stolen bases. Interestingly, Harold was a health nut and never learned to drive for fear that he would cease walking to the park. Harold Joseph “Pie” Traynor was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1948.

Alfonso Ramon Lopez (August 20, 1908 - October 30, 2005) held the record for most games behind the plate with 1,918 for more than 40 years before is was broken by Bob Boone in 1987 and again by fellow Hall of Famer Gary Carter. Lopez was a solid, defensive catcher primarily with the Dodgers, Bees and Pirates from 1928-1947, but was more comfortable and successful in the dugout guiding Cleveland to the 1954 American League pennant and the White Sox to the 1959 AL pennant (their first since 1919). Lopez was the only manager to interrupt the New York Yankees incredible run of AL pennant from 1949-1964. Lopez’ Indians team finished second behind the Yankees in every other season and during his tenure with the White Sox, they never had a losing season. Al Lopez retired after 17 seasons with a record of 1,422-1,026. The Veterans Committee elected Alfonso Ramon Lopez to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977.

It was fourth down and four yards to go in the final quarter, the score tied at 14-14. Southern Methodist lined up in kick formation at the Texas Christian 37-yard line. Unexpectedly, Bob Finley broke from his punting stance and lofted a long pass toward the goal as Bobby Wilson raced across the chalk lines. Wilson grabbed the falling football on the four, and tumbled into the end zone for the score that gave SMU a 20- 14 victory which many feel was the most important in Southern Methodist gridiron history. Why? Because it led to a Rose Bowl appearance, and despite a 7-0 loss to Stanford, brought $85,000 in revenue - the exact amount needed to pay off the mortgage on the new SMU Stadium. Thus, Wilson's TD catch became known as the $85,000 touchdown. Bobby was one of the game's top little men, an All-America choice in both 1934 and 1935. Coached by Ray Morrison and Matty Bell, his long runs from scrimmage, his punt and kickoff returns and his team leadership not only helped SMU to a 12-game winning streak, but made him the first Southwest back to win All-America laurels. In 1934, Bobby led the Southwest Conference in scoring (48 points), then repeated the feat with 72 points in 1935, when SMU won the Southwest Conference Championship. Wilson was born August 16, 1913, in Nacogdoches Texas. He died May 15, 1999 in Brenham, Texas.

Henry Emmett “Heinie” Manush (July 20, 1901 - May 12, 1971) was a hit making machine, twice leading the American League in hits (1928, 1933). Manush played the majority of his 17-year career with the Detroit Tigers (1923-1927) and the Washington senators (1930-1935) accumulating impressive career totals of 2,524 hits including 761 extra-base hits, 1,287 runs scored and a .330 batting average. Heinie finished in the top five for MVP voting four times and placing third twice in 1932 and 1933 when Jimmie Foxx won back-to-back honors. Manush was an excellent fielder as well, posting a career .979 fielding percentage and eventually taking over center field for the Tigers as Ty Cobb’s playing days ended. The Veterans Committee elected Henry Emmett “Heinie” Manush to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.

Hazen Shirley “Kiki” Cuyler (August 30, 1898 - February 11, 1950) played 18 seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1921-1927), the Chicago Cubs (1928-1935), the Cincinnati Reds (1935-1937 and the Brooklyn Dodgers (1938). With great speed and superb hitting ability, Cuyler collected 2,299 hits with 1,065 RBI, scoring 1.305 runs stealing 328 bases and batting a career .321 average. Consistently hitting over .300, Cuyler topped the .350-mark four times highlighted by his 1925 career year, when he hit .357, scored 144 runs leading the league with 26 triples en route to his only World Series title. Four times, Cuyler led the league in stolen bases, once in doubles and once in triples. The Veterans Committee elected Haven Shirley “Kiki” Cuyler to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1968.

Stanley Camfield Hack (December 6, 1909 - December 15, 1979) was a speedy base stealer during the 1930s and 1940s and from 1938 to 1945 was considered among the best players in the league as he garnered Most Valuable Player award consideration each year. The talented third baseman hit .352 in the minor leagues in 1931 before being called up to the Chicago Cubs big club in 1932, where he remained for his entire 16-year career (1932-1947). Stan was a fixture at third on the highly talented Cubs team that featured Hall of Famers Gabby Hartnett behind the plate, Billy Herman at second and Kiki Cuyler as well as numerous All-Stars and Cub greats. Primarily a leadoff hitter, Hack was frequently among the league leaders in on-base percentage and once on base showed that he was also among the league’s elite in base stealing. He led the league twice in stolen bases and stole ten or more bases eight times, topping 20 in 1940. Stan also led the league in games once, hits twice and plate appearances three times. Hack’s best season came in 1938 when he led the league in plate appearances (707) and stolen bases (16) while batting .320 with 195 hits including 11 triples and 67 RBI to earn his first of five All-Star selections. It also began a string of eight straight years where he finished among the top 30 players in MVP voting. He appeared in four World Series with the Cubs (1932, 1935, 1938, 1945). Stan Hack finished his playing career with a .301 career batting average, 2,193 hits, 1,239 runs, 642 RBI and 165 stolen bases. He led the National league five times in putouts and tice in fielding and assists to end his career with a .959 fielding percentage. Following his playing days, Stan was tapped to lead the Cubs once again from the clubhouse as the manager from 1954 to 1956. He also managed the St. Louis Cardinals for the 1958 season and compiled a 199-272 record in four season and 475 career games at the helm as a big league skipper.

Howard Earl Averill (May 21, 1902 - August 16, 1983) holds the distinction of being the first American League player to hit a home run in his very first Major League at-bat. Averill posted a career .318 batting average, had 2,019 hits and drove in 1,164 runs. Averill’s played centerfield for the Cleveland Indians (1929-1939), Detroit Tigers (1939-1940) and the Boston Braves (1941). During his Indian days, Earl was selected for six All Star appearances from 1933-1938 and remains today among the Indians leaders in total bases, RBI, runs and triples. The Veterans Committee elected Howard Earl Averill to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

Ernest Natali Lombardi (April 6, 1908 - September 26, 1977) was once referred to as “the slowest man to ever play major league baseball well.” His lack of speed was, however, overshadowed by his legendary and powerful line drives as well as long shots over fence. He was considered one of the greatest defensive catcher’s of his era as well, appearing in 100 or more game with the Cincinnati Reds in ten consecutive seasons. Lombardi primarily played for the Reds (1932-1941) and the Giants (1943-1947) during his 17-year career. Ernie Lombardi was renowned for his lead feet, but that did not deter him from being selected eight All-Star games and was not a factor as he won the 1938 National League Most Valuable Player award. He also helped the Reds win the 1939 NL pennant and 1940 World Series title. In 1938, Ernie holds the distinction of catching Johnny Vander Meer’s consecutive no-hitters against the Boston Bees and Brooklyn Dodgers, respectively. Ernie Lombardi retired with a career .306 batting average with 1,792 hits, 190 home runs, 602 runs scored and 990 RBI. The Veterans Committee elected Ernest Natali Lombardi to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986.

William Benjamin Chapman (December 25, 1908 - July 7, 1993) was the very first American League batter in the inaugural 1933 All-Star game. Ben Chapman was a speedy, fiery player on a Yankee team built around power with teammates such as Ruth, Gehrig, Dickey and DiMaggio. He led the American League in stolen bases four times, was a four-time All-Star selection and led the league once in triples (1934). Chapman played 15 seasons, primarily with the Yankees (1930-1936) and was a member of the 1932 World Series championship team. After bouncing around the AL for a few seasons, Ben spent some time in the minor leagues and the military during World War II before returning to the big leagues as a pitcher with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Ben Chapman retired having posted a career .302 batting average, with 1,958 hits, 407 doubles, 107 triples, 1,144 runs, 287 stolen bases and 977 RBI. Chapman posted an 8-6 record for the Dodgers and Phillies in his final playing years. Chapman is often remembered for his racial objections to the inclusion of Jackie Robinson in baseball when he was manager of the Philadelphia Phillies. His racial slurs and baiting caused a backlash of bad publicity and actually boosted Robinson’s cause as teammates and many others stood behind the embattled Dodger first baseman. Chapman retired with a 196-276 record in four years as manager of the Phillies.

Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 - November 21, 1988), along with Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox pitcher Lefty Grove, were in a league of their in the 1930s as Hubbell strung together five consecutive 20-win seasons, leading the National League three times while Grove led the American League four times in victories. Carl was born in rural Missouri, but then moved to Oklahoma where he graduated from Meeker High School before heading to the oil fields. Hubbell pitched for the company’s baseball team and was soon playing for Cushing in the Oklahoma State League. In 1925, Carl joined the Oklahoma City Indians of the Western League where he went 17-13 in his first season. This was where Carl developed his patented screwball, or reverse-curve (later referred to as the “fadeaway”), as he was trying to turn the ball over, giving it a sinking motion.

heodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was one of the most consistent pitchers from 1923-1946 averaging more than twelve wins a year for 21 seasons. Despite Ted Lyons playing his entire career with the lowly Chicago White Sox, he compiled a record of 260-230 with 1,073 strikeouts and a 3.67 ERA. Due to an unusual scheduling glitch, in 1942 Lyons pitched virtually every Sunday gaining the name “Sunday Teddy” and going 14-6 with 20 complete games. His arsenal of pitches included a cut-fastball, knuckleball, curveball and changeup with expert control and command of them all. In August of 1926, Lyons utilized his pitches as he no-hit the Boston Red Sox on 1 hour and 7 minutes. Lyons was selected to the 1939 All-Star game. Theodore Amar Lyons was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Theodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was one of the most consistent pitchers from 1923-1946 averaging more than twelve wins a year for 21 seasons. Despite Ted Lyons playing his entire career with the lowly Chicago White Sox, he compiled a record of 260-230 with 1,073 strikeouts and a 3.67 ERA. Due to an unusual scheduling glitch, in 1942 Lyons pitched virtually every Sunday gaining the name “Sunday Teddy” and going 14-6 with 20 complete games. His arsenal of pitches included a cut-fastball, knuckleball, curveball and changeup with expert control and command of them all. In August of 1926, Lyons utilized his pitches as he no-hit the Boston Red Sox on 1 hour and 7 minutes. Lyons was selected to the 1939 All-Star game. Theodore Amar Lyons was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Joyner Clifford "Jo-Jo" White (June 1, 1909 – October 9, 1986) was an American center fielder in professional baseball. He played nine seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1932–38), Philadelphia Athletics (1943–44), and Cincinnati Reds (1944). Born in Red Oak, Georgia, Joyner White was known as "Jo-Jo" because of the way he pronounced the name of his native state of Georgia. The 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 165 lb (75 kg) White batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He began his playing career in minor league baseball in 1928 and after four full years of apprenticeship, he made the Tigers' roster at age 22 at the outset of the 1932 season.

Richard Benjamin Ferrell (October 12, 1905 - July 27, 1995) was among the best catchers in the Major Leagues for two decades from 1929-1947, frequently being the receiver of the unconventional and unpredictable knuckleball. During his time with the Washington in 1944, Ferrell handled the entire knuckleball throwing Senators staff, thus becoming the only catcher in history to do so. Rick possessed and exceptional arm and often led the league in fielding percentage, putouts, assists and caught stealing, but due to his knuckleballing battery-mates, also led in errors and passed balls. Ferrell was a threat at the plate as well, hitting over .300 four times in his 18-year career. Rick Ferrell retired with a .984 fielding percentage, 1,692 hits, 734 RBI and a career .281 batting average. He was selected to eight All-Star games and was held in such high regard by Connie Mack, played the entire 1933 All-Star game behind the plate as fellow Hall of Famers Bill Dickey and Mickey Cochrane rode the bench. The Veterans Committee elected Richard Benjamin Ferrell to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

Playing on seven different teams across 13 major league seasons, outfielder Tuck Stainback acquired a reputation as a player “who ought to be great, but never will be.” The weight of expectations affected him, as it did many other touted talents.1 During the 1930s, Stainback was considered one of the fastest runners in the National League. Simultaneously, he was also regarded as one of the most absentminded players, based on his habit of often leaving the locker room without watch, wallet or keys. Stainback was generally acknowledged to possess one of the finest throwing arms in the game — he was said to have “thrown out more men than a beer-garden bouncer”2 — yet he was also known for often throwing to the wrong base. These lapses prompted sportswriter Warren Brown to reference him as “a man of suspended animation,” a friendly phrase he used to describe Tuck’s eccentricity.3 Stainback hit over .300 as a big-league rookie in 1934 but never did so again. And though he had shown some power in the minors, he was a singles hitter in the majors, hitting just 17 homers and slugging just .333 while batting .259 for his career. He didn’t strike out much but walked very seldom, and despite his speed, he stole just 27 bases.

James Leroy Bottomley (April 23, 1900 - December 11, 1959) was one of two players, the other being Lou Gehrig, in baseball history to collect 150 or more double, triples and home runs in his career. Referred to as Sunny Jim for his up-beat and happy demeanor, Bottomley played 16 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals (1922-1932), the Cincinnati Reds (1933-1935) and the St. Louis Browns (1936-1937). Jim was the first player in baseball to win the Most Valuable Player award that came up through a team’s farm system. A career first baseman, he helped lead the Cardinals to four National League pennants and two World Series victories (1926, 1931). Jim Bottomley retired with 2,313 hits, 1,422 RBI, 219 home runs and had a career .310 batting average. The Veterans Committee elected James Leroy Bottomley to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

James Emory “Jimmie” Foxx (October 22, 1907 - July 21, 1967) was not only one of the most imposing figures in baseball, but he backed it up with versatility, durability and strength. Jimmie grew up on a farm in Sudlersville, Maryland, where his extensive and often grueling chores helped to define and build his tremendously powerful physique. After his grandfather regaled 10-year old Jimmie with tales of his exploits during the Civil War, Foxx attempted to run away and join the Army, but was turned away. He had to settle for school, where he proved to be a good student and in athletics where he excelled in track and field and soccer as well as baseball. Expansion of the Eastern Shore League to nearby Easton brought manager and Hall of Famer Frank “Home Run” Baker to Foxx’s neck of the woods and Baker took notice of the strapping farm boy’s power, signing the high school junior immediately. Though Foxx returned to finish his senior year, he dropped out to attend the Philadelphia Athletics spring training, but was eventually sent to the Providence Grays of the Eastern League for seasoning, considering he was only 17. Jimmie returned to Philadelphia in 1926, but road the bench for much of the 1926 and 1927 seasons. The 1928 season offered more opportunity for Foxx as he played regularly either at first or third.

Though contemporary newspaper reports typically referred to Hall of Fame outfielder Hazen Cuyler by his given name, the right-hander is more easily recognized by one of the most unique, yet most often mispronounced nicknames in baseball history: Kiki. “It came from shortening my name,” Cuyler explained about acquiring the moniker (which rhymes with “eye-eye”) as a minor leaguer in 1923. “Every time I went after a fly ball, the shortstop would holler ‘Cuy’ and the second baseman would echo ‘Cuy’ and pretty soon the fans were shouting ‘Cuy Cuy.’ The papers shortened it ‘Kiki.’”1 According to another story, the sobriquet had less glamorous origins: It arose as a way to mock Cuyler, who struggled to overcome his stuttering. Cuyler had been dead for almost two decades and his accomplishments had largely faded with memory when the Veterans Committee elected him to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1968. But during his heyday in the mid-1920s through mid-1930s with the pennant-winning Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs, Cuyler was considered one of the most popular and most exciting players in baseball. Blessed with uncanny speed, quick reflexes, and a powerful arm, Cuyler was a solid line-drive hitter with surprising power. In an 18-year career (1921-1938) that was also marred by injuries and an enduring controversy with a manager, he batted .321, collected 2,299 hits, led the major leagues in stolen bases four times, and had a legacy-defining, Series-winning hit in Game Seven of the 1925 World Series for the Pirates.

The New York Yankees of 1946 had many of the same stars who made them the dominant team of the pre-World War II years, but they finished in third place, seventeen games behind the Boston Red Sox, under three different managers. After the season, Bucky Harris, an experienced and well-traveled skipper, was brought in to lead the team in 1947. Harris had previously managed in Washington, Detroit, Boston, and Philadelphia, but after his success with the Senators in his first two seasons, he had a sub-.500 record as skipper. Despite the losing record, Harris was well-respected among his peers and his players, with a reputation as a smart and savvy manager. Harris first earned fame as the “boy manager” of the 1924 Washington Senators. Washington had failed to field a competitive team through a succession of managers until owner Clark Griffith boldly named the twenty-seven-year-old second baseman with five years of Major League playing experience, but none as a manager, to lead the team. The Senators won the pennant and the World Series in his first year and repeated as pennant winner the next year.

He "Gripped a bat so tight that when you shook hands with him, you shook hands with a callus.”1 The quote epitomizes Pete Fox, who was remembered as a “winning ballplayer, diligent and deadly serious…”2 Fox rose from the sandlots of Evansville, Indiana, to play 13 seasons in the big leagues. A lifetime .298 hitter, he was a popular player who performed in the shadow of several Hall of Famers and perhaps did not receive the notoriety to match his accomplishments. Fox hit .300 or better in five seasons, batted .327 in three World Series (and led the Tigers in the 1935 Series with a .385 average). As of 2013 he still held the record for the most doubles in a single Series (6, in the 1935 Series), was an All-Star in 1944, and led the league in fielding average five times as a right fielder.

Marv Owen played nine years in the majors, mostly with the Detroit Tigers during the time of Hank Greenberg and Charlie Gehringer, with whom he played in the infield. He was in the 1934 World Series, which the Tigers lost, and the 1935 World Series, which the Tigers won. His best year with the bat was with the 1934 Tigers, when he hit .317, got 59 walks, and had 98 RBI. He played exclusively third base in 1933-35 and 1937-39, but in other years occasionally played elsewhere in the infield. He had several years in the minors before coming up for good with the Tigers (he played much of 1931 with them but was back in the minors in 1932). After his major league days he had six years with the Portland Beavers, through age 40, and then one year with the San Jose Red Sox. After managing in the minors for over 10 years, Marv Owen would scout for the Detroit Tigers into the early 1970s. At age 24, he was head coach at Santa Clara University in 1930.

Al Simmons (Aloysius Harry Szymanski) was a premier hitter and left fielder for Connie Mack’s formidable Philadelphia Athletics from 1924 to 1932 and subsequently for other major-league clubs through 1944. Simmons was born in Milwaukee on May 22, 1902, the son of Polish immigrants. He played high-school baseball before briefly attending Stevens Point Teachers College as a football player and later playing semipro baseball in Juneau, Wisconsin. The hometown Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association signed the hard-hitting 6-foot, 200-pounder in 1922 and sent him to Aberdeen, South Dakota, of the Class D Dakota League, where he hit .365 in 99 games. He also played in 19 games for Milwaukee that season, getting 11 hits in 50 at-bats (.220). Moved up the following year to Shreveport in the Texas League, he duplicated his performance, hitting .360 in a full season before playing out the rest of the season with the Brewers, where he sparkled, hitting .398 in 24 games. Simmons’ powerful hitting was achieved despite his unusual batting stance. A right-handed hitter and thrower, Simmons stood at the plate with his left (front) foot pointed toward third base, “in the bucket” in baseball parlance. Accordingly, he gained the nickname Bucketfoot Al, which he resented. Theoretically, he should have had difficulty in hitting outside pitches solidly. But Simmons overcame this apparent weakness by using an unusually long bat and moving his left foot closer to home plate with the approach of an outside pitch. As Simmons explained, “I’ve studied movies of myself batting. Although my left foot stabbed out toward third base, the rest of me, from the belt up, especially my wrists, arms, and shoulders, was swinging in a proper line over the plate.”

If you were to build a Mount Rushmore of baseball managers, John McGraw would have to be part of any foursome. McGraw managed the New York Giants from 1902 to 1932, winning ten National League pennants and three World Championships. Along the way, he influenced the game of baseball like no one before or since. At 5-foot, 7-inches, 155 pounds, McGraw was famously known as “Little Napoleon,” and the name fit like one of his trademark suits. McGraw was given to violent outbursts toward his players, the opposition, and, of course, umpires. He was not, however, all brimstone and no brains. On the contrary, McGraw brought a cerebral quality to managing, using his mind as much as his mouth. When it comes to the front office, Connie Mack is at the very front. Although his numbers are a bit deceiving, Cornelius McGillicuddy is considered the greatest manager of all time. His overall won-lost record is actually below .500, but keep in mind that Mack was forced to constantly tweak his teams and replenish his roster because of the organization’s financial turmoil. The fact remains that Connie Mack managed five World Series Champions, nine pennant winners, and more games than anyone in baseball history. Some of his Athletics teams were dynasties, and some were plain awful.

Chicago White Sox: Luke Appling, Al Simmons, Ted Lyons, Jimmy Dykes

Ervin “Pete” Fox (March 8, 1909 - July 5, 1966) played 13 seasons in right field for the Detroit Tigers (1933-1940) and the Boston Red Sox (1941-1945). Fox was an excellent outfielder with a solid arm, speed and range. He and his Tigers teammates played back-to-back World Series in 1934 and 1935 capturing the 1935 title in six games over the Chicago Cubs. During the 1935 World Series, Pete Fox led all hitters with 10 hits and an exceptional .385 batting average. Pete had a knack for hitting doubles, averaging 26 per season as well as averaging .302 at the plate with 140 hits, 13 stolen bases and 58 RBI. Fox was named to the 1944 American League All-Star team and earned consideration three times for the AL MVP awards. Pete Fox finished his career 1,678 hits including 314 doubles, scored 895 runs, drove in 694 runs while batting .298 over the course of his 13-year career.

This is one of Bill Dickey's most desirable cards, residing in the tough high-number series of the beautiful Diamond Stars issue. As a player, Dickey was one of the best catchersto ever play the game. He also was one of the fiercest. After a collision at the plate in 1932, Dickey broke the jaw of Carl Reynolds with one punch. Dickey hit .313 with 202 home runs and 1,209 RBI in his career, a career that included a four-year streak where he reached at least 20 homers and 100 RBI (1936-1939). In 1936, Dickey hit .362, which remains the highest single-season batting average for a catcher (tied with Mike Piazza - 1997). Dickey won seven World Series championships as a player with the New York Yankees and was a master at handling pitchers. In fact, Dickey was brought back to the Yankees in 1949to mentor another Hall of Fame catcher, Yogi Berra. This eight-time All-Star was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1954. This card, along with 11 others in the high-number series, was not originally issued with the set. The company decided to add the 12 cards later to complete it since they promised the public 108 total cards. Each card in the series, including this Dickey card, is very scarce compared to the rest of the cards. Henry Benjamin “Hank” Greenberg (January 1, 1911 - September 4, 1986) was one of the most feared right-handed hitters in the history of Major League Baseball, knocking out 331 career home runs in a mere 1,394 career games, an average of one home run for every 15.7 at-bats.

John Charles Babich (May 14, 1913 - January 19, 2001) struggled for three years on the mound in the National League, but then went 14-13 after joining the American League’s Philadelphia Athletics, which included five wins against the reigning World Champion New York Yankees. Though his professional career began in 1931, it was after his 20-15 season with the Mission Reds of the Pacific Coast League that caught the eye of the Brooklyn Dodgers who promptly purchased his rights in 1934. Babich pitched three seasons in the National League with the Dodgers (1934-1935) and the Boston Bees (1936) posting a 14-25 record in 112 games and 86 starts. John returned to the minors for three seasons and then the Athletics grabbed him from the New York Yankees in the Rule 5 Draft in 1939. Babich’s resurgent 1940 season not only included his 14-13 record, but also career-high in strikeouts (94), complete games (16) and starts (30) while posting a career-low 3.73 ERA. Though he once again returned to the minors to complete his career, John Babich went 30-45 with 231 strikeouts, 34 complete games, three shutouts and a 4.93 ERA in 86 starts and 112 James Quinter Bucher (March 11, 1911 – October 21, 2004) was an infielder/outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1934–1937), St. Louis Cardinals (1938) and Boston Red Sox (1944–1945). A native of Manassas, Virginia, Bucher batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He debuted on April 18, 1934 and played his final game on September 29, 1945.[1] Bucher was a defensively versatile player with decent abilities at third base, second, and any of the three outfield positions. His most productive season came with the 1935 Dodgers, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.302), home runs (7), RBI (58), runs (72), hits (143), doubles (22), and games played (123). In 1937, he was sent to the Cardinals along with Johnny Cooney in the same trade that brought Leo Durocher to Brooklyn. He ended his majors career with the Boston Red Sox. In a seven-season career, Bucher was a .265 hitter with 17 home runs and 193 RBI in 554 games. Bucher died in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, at age 93.

The 1933 season was in only its third week when the Washington Senators made a stop in New York to face the world champion Yankees in a two-game series, on April 28 and 29. For the Senators, it was an important series, as they were headed west on an 11-game trip in early May. They finished off the Yankees in the first game, 4-3 in ten innings. The next day Washington had a 6-2 lead behind starter Monte Weaver. Weaver, who had surrendered only four hits in the first eight innings, gave up three consecutive hits to start the ninth; Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Dixie Walker all singled to cut the deficit to 6-3. With Gehrig at second base and Walker on first, the crowd of more than 35,000 cheered wildly when second baseman Tony Lazzeri stepped to the plate. “Poosh ‘Em Up” crushed an offering by Weaver to deep right-center field. Goose Goslin gave chase, but the liner averted his grasp. Gehrig had not strayed far from second base, to make sure Goslin did not catch the smash. But Walker was running all the way and when Gehrig did take off, Walker was right behind him. Goslin retrieved the ball and fired it in to the relay man, shortstop and manager Joe Cronin. Cronin wheeled and threw home to catcher Luke Sewell. Gehrig was surprised the ball beat him to the plate, and did not slide. Instead, he seemed to break his stride just a bit, as Sewell tagged him with the ball clutched in his right hand. Gehrig hit Sewell hard, spinning him completely around. Recovering, Luke dived toward the third base line to tag the oncoming Walker, who had slid to the inside of the plate. Walker was out, and the unorthodox double play was completed. The play turned the Bronx fans’ cheers into groans. Gehrig and Walker were both in disbelief. Weaver was also a bit stunned. “It’s two outs, Monte,” the veteran catcher made clear to Weaver. “Oh, do we have two outs?” replied the puzzled pitcher. “It was a swell job by Goslin and Cronin,” said Sewell. “I didn’t have to move for the ball. It was easy. Cronin can sure pitch the ball.” Indeed it was only a two-game sweep, but the Senators served notice that they were a viable contender in the league. And the acquisition of the veteran catcher from Cleveland was one reason why Cronin felt that way; he had proclaimed that Sewell was the “best receiver in the business” when the deal was made during the offseason. And indeed, the veteran of 12 major-league seasons justified Cronin’s confidence, giving a sterling performance behind the plate and helping rookie manager Cronin handle his pitching staff as the Senators won the American League pennant.

“Pinkey Whitney is the greatest third baseman in baseball,” said Grover Cleveland Alexander in 1930. During a 12-year career, Whitney played for two National League doormats, the Philadelphia Phillies and the Boston Braves. “It’s a shame he couldn’t have gotten with a winning club,” Alexander said. “That boy is a wonderful fielder and one of the most dangerous hitters in the game.”1 In eight of his 12 seasons, Whitney ranked either first or second in fielding percentage among NL third basemen. In his first five seasons, he batted .312 and averaged 107 RBIs per season. Learning to play third base is like learning to dance, said Whitney – “you stumble around for a while and then all of a sudden it comes to you!”2

Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 - August 25, 1984) was one of the most dominant pitchers of the 1920 for the New York Yankees posting an astonishing 157-98 from 1921-1930. Hoyt pitched 21 seasons in the major leagues primarily with the Yankees (1921-1930) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (1933-1937) compiling a record of 237-182 with 1,206 strikeouts and a career 3.59. Nicknamed the Merry Mortician due to his off-season position as an undertaker, Hoyt was a key element in the 1920s Yankee dynasty as they captured 6 American League pennants and three World Series titles (1923, 1927, 1928). He added another AL pennant with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1931. Waite Hoyt retired in 1938 and began a career in broadcasting with the Brooklyn Dodgers, ending up as play-by-play announcer for the Cincinnati Reds for 24 years until 1965. After many years in Alcoholics Anonymous, Hoyt reminisced that he could have topped the 300-win mark had it not been for his excessive drinking. The Veterans Committee elected Waite Charles Hoyt to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.

Winner of 158 major-league games, Willis Hudlin was a mainstay of the Cleveland Indians’ pitching staff in the 1920s and 1930s. His best pitches were his fastball and sinker. He was later a team owner, manager, coach and scout, in a professional baseball career that lasted nearly 50 years.

Charles Walter “Chuck” Dressen (September 20, 1894 - August 10, 1966) had a relatively uneventful eight-year career playing third base for the Cincinnati Reds (1925-1931) and the New York Giants (1933), but is better known for his 16-year career as a Major League manager for five different clubs. Dressen played quarterback with the Decatur Staleys, which became the Chicago Bears, before playing baseball exclusively beginning in 1925. In eight seasons at third base, Chuck batted .272 with 603 hits and 221 RBI in 646 games before hanging them up for a managerial position. As a member of the 1933 World Series champion Giants team, Dressen was not utilized during the series, but made a key call when he advised player/manager Bill Terry how to pitch to a former Southern League adversary, Cliff Bolton. It became apparent Dressen had a knack for managing as Bolton hit into a double play and the Giants went on to win the game and the series. In 1934, Dressen was summoned to become the manager for the Cincinnati Reds for four seasons (1934-1937). Dressen managed for Cincinnati, the Brooklyn Dodgers (1951-1953), the Washington Senators (1955-1957), the Milwaukee Braves (1960-1961) and the Detroit Tigers (1963-1964, 1965-1966). Chuck’s greatest success came while leading the Dodgers as he took them to back-to-back National League pennants in 1952 and 1953 before falling to their cross-town nemesis New York Yankees in each World Series. Dressen never managed to reach the Promised Land over his 16 years as a Major Leagues manager, but compiled a respectable 1,008-973 record in 1,990 games and won two pennants. He helped return the Detroit Tigers to greatness, rebuilding the team that would eventually win the 1968 World Series, following Dressen’s death in 1966. The wily tactician lived by the mantra, “Just hold them, boys, until I think of something.”

hilip Joseph Cavarretta (July 19, 1916 - December 18, 2010) was a Chicago native, graduate of Lane Tech High School, famed alma mater of legendary athletes Johnny Weissmuller and Fritz Pollard, and spent the majority of his career playing first base for the Chicago Cubs. Phil signed with the Cubs as a high schooler and hit for the cycle in his first professional game with the Peoria Tractors. In 1935, Cavarretta permanently replaced Charlie Grimm at first base and helped lead Chicago to the best record in baseball and the World Series against the eventual champion Detroit Tigers. Phil was a legitimate hitter with limited power and led the National League in hits in 1944 (197). In 1945, he led the NL in batting average (.355) and on-base percentage (.449) en route to the 1945 National League Most Valuable Player Award. The three-time NL All-Star helped lead the Cubs to three National League pennants (1935, 1938, 1945). After playing 20 years on the North Side in a Chicago Cubs uniform (1934-1953), Cavarretta signed with the South Side Chicago White Sox to finish his career (1954-1955). Phil Cavarretta finished his career with a .293 career batting average, 1,977 hits including 347 doubles and 99 triples, 990 runs scored and 920 RBI while posting a .989 fielding percentage over 22 years. From 1951 to 1953, Phil served as player/manager for the Cubs compiling a 169-213 record in 384 games.

Charles Dillon “Casey” Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975) enjoyed 54 years in baseball beginning as a right fielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers and retiring as one of the most accomplished managers in baseball history with the New York Mets. Though a respectable player during his 14-year playing career, batting .284 with 1,219 hits and 535 RBI, Stengel earned his Hall of Fame recognition at the helm of some of the greatest teams in history. Most notably, Stengel managed the 1950s New York Yankees (1949-1960) dynasty to 10 American League pennants and seven World Series championships including five consecutive (1949-1953). Casey Stengel amassed a record of 1,926-1,867 for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1934-1936), the Boston Bees (1938-1942) and Braves (1943), the New York Yankees (1949-1960) and the New York Mets (1962-1965). Stengel was an exacting and expert tactician, but kept a charming air about him with his sense of humor that put players, media and executives at ease. The Veterans Committee elected Charles Dillon “Casey” Stengel to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966.

e was known as “The Tall Tactician” and was baseball’s grand old gentleman for more than a generation. Statuesque, stately, and slim, he clutched a rolled-up scorecard as he sat or stood ramrod straight in the dugout, attired in a business suit rather than a uniform, a derby or bowler in place of a baseball cap. He carried himself with quiet dignity, and commanded the respect of friend and foe. Widely addressed by players and other officials as Mr. Mack, he and the Philadelphia Athletics were so closely linked for 50 years the team was often dubbed "the Mackmen." Connie Mack’s Hall of Fame career spanned 65 major-league seasons as a player, manager, team executive, and owner. He posted 3,731 wins, a mark that exceeds any other manager’s total by more than 1,000 victories. He guided the Athletics to nine American League championships and won five World Series titles in eight appearances. He was the first manager to win three World Series titles, and the first to win consecutive titles two times. The valleys were as low as the peaks were high - he also endured a major-league record 3,948 losses, and his team finished last in its league 17 times. He built his dynasties with rising young players, won championships with the stars he developed, and then sold off those stars when he could no longer afford them. A journeyman catcher who offered more in the way of innovation and creativity than ability during an 11-year major-league playing career, Mack served as player-manager for the National League’s Pittsburgh (the city was actually known as “Pittsburg” from 1890 to 1911) Pirates for three seasons during the rollicking 1890’s, and then for four seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers of the Western League, which became the American League in 1900. In 1901, when the circuit declared it was a major league and began to invade Eastern cities, A.L. President Ban Johnson asked Mack to establish the Philadelphia Athletics. Mack managed the team through 1950, and was a team owner for the franchise’s entire 54-year existence. In the early years of the Athletics, Mack skippered some of the Deadball Era’s best teams, winning six A.L. pennants and three World Series in the league's first 14 years, primarily with players he discovered on school grounds and sandlots and developed into stars. Faced with financial difficulties because of the onset of World War I and competition for players from the fledgling Federal League, he dismantled his dynasty and endured a decade of miserable finishes. As he advanced into his sixties, many sportswriters and fans suggested the game had passed him by. But he adjusted to the times, opened his checkbook to purchase rising stars from minor-league teams, and built a second dynasty by the end of the Roaring Twenties.

Danny Taylor, Tris Speaker & Ki Ki Cuyler

harles Leo “Gabby” Hartnett (December 20, 1900 - December 20, 1972) was the catcher for the Chicago Cubs for 19 seasons from 1922-1940 and served and served as player/manager for his final therein a Cubs uniform. Called Gabby, due to his lack of communication or quiet nature, Hartnett made noise with his fielding ability, leading the NL in assists and fielding percentage six times, and his bat, hitting for a career .297 with 1,912 hits, 236 home runs and 1,179 RBI. Hartnett is most notably remembered offensively hitting a home run in near-darkness to help the Cubs win their fourth pennant, known as the “Homer in the Gloamin’”. Gabby Hartnett won four National League pennants with the Cubs, was a six-time selection to the All-Star game and won the 1935 national League Most Valuable Player award. Charles Leo “Gabby” Hartnett was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Lonnie Warneke (March 28, 1909 - June 23, 1976) is the only player in Major League history to play and umpire in both a World Series and an All-Star game. Warneke came up with the Chicago Cubs in 1930 at the age of 21. In 1932, his second full season, The Sporting News called Lon the outstanding National League pitcher of the year after he led the league in wins posting a 22-6 record, led in winning percentage (78.6%), ERA (2.37) and shutouts (4). He finished second in Most Valuable Player award voting, his first recognition of seven. He was named to his first of five All-Star Game appearances the following season. Warneke pitched 15 seasons for the Chicago Cubs (1930-1936, 1942-1943, 1945) and the St. Louis Cardinals (1937-1942). In 1941, he threw a no-hitter for the St. Louis Cardinals against the Cincinnati Reds. Lon was a member of two National League pennant-winning teams (1932, 1935) and was 2-1 in World Series games, having played in five and completed two. Warneke led the league once in wins, winning percentage, ERA, complete games a wild pitches and twice topped all of the NL pitchers with shutouts. Lon Warneke finished his career with a 192-121 record adding 1,140 strikeouts and a 3.18 career ERA in 2,782.1 innings pitched.

Van Mungo was the only quality pitcher on some very bad Dodgers teams in the 1930s. In his first full season with Brooklyn he went 13-11 in 1932 as the Dodgers finished third in the league with an 81-73 record for new manager Max Carey. During each of the next six seasons, the Dodgers lost more games than they won. Before each season Mungo would promise to anyone and everyone that he would win 20 games. And each season, the promise of spring met up with the reality of summer, and Mungo never won more than 18 games.

Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 - November 21, 1988), along with Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox pitcher Lefty Grove, were in a league of their in the 1930s as Hubbell strung together five consecutive 20-win seasons, leading the National League three times while Grove led the American League four times in victories.

William Crutcher “Big Bill” Lee (October 21, 1909 - June 15, 1977) was part of a trade from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs that was originally intended to be a ruse by Cards GM Branch Rickey as he offered Lee and another hurler to Cubs GM Bill Veeck, Sr. With the Cubs rotation heavily laden with right handed pitchers and the Redbirds offering aright-hander and a left-hander, Rickey expected Veeck to choose lefty Clarence Heise, but that was not the case as Lee joined the Cubs and pitched ten seasons for the Northsiders. Heise appeared in one game and vanished and on this rare occasion Rickey wiped egg from his face. Bill Lee joined the Cardinals organization in 1932 and went 40-18 in his first two seasons with the Columbus Red Birds before the trade to Chicago. Lee was immediately inserted into the Cubs starting rotation and in 1935 he led the National League in winning percentage *(.769) after going 20-6 as Chicago won the National League pennant. In 1938, he was diabolical as he led the NL in wins with a 22-9 record and also led in winning percentage (.710), ERA (2.66), starts (37) and shutouts (9) while earning his first of two straight All-Star appearances. The durable Big Bill led the NL three times in starts during his tenure with the Cubs (1934-1943) and pitched them to two pennants, but was unable to lead them over the hump and win a World Series. Lee was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies (1943-1945) and the pitched for the Boston Braves (1945-1946) before retuning to Chicago for one final year (1947). Following his stretch with the Cubs to start his career, Bill had difficulties seeing the signs and attempted to use eyeglasses to improve his poor vision. However, they were of little help and soon after he retired in 1947, he underwent surgery to repair detached retinas. He would ultimately go blind. Bill Lee did, however, enjoy a 14-year career in the Major Leagues, posting a record of 169-157 with 998 strikeouts, 182 complete games, 29 shutouts and a 3.54 ERA in 462 contests.

William Jennings Herman (July 7, 1909 - September 5, 1992) was an incredibly talented second baseman during the 1930s and ‘40s, setting numerous records that stand today. Because of his durability and everyday presence on the field, Herman led the National League in many fielding statistic such as putouts, assists, errors and fielding percentage. However, Herman was no slouch at the plate, batting over the .300-mark eight times and was very adept at the hit-and-run. Herman played primarily for the Chicago Cubs (1931-1941) but also spent time with National League team like Brooklyn, Boston and Pittsburgh and earned ten All-Star selections in 15 seasons. Billy Herman retired with a .304 career batting average with 2.345 hits, 1,163 runs, and 839 RBI. In 1936, Billy Herman had an impressive five hits on Opening Day and currently shares that record. The Veterans Committee elected William Jennings Herman to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

Joseph Frank Demaree (June 10, 1910 - August 30, 1958) helped his teams (Cubs, Cardinals, Browns) win five pennants, four National League and one American League. Demaree played outfield for the Chicago Cubs (1932-1933, 1935-1938), the New York Giants (1939-1941), the Boston Braves (1941-1942), the St. Louis Cardinals (1943) and the St. Louis Browns (1944). Not only did he sport a .978 career fielding percentage, but Frank also had five seasons batting over .300 in the National League. In 1936, he enjoyed his greatest season appearing in 154 games batting .350 with 212 hits, 93 runs, 96 RBI and hit .324 with 199 hits, 104 runs and 115 RBI in the following campaign. Frank was named to the 1936 and 1937 All-Star Games. Frank Demaree finished his career after the 1944 season with 1,241 hits, 578 runs, 591 RBI and a .299 career batting average.

He is a permanent part of baseball lore. He played for the Chicago Cubs in the 1945 World Series, their last appearance in the Fall Classic. He stood with his back against the left-field wall as Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard ’round the world” flew over his head and out of the Polo Grounds to give the Giants a victory over his Dodgers and clinch the 1951 National League pennant. He was the starting rightfielder for his home-state Milwaukee Braves in 1953 and 1954. He lost his starting job in 1955 to a young outfielder, Hank Aaron. He played in four World Series for three different teams in his 17-year career. His name was Andy Pafko.

Louis Boudreau (July 17, 1917 - August 10, 2001) was an exceptional all-around fielding shortstop with a keen eye and ability at the plate. Handsome Lou played 15 seasons with the Cleveland Indians (1938-1950) and the Boston Red Sox (1951-1952). Boudreau was selected to eight All-Star games, was the 1944 American League batting champion and was award the 1948 American League Most Valuable Player award. Lou Boudreau finished his career with a .295 batting average with 1,779 hits and 789 RBI. Lou Boudreau was made player/manager of the Indians in 1942 and held that position until he signed with the Red Sox in 1951. Boudreau managed the Indians to the 1948 World Series title and compiled a 728-649 record with the Indians, Red Sox, Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs in 16 years at the helm. Louis Boudreau was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1970.

Simmons’ powerful hitting was achieved despite his unusual batting stance. A right-handed hitter and thrower, Simmons stood at the plate with his left (front) foot pointed toward third base, “in the bucket” in baseball parlance. Accordingly, he gained the nickname Bucketfoot Al, which he resented. Theoretically, he should have had difficulty in hitting outside pitches solidly. But Simmons overcame this apparent weakness by using an unusually long bat and moving his left foot closer to home plate with the approach of an outside pitch. As Simmons explained, “I’ve studied movies of myself batting. Although my left foot stabbed out toward third base, the rest of me, from the belt up, especially my wrists, arms, and shoulders, was swinging in a proper line over the plate.”

Charles Herbert “Red” Ruffing (May 3, 1905-February 17, 1986) had rocky pitching career with the Boston Red Sox (1924-1930) posting a 39-96 record before being traded to the New York Yankees (1930-1942, 1945-1946) becoming one of the elite pitchers in the American League. Bolstered by the run support given by Ruth, Gehrig, Lazzeri and Dickey, Red enjoyed 15 seasons with the Bronx Bombers compiling a record of 231-124 collecting 1,526 strikeouts and porting a 3.47 ERA. (Career totals: 273-225, 1,987 strikeouts, 3.80 ERA in 624 games.) Red Ruffing if the last pitcher in baseball to throw a complete game shutout and hit a home run in a 1-0 victory when he accomplished the feat against the Washington Senators in 1932. Red Ruffing was a six-time All-Star game selection and six-time World Series champion. Charles Herbert “Red” Ruffing was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1967.

William Frederick “Billy” Jurges (May 9, 1908 - March 3, 1997) played the left side of the infield at short and third for 17 seasons with the Chicago Cubs (1931-1938, 1946-1947) and the New York Giants (1939-1945). Billy survived being shot by a distraught ex-girlfriend in 1932 to enjoy a successful career in the big leagues for 15 more years. He was a three-time All-Star selection and made three World Series appearances with the Chicago Cubs, all losing efforts. Billy Jurges finished his career after the 1947 season with 1,613 hits, 721 runs, 656 RBI and a .258 career batting average.

“Jiquí” Moreno was not big (5’8” and 165 pounds) -- but he threw hard. How hard is jiquí wood? In Cuba, Moreno’s native land, linemen could not sink their spurs into telephone poles made from this tree -- they had to use ladders. Brick stair steps wore down, yet their jiquí binding was simply polished. That’s how tough this pitcher was in his heyday at home. “The Cuban Bob Feller” had a spectacular record in high-level amateur ball in the early 1940s. After turning pro, the righty remained a major year-round drawing card in Havana. He was one of many Cubans whom Joe Cambria signed for the Washington Senators. Journalist Fausto Miranda -- older brother of Willy Miranda, a friend and teammate in Washington -- called him “The Meteor of Güines.”

Robert Brown “Bobby” Thomson (October 25, 1923 - August 16, 2010) not only hit one of the most memorable and dramatic home runs in the history of Major League Baseball, but he hit 20 or more home runs in eight of his 15 seasons in the big leagues. Bobby signed with the New York Giants right out of high school, but did not join the club until he finished serving in the United States Air Force during World War II. Thomson enjoyed his best season in 1949 when he hit .309 with 198 hits including 27 home runs and 109 RBI. Always a power threat, Bobby belted 32 home runs in 1951, helping the Giants erase a 13-1/2 game deficit to force a one game playoff with the Brooklyn Dodgers for the National League pennant. With the Giants trailing the Dodgers 4-2 in the bottom of the ninth inning, a man on second and third, Thomson took Ralph Branca’s 0-1 pitch over the left field wall as Giants’ announcer, Russ Hodges, excitedly proclaimed “The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!” Dubbed “the Shot Heard Round the World”, Bobby Thomson’s clutch home run solidified both his and Ralph Branca’s place in history. The Giants then lost the World Series to the New York Yankees in six games. The three-times All-Star played outfield and third for 15 seasons with the Giants (1946-1953, 1957), the Milwaukee Braves (1954-1957), the Chicago Cubs (1958-1959), the Boston Red Sox (1960) and the Baltimore Orioles (1960). Bobby Thomson finished his career with a .270 career batting average with 1,705 hits including 267 doubles and 264 home runs, scored 903 runs and drove in 1,026 runs. He also posted a .973 career fielding percentage.

Alfonso Carrasquel Colon, better known as Chico Carrasquel (January 23, 1926 - May 26, 2005) was a superb shortstop for four different teams during his 10-year Major League Baseball career, including the Chicago White Sox (1950–1955), Cleveland Indians (1956–1958), Kansas City Athletics (1958), and Baltimore Orioles (1959). He was the first Venezuelan-born shortstop (paving the way for such figures as Luis Aparicio and Ozzie Guillen), and the first Latin American player in baseball history to start an All-Star Game. Chico began his career in 1946, playing professional baseball in Venezuela for the Cerveceria Caracas, and hitting the first home run in Venezuelan Professional Baseball history. The Brooklyn Dodgers signed Chico as a free agent in 1949 but soon sold his contract to the White Sox, where he replaced future Hall of Famer Luke Appling at short and paired with Nellie Foxx at second to become one of the game’s best double play combinations. As a rookie, Carrasquel hit for career-high .282 in 141 games and established a 24-game hitting streak. The next season, he became the first Latin American player to start an All-Star Game in what would be his first of four appearances (1951, 1953-1955), and also set an MLB record by handling 297 consecutive chances in 53 games without committing an error. Arguably, his best season came in 1954, as Chico posted career-highs in home runs (12), RBIs (62), hits (158), runs (106), extra base hits (43), and (85); he also led all American League shortstops in double plays and fielding percentage. A strained relationship with Sox manager Marty Marion prompted the team to trade Carrasquel to Cleveland, where he played 2-1/2 seasons before being sent to Kansas City and finally to Baltimore (in exchange for Dick Williams), where Chico finished his professional career. Always a disciplined hitter, Chico had 1,199 hits, 55 home runs, and 474 RBI in 1,325 games played. After leaving the game, he played and managed ball clubs in Venezuela, which coupled with his status as a big league ballplayer, elevated him to national hero status in his native land.

Curtis Thomas Simmons (May 19, 1929-) struck out 11 Philadelphia Phillies in 1947 as a rising high school star pitching in a game pitting a Pennsylvania high school all-star team against the Major League club. Simmons was later signed with Philadelphia and began his career as a member of the 1950 Phillies Whiz Kids. Simmons went 17-8 despite missing a month due to military training, and eventually missed the World Series as his unit was activated. Curt had continued success in Philadelphia winning 10 or more game in six seasons from 1950-1957. In 1952, he led the National League in shutouts earning his first of three All-Star Game appearances. Curt pitched 20 seasons in the Majors with the Phillies (1947-1950, 1952-1960), the St. Louis Cardinals (1960-1966), the Chicago Cubs (1966-1967) and the California Angels (1967). In 1964, Simmons was a member of the World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals. Curt Simmons finished his career in 1967 with a 193-183 record over 20 seasons with 1,697 strikeouts, 163 complete games and 36 shutouts while posting a 3.54 ERA.

Donald Newcombe (June 14, 1926 - February 19, 2019) was the only pitcher in Major League history to win the Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards, until Detroit Tigers’ Justin Verlander accomplished the feat in 2011. Newcombe earned The Sporting News and Baseball Writers Rookie of the Year Award in 1949 as he helped Brooklyn capture the National League pennant. During the pennant run, Newk had a stretch of 32 straight scoreless innings and finished his season with a 17-8 record with 149 strikeouts and a league leading five shutouts. Don Newcombe suffered a handful of season ended foibles and failures throughout his career though he remained a successful pitcher for 10 seasons. For instance, Newcombe was lifted in the ninth inning of the 1951 playoff game against the New York Giants, with two men on, in favor of Ralph Branca, who in turn gave up Bobby Thomson’s 3-run homers and “shot heard ‘round the world.” Don always bounced back and in 1955 he went 20-5 as he led the Dodgers to the Promised Land over the cross-town rival New York Yankees. In 1956, Newcombe produced a superb year going 27-2 with five shutouts and 139 strikeouts earning both the National League’s Most Valuable Player award and Major League Baseball’s inaugural Cy Young Award. He was also named The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year in 1956. Newk pitched ten years in the bigs with Brooklyn/Los Angeles (1949-1951, 1954-1957/1958), the Cincinnati Reds (1958-1960) and the Cleveland Indians (160) and appeared in four MLB All-Star Games. Don Newcombe finished his career in 1960 having amassed a 149-90 record with 136 complete games, 1,129 strikeouts and 24 shutouts.

Donald Newcombe (June 14, 1926 - February 19, 2019) was the only pitcher in Major League history to win the Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards, until Detroit Tigers’ Justin Verlander accomplished the feat in 2011. Newcombe earned The Sporting News and Baseball Writers Rookie of the Year Award in 1949 as he helped Brooklyn capture the National League pennant. During the pennant run, Newk had a stretch of 32 straight scoreless innings and finished his season with a 17-8 record with 149 strikeouts and a league leading five shutouts. Don Newcombe suffered a handful of season ended foibles and failures throughout his career though he remained a successful pitcher for 10 seasons. For instance, Newcombe was lifted in the ninth inning of the 1951 playoff game against the New York Giants, with two men on, in favor of Ralph Branca, who in turn gave up Bobby Thomson’s 3-run homers and “shot heard ‘round the world.” Don always bounced back and in 1955 he went 20-5 as he led the Dodgers to the Promised Land over the cross-town rival New York Yankees. In 1956, Newcombe produced a superb year going 27-2 with five shutouts and 139 strikeouts earning both the National League’s Most Valuable Player award and Major League Baseball’s inaugural Cy Young Award. He was also named The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year in 1956. Newk pitched ten years in the bigs with Brooklyn/Los Angeles (1949-1951, 1954-1957/1958), the Cincinnati Reds (1958-1960) and the Cleveland Indians (160) and appeared in four MLB All-Star Games. Don Newcombe finished his career in 1960 having amassed a 149-90 record with 136 complete games, 1,129 strikeouts and 24 shutouts.

Edwin Donald “Duke” Snider (September 19, 1926 - February 27, 2011) was the hard-hitting centerfielder of the highly power-laden Brooklyn Dodgers of the 1940s and ‘50s. Snider was among three Hall of Fame centerfielders of the era alongside New York Giant, Willie Mays, and New York Yankee, Mickey Mantle. Known as “The Duke of Flatbush,” Snider outgunned the rest of the league during the 1950s, hitting more home runs than any other player with 326. Duke was an eight-time All-Star selection, was a member of six National League pennant winners and helped lead the Dodger to two World Series championships (1955 and 1959). Snider player primarily for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers (1947-1962) with one-year stints with the Mets (1963) and the San Francisco Giants (1964) before retiring at the end of the 1964 season. Duke Snider was the last player to hit a home run in historic Ebbet’s Field in 1957 prior to the franchise moving to Los Angeles. Duke Snider retired with 2,116 hits, 1,259 runs, 1,333 RBI 407, home runs and a .295 career batting average. Edwin Donald “Duke” Snider was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980.

Most great players have something similar during their careers: a dominant year, a key series in which they made their name — or a signature play. Hall of Famer Enos Slaughter’s even had a nickname. His “Mad Dash” in Game Seven of the 1946 World Series took place on the brightest of stages. It’s certainly one of the reasons why he was enshrined in Cooperstown in 1985. Yet there was much more. Over a 19-year big-league career, he posted a .300 batting average, with 2,383 hits. Had he not lost three prime years to World War II, he could have approached 3,000. The aggressive, constantly hustling outfielder was selected to play in ten All Star Games, eight straight with the St. Louis Cardinals from 1946 to 1953. “One of the greatest,” remarked Casey Stengel, later his manager with the New York Yankees. “He will do anything to beat you.”

Ernest "Ernie" Banks (January 31, 1931 - January 23, 2015) remains, without a doubt, the most beloved Chicago Cubs player in franchise history and was voted the "Greatest Cub Ever" in a 1969 Chicago Tribune fan poll. Not only was he one of the best Cub the team had ever seen, but he is considered one of the greatest Major League Baseball players in history. As a boy, Ernie had little interest in baseball but rather affection for football, basketball and track instead. With his father moonlighting as a semi-pro baseball player, he often bribed the young Banks with nickels and dimes to play catch to nudge him toward his sport of choice. Ernie’s Booker T, Washington High School lacked a baseball team so he played football and basketball while also playing fast pitch softball outside of high school and then the Amarillo Colts, a semiprofessional baseball team. He began playing with the Negro Leagues Kansas City Monarchs before being drafted into the United States Army serving two years, but playing part time with the Harlem Globetrotters during his service. Upon his discharge in 1953, Ernie returned to the Kansas City Monarchs for a brief stint before the Chicago Cubs came calling. He is one of only a handful of Negro League player to enter the big leagues without starting out in the minors and he, in fact, never played a single minor league game in his career. In 1954, he put together an exceptional season with 19 home runs, 79 RBI and a .275 batting average but was edged out of the National League Rookie of the Year voting by St. Louis Cardinals Wally Moon.

Frank Conrad Baumholtz (October 7, 1918 – December 14, 1997) Where do we start when it comes to Frank Baumholtz? Yes, he had a .290 lifetime batting average in the majors and was quite an outfielder. Good with the bat, Baumholtz batted .325 in 1952 and .306 in 1953 for the Cubs. We are not even sure that baseball was his best sport. Baumholtz was also a first-team All-American basketball player who led the Ohio University Bobcats to the National Invitation Tournament final in 1941, and he played professional basketball averaging 14 points per game. Above and beyond his athletic endeavors, he served four years in the US Navy. Lieutenant Baumholtz saw extensive action in World War II as his ship was involved in the final battles in the Pacific, off Iwo Jima and Okinawa. A star on the baseball diamond, basketball court, and the battlefield, Baumholtz passed away in 1997 at the age of 79.

John August Antonelli (April 30, 1930-February 28, 2020) led the National League in winning percentage (.730), ERA (2.30) and shutouts (6) in 1954, earning him his first All-Star Game appearance and the 1954 NL The Sporting News Pitcher of the Year award. Antonelli began his career with the Boston Braves (1948-1950) throwing in spots, but never finding a permanent position in the rotation or bullpen. He spent two years in the armed forces, and then returned to the newly relocated Milwaukee Braves for a season (1953). In 1954, he was traded to the New York Giants where he was added to a rotation that included Ruben Gomez and Sal Maglie. Johnny pitched for seven seasons with the New York/San Francisco Giants (1954-1957/1958-1960), and then finished his career in 1961 splitting time with the Cleveland Indians and Milwaukee Braves. He was a six-times All-Star who led the NL in shutouts twice in his 12-year career. In 1954, he helped the Giants capture the World Series over the Cleveland Indians winning Game 2. Johnny Antonelli wrapped up his career after compiling a 126-110 record with a 3.34 ERA, 1,162 strikeouts and 25 shutouts.

Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra (May 12, 1925 - September 22, 2015) was one of the most colorful, beloved and most talented players the game of baseball has ever seen. Berra’s parents, immigrants from Italy, settled in St. Louis’ Italian neighborhood, known as “The Hill”. Larry, or Lawdie as his parents called him in a heavy Italian accent, spent much of his time playing baseball rather than focusing on his studies and eventually dropped out f school as an eighth grader. He took on a few jobs to help make ends met for the family, but was often fired for leaving work early to play ball with his friends as they were dismissed from school. Future Major Leaguer Joe Garagiola, his closest friend, grew up a block away and played American Legion ball with Larry. It was there that friend and teammate, Bobby Hofman (also a future Major Leaguer) nicknamed Larry “Yogi” because he often sat crossed legged and cross-armed on the ground due to a full bench. It stuck! The two were eventually offered contracts with the St. Louis Cardinals, though the 6’0” Garagiola was offered a $500 bonus and Berra nothing so he rejected the Cards offer. Though he was ultimately turned away by his hometown team, potentially by general manager Branch Rickey, who had sights on signing Yogi once he became the GM for the Brooklyn Dodgers shortly thereafter, the New York Yankees signed the 5’8” 185 lbs. stout outfielder in 1943, giving him the same $500 bonus that Garagiola received. Because the Yanks were relatively stacked in the outfield with the likes of Joe DiMaggio, Johnny Lindell and Tommy Henrich, and Yogi was less than impressive in the outfield, New York converted him to a catcher in the minor leagues, working under the expert tutelage of Hall of Famer catcher Bill Dickey. Berra later credited Dickey for his success saying, “I owe everything I did in baseball to Bill Dickey.”

Martin Whiteford Marion (December 1, 1917 - March 15, 2011) played his entire career as a shortstop in St. Louis with the Cardinals (1940-1950) and the Browns (1952-1953). Due to his tall, lanky build and freakishly long arms able to scoop up grounders as if they were tentacles earned him the nickname “The Octopus.” Marion was an exceptional fielder, leading National League shortstops in fielding percentage four times and posting a career .969 fielding percentage in 12 seasons. Due to a trick knee, Marion was exempt from military service during World War II. In 1942, he led the NL in doubles with 38 and in 1944 was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player behind a .267 average, 135 hits including 26 doubles and 63 RBI as he guided the Cards to the 1944 World Series championship over the cross-town Browns. Marty was an eight-time All-Star selection from 1943-1950 and was a World Series champion three times (1942, 1944, 1946). Marty Marion retired with a .263 career batting average with 1,448 hits including 272 doubles, 602 runs and 624 RBI. Marion managed the 1951 Cardinals before taking over the helm of the Browns in 1952 as player/manager. He moved on to manage the Chicago White Sox to three third place finishes from 1954-1956. In six seasons as a Major League skipper, Marion compiled a 356-372 record in 731 games.

Albert Fred “Red” Schoendienst (February 2, 1923 - June 6, 2018) played 19 seasons at second base and left field with the St. Louis Cardinals (1945-1956, 1961-1963), the New York Giants (1956-1957) and the Milwaukee Braves (1957-1960). In his rookie season, he led the National League in stolen bases with 26, but resolved after the following season to focus on hitting and fielding. Red hit better than .300 in seven seasons and led the NL in fielding percentage six times. Schoendienst was a t10-time All-Star selection and was among the top ten in voting for the NL Most Valuable Player Award twelve times (never winning). Red Schoendienst retired with 2,449 hits, 1,223 runs, 773 RBI and a .289 career batting average. As a player, Schoendienst won two World Series titles with the 1946 Cardinals and 1957 Braves. He added another three championships with the Cardinal organization, as manager in 1967, and as a member of the coaching staff in 1964 and 1982. Red has donned a Major League uniform for seven decades The Veterans Committee elected Albert Fred “Red” Schoendienst to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

Don Richard “Richie” Ashburn (March 19, 1927 - September 9, 1997) played 15 seasons at centerfield for the Philadelphia Phillies (1948-1959), the Chicago Cubs (1960-1961) and the New York Mets (1962) and quickly moved to the broadcast booth after retirement. Ashburn was a member of the Phillies 1950 National League Champion “Whiz Kids” whose average age was 26 years old. What Ashburn lacked in power, hitting a career 29 home runs, he made up in consistency spraying 2,574 singles to all fields. Richie led the National League in hits three times in his career (1951, 1953 and 1958) and twice won the National League’s batting title (1955 and 1958). Richie Ashburn had more hits (1875) than any other player in the 1950s. After Ashburn retired in 1962, he joined the Philadelphia Phillies broadcast crew in 1963 where he remained for over 30 years. The Veterans Committee elected Don Richard “Richie” Ashburn to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995.

Roy Campanella (November 19, 1921 - June 26, 1993) is widely considered one of the greatest catchers of all time, and could easily be taken as the best ever, given the fact that he lost nearly a decade of Major League playing time to racism with Major League Baseball refusing to allow African-Americans entry into the league until 1947. And then, at 35, he lost several more years of his career to a near-fatal automobile accident that claimed not only his remaining playing days, but also the use of his legs for the rest of his life. As a child of the Great Depression, Roy was forced to work as a young boy in order to help his family make ends meet, but he did also excel in football, basketball and baseball during his high school years. Baseball, however, was his passion and Campanella signed with the Bacharach Giants as a 15-year old and then moved on to the Baltimore Elite Giants. He quickly became one of the Negro Leagues’ best catchers, rivaling future Hall of Famer Josh Gibson, and in 1941 we was named the MVP of the East-West All-Star Game. Roy spent two seasons playing in Mexico in 1942 and 1943 amidst a contract dispute before returning to the Giants in 1944. After appearing in an exhibition series at Ebbets Field against the Brooklyn Dodgers, Dodgers manager Charles Dressen arranged for Campanella to meet with general manager Branch Rickey, who immediately invited the husky backstop a contract. Though he politely declined, feeling this was a ruse, he would later ink his name on a contract with Dem Bums and ultimately follow in the footsteps of color barrier breaker, Jackie Robinson. Despite taking a substantial pay-cut from $600 catching for Baltimore, Campanella accepted the $180 monthly stipend to play for the Nashua (NH) Dodgers for a chance to play in the Major Leagues. That year with Nashua, following the ejection of manager Walt Alston, Campanella took over the managerial reigns, thus becoming the first African-American to manage in professional organized baseball.

Vernon Decatur “Junior” Stephens (October 23, 1920 - November 3, 1968) was one of the great power hitting shortstops of the 1940s and 1950s, but also possessed a superior glove that rivaled his contemporaries Phil Rizzuto, Johnny Pesky, Marty Marion, Pee Wee Reese and Lou Boudreau. Vern followed in his brother Harry’s footsteps, signing with the Browns at 17 and became an everyday player in 1942 at the age of 21. (His brother abandoned his career after an injury.) In his first full season at short for the St. Louis Browns, he batted .294 with 169 hits including 14 home runs and drove in another 92 finishing fourth in Most Valuable Player voting. Vern would garner consideration for the MVP award nine times in his 15-year career and he was named to eight National League All-Star teams. He failed his medical exam twice to enter the service during World War II and thus he became one of the great wartime players. However, his skill at short and at the plate remained constant even after the stars returned from war. In 1944, Stephens led the league in RBI for the first of three times during his career and led the Browns to their one and only World Series against cross-town the rival Cardinals. The Cards won in six. In 1945, he led the AL in home runs with 24. Seeking more money from the Browns as one of the elite players in the American League, Vern nearly derailed his career when he signed with the outlaw Mexican League as they attempted to poach big name players from the Major Leagues in 1946, to which Major League Commissioner Happy Chandler instituted a five-year ban on any player who did not return to the US within ten days. Stephen’ father and Browns’ scout Jack Fournier, unwilling to let Vern throw his career away, drove to Monterey, Mexico and returned the shortstop to the United States. Vern Stephens played 15 years in the Majors with the Browns (1941-1947, 1953), the Boston Red Sox (1948-1952), the Chicago White Sox (1953, 1955) and the Baltimore Orioles (1954-1955). Vern Stephens finished his career with a .286 batting average, 1,859 hits including 247 home runs, 1,001 runs scored and 1,174 RBI in 15 seasons with four Major League clubs. He is the only player to have played for both the St. Louis Browns American League pennant winning team and the Baltimore Orioles, after the Browns team relocated to Baltimore to become the Orioles.

irgil Oliver “Fire” Trucks (April 26, 1917 - March 23, 2013) was a beloved Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher who, in 1952, became only the third player to throw two no-hitters in a single season. The Detroit Tigers signed Trucks as an amateur free agent in 1938, and in his first minor league season, he set a minor league record for strikeouts (418) … and his “blazing” fastball earned him the nickname “Fire.” Virgil also threw an amazing four minor league no-hitters before joining the Tigers (1941-1943, 1945-1952, 1956) for a lengthy career. With his playing career interrupted by service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he returned to the mound in time to pitch (and win) Game 2 of the 1945 World Series – a series that the Tigers would go on to win over the Chicago Cubs. A two-time All-Star (1949, 1954), Trucks led the American League in shutouts (6) and strikeouts (153) in 1949, and in 1952 -- despite posting an overall record of 5-19 -- hurled two no-hitters. (At the time he joined Johnny Vander Meer and Allie Reynolds on the list of two no-hitters in one year). Though best remembered for his days in the Motor City, Virgil also took the mound for the St. Louis Browns (1953), Chicago White Sox (1953-1955), Kansas City Athletics (1957-1958), and New York Yankees (1958) during his playing days. He retired with a 177-135 record with a 3.39 career ERA and 1,534 strikeouts, and later spent several seasons as a coach for the Pittsburgh Pirates, including the 1960 World Series championship team.

Warren Edward Spahn (April 23, 1921 - November 24, 2003) is the winningest left-handed pitcher in the history of the Major Leagues with 363 victories. Topping the 20-win mark 13 times during his 21-year career made him one of the most dominant pitchers in the National League in any era. Spahn pitched for the Boston/Milwaukee Braves (1942, 1946-1964) for virtually his entire career, earning 17 All-Star selections. Spahn was the ace of the Braves pitching staff helping the heavy hitting squad to three National League pennants and one World Series Championship in 1957. Warren also captured the Cy Young Award in 1957 after posting a 21-11 record with 18 complete games, 130 strikeouts and a 2.69 ERA. Warren Spahn threw his first no-hitter in 1960 at the age of 39 and his second the following year. At age 42, Spahn’s extraordinary durability was exemplified in 1963 when he faced San Francisco’s Hall of Fame pitcher Juan Marichal in a 16-inning loss where Spahn threw 201 pitches and Marichal hurled 227 to take the 1-0 win. Warren Spahn retired in 1965 with a 363-245 record, 2,583 strikeouts and a 3.08 earned run average. Warren Edward Spahn was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973.

Some would argue that even though Berra’s 1952 Topps is not his rookie or his most difficult card, it might be the most popular one on which the 10-time World Series champion appeared during his playing days. It has its advantages, including a slightly larger format, nice color, and the card is part of the most important post-WWII set in the hobby. That said, the nod would still have to go to Berra’s mainstream debut (#6) in the 1948 Bowman set. The issue may not receive any awards for outstanding design, but its simplicity is part of the appeal. The black-and-white format showcases a young Berra who helped continue a tradition of great Yankees catchers after Bill Dickey left the game. Berra’s Bowman rookie remains one of the keys to this 48-card set that contains several other Hall of Famer rookies like Musial and Warren Spahn.

Allie Pierce Reynolds (February 10, 1917 - December 26, 1994) was drafted by the New York Giants as a halfback out of Oklahoma A&M, now Oklahoma State, but Reynolds chose baseball as he preferred the diamond to the gridiron and saw greater riches in baseball. He signed with the Cleveland Indians in 1939 and spent three seasons in the minors honing his pitching skills. In 1942, after floundering in the minors, Allie considered retirement, but was called up to the Majors after he went 18-7 with a 1.56 ERA, threw 11 shutouts, 193 strikeouts and 21 complete games in his final year with Wilkes-Barre. Reynolds was added to the depleted Cleveland Indians pitching staff in 1943 as manager Lou Boudreau utilized the big, durable right-hander as a reliever between starts. Allie Reynolds pitched 13 seasons in the big with the Indians (1942-1946) and the New York Yankees (1947-1954). Superchief, as he was called due to his American-Indian heritage, won ten or more games in every full season he played in the American League, posting a career high 20 wins in 1952. That same season, Allie led the AL in earned run average (2.06), and shutouts (6) for a second straight year. He also led the AL in strikeouts (151) in his rookie campaign (1943). Allie Reynolds was a six-time MLB All-Star selection and helped the New York Yankees win six World Series titles (1947, 1949-1953). Reynolds compiled a record of 182-107 in 434 games with 137 complete games, 49 saves, 1,423 strikeouts and a career 3.30 ERA.

The area known as Argo is located eight miles west of Chicago’s old Comiskey Park in Summit, Illinois, a lowdown five-figure village in Cook County known for a corn milling and processing plant that is among the largest of its kind – and has the odor to prove it. It was also home to Ted “Klu” Kluszewski, the 6-foot-2, 225-pound mountain of a man with the famous 15-inch biceps, whose legend in baseball history will live even longer and go farther than the home runs he hit decades ago. Kluszewski has often been referred to as one of the most underappreciated players of the post-World War II era; one whose accomplishments as a player and a coach have remained under the radar far too long. In the mid-1950s “Klu” was the original “Big Red Machine,” a long-ball hitter and run-producer without peer. In the four seasons from 1953 to 1956, he averaged 179 hits, 43 homers, and 116 RBIs, numbers every bit as impressive as those of Eddie Mathews (152-41-109) of the Milwaukee Braves and Duke Snider (180-42-123) of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the same period. It's not a stretch to believe that if Kluszewski had stayed healthy and productive for four or five more seasons, he would have joined Mathews and Snider in the Hall of Fame. Despite an abbreviated career, his 251 homers while he was with rank fifth on the Reds’ all-time list.

Robert Leonard "Dutch" McCall (December 27, 1920 – January 8, 1996) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played for the Chicago Cubs. During World War II, McCall served in the United States Army rising to the rank of Corporal. He is buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery

Lucius Benjamin Appling (April 2, 1907 - January 3, 1991) played his entire major league baseball career (1930-1950) at shortstop for the Chicago White Sox. “Old Aches and Pains” as he was called due to his constant complaints about minor ailments, had an uncanny ability to foul off pitch after pitch until he saw the one that he could drive for a base hit. Batting third in the weak offensive White Sox order, Appling batted .300 or better for nine consecutive seasons (1933-1941) and drove in 1,116 RBI during his career. During his 20-year career, Appling batted below the .300 mark only four times and retired with a career .310 batting average. In 1936, Luke became the first shortstop in the American League to win a batting title at .388, and won his second in 1943 batting .328. Lucius Benjamin Appling was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.