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$225 is SMR for a non-qulified PSA 2

$225 is SMR for a non-qulified PSA 2

Harry Lewis “Bill” Bailey (1881-1967) played the outfield and third base for five games in a New York Highlanders uniform in 1911. Bill batted .111 with one hit and one run and two strikeouts in nine plate appearances. He posted a 1.000 fielding percentage as a third baseman with three assists on three chances.

Harry Lewis “Bill” Bailey (1881-1967) played the outfield and third base for five games in a New York Highlanders uniform in 1911. Bill batted .111 with one hit and one run and two strikeouts in nine plate appearances. He posted a 1.000 fielding percentage as a third baseman with three assists on three chances.

Owen Joseph “Donie” Bush (1887-1972) deprived a young Red Sox pitching phenom named Babe Ruth a no-hitter when he knocked a single in the eighth inning, the only hit allowed by the Bambino. Bush played shortstop for 16 seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1908-1921) and the Washington Senators (1921-1923). Donie shares the Major League record of most triple plays all-time (9) with McPhee. Bush also holds the all-time records for most putouts (425) and chances (969) in a season by a shortstop. He was an excellent fielder and possessed a keen eye at the plate, drawing numerous walks and leading the league five times from 1909-1914. Donie posted .250 career batting average with 1,804 hits, 1,280 runs, 436 RBI and 406 stolen bases. As a manager, Bush won one National League pennant with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927) and had a 497-539 record at the helm of four different teams (Senators, Pirates, White Sox Reds). Bush has been criticized for his clash with star right fielder Kiki Cuyler could have cost the 1927 Pirates the World Series, as Bush benched the Hall of Famer for the end of the season.

Owen Joseph “Donie” Bush (1887-1972) deprived a young Red Sox pitching phenom named Babe Ruth a no-hitter when he knocked a single in the eighth inning, the only hit allowed by the Bambino. Bush played shortstop for 16 seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1908-1921) and the Washington Senators (1921-1923). Donie shares the Major League record of most triple plays all-time (9) with McPhee. Bush also holds the all-time records for most putouts (425) and chances (969) in a season by a shortstop. He was an excellent fielder and possessed a keen eye at the plate, drawing numerous walks and leading the league five times from 1909-1914. Donie posted .250 career batting average with 1,804 hits, 1,280 runs, 436 RBI and 406 stolen bases. As a manager, Bush won one National League pennant with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927) and had a 497-539 record at the helm of four different teams (Senators, Pirates, White Sox Reds). Bush has been criticized for his clash with star right fielder Kiki Cuyler could have cost the 1927 Pirates the World Series, as Bush benched the Hall of Famer for the end of the season.

Hughie Ambrose Jennings (1869-1928) was a shortstop for the Baltimore Orioles in the 1890s that produced seven hall of Famers, including himself and the manager, Ned Hanlon. He was an excellent shortstop and was a confident and successful hitter at the plate retiring with a .314 career batting average. Jennings made the transition from player to manager, managing the Detroit Tigers from 1907-1920 and guiding them to three American League pennants (1907, 1908, 1909). “Ee-yah”, his catch phrase and trademark, could be heard from the clubhouse, encouraging his players and team during games. Hughie Jennings finished his playing career with a .314 batting average, accumulated 1,520 hits and stole 374 bases. As a manager, his Detroit Tigers (1907-1920) and New York Giants (1924-1925) teams won 1,131 games with a .538 winning percentage. The Veterans Committee elected Hugh Ambrose Jennings to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945.

Hughie Ambrose Jennings (1869-1928) was a shortstop for the Baltimore Orioles in the 1890s that produced seven hall of Famers, including himself and the manager, Ned Hanlon. He was an excellent shortstop and was a confident and successful hitter at the plate retiring with a .314 career batting average. Jennings made the transition from player to manager, managing the Detroit Tigers from 1907-1920 and guiding them to three American League pennants (1907, 1908, 1909). “Ee-yah”, his catch phrase and trademark, could be heard from the clubhouse, encouraging his players and team during games. Hughie Jennings finished his playing career with a .314 batting average, accumulated 1,520 hits and stole 374 bases. As a manager, his Detroit Tigers (1907-1920) and New York Giants (1924-1925) teams won 1,131 games with a .538 winning percentage. The Veterans Committee elected Hugh Ambrose Jennings to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945.

George C. Gibson (1880-1967) set a Pittsburgh Pirates record catching 1,113 games from 1905 to 1916. George had an excellent ability to handle his pitching staff and helped lead the Pirates to the 1909 World Series championship over the Detroit Tigers. Despite being a relatively large figure behind the plate for his era at 5’10” and 190 lbs., he showed little power at the plate hitting a mere 15 home runs during his 14-year Major League career. He played 12 seasons in Pittsburgh (1905-1916) before finishing his career with the New York Giants (1917-1918). He is the first Canadian-born Major Leaguer to be inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. He finished his playing career with a .236 career batting average with 893 hits, 295 runs and 345 RBI in 1,213 games. Following his playing days, he spent brief stints managing the Pirates (1920-1922, 1932-1934) and the Chicago Cubs (1925) compiling a 413-344 record in 759 games.

George C. Gibson (1880-1967) set a Pittsburgh Pirates record catching 1,113 games from 1905 to 1916. George had an excellent ability to handle his pitching staff and helped lead the Pirates to the 1909 World Series championship over the Detroit Tigers. Despite being a relatively large figure behind the plate for his era at 5’10” and 190 lbs., he showed little power at the plate hitting a mere 15 home runs during his 14-year Major League career. He played 12 seasons in Pittsburgh (1905-1916) before finishing his career with the New York Giants (1917-1918). He is the first Canadian-born Major Leaguer to be inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. He finished his playing career with a .236 career batting average with 893 hits, 295 runs and 345 RBI in 1,213 games. Following his playing days, he spent brief stints managing the Pirates (1920-1922, 1932-1934) and the Chicago Cubs (1925) compiling a 413-344 record in 759 games.

John Franklin “Home Run” Baker (1886-1963) was considered the greatest third baseman of the pre-war era and was a member of the Philadelphia Athletics famous $100,000 infield from 1910-1914. By today’s standards, Baker might be considered an average player, but his slugging power earned him the nickname “Home Run” for swatting two Home runs during the 1911 World Series and finishing his career with 96 in total. “Home Run” Baker led the league in round-trippers in four consecutive years from 1911-1914 having never hit more than 12 in on season. Baker played for the Athletics from 1908-1914, when a contract dispute with Hall of Fame manager, Connie Mack, caused him to sit out the entire 1915 season and forced his eventual sale to the New York Yankees. Baker hit .307, 96 home runs and drove in 987 RBI in his career. The Veterans Committee elected John Franklin “Home Run” Baker to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

John Franklin “Home Run” Baker (1886-1963) was considered the greatest third baseman of the pre-war era and was a member of the Philadelphia Athletics famous $100,000 infield from 1910-1914. By today’s standards, Baker might be considered an average player, but his slugging power earned him the nickname “Home Run” for swatting two Home runs during the 1911 World Series and finishing his career with 96 in total. “Home Run” Baker led the league in round-trippers in four consecutive years from 1911-1914 having never hit more than 12 in on season. Baker played for the Athletics from 1908-1914, when a contract dispute with Hall of Fame manager, Connie Mack, caused him to sit out the entire 1915 season and forced his eventual sale to the New York Yankees. Baker hit .307, 96 home runs and drove in 987 RBI in his career. The Veterans Committee elected John Franklin “Home Run” Baker to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Only 7 for the entire brand and only 3 higher.

Only 7 for the entire brand and only 3 higher.

Only 2 higher for the brand.

Only 2 higher for the brand.

Only 2 higher for the brand/ grade.

Only 2 higher for the brand/ grade.

Pop 3. Only one higher for the brand.

Pop 3. Only one higher for the brand.

Perfect games within one pitch and hit batsmen on 2-2 count, and then completed a 1-0 no-hitter in 10 innings.

Perfect games within one pitch and hit batsmen on 2-2 count, and then completed a 1-0 no-hitter in 10 innings.

Purchased as BVG and converted grade to PSA in July 2019

Purchased as BVG and converted grade to PSA in July 2019

Purchased as BVG and converted grade to PSA in July 2019

Purchased as BVG and converted grade to PSA in July 2019

Walter Johnson's catcher

Walter Johnson's catcher

HOFer Inaugural Class WWI Vet (Army)

Gave up first HR to Babe Ruth

Gave up first HR to Babe Ruth

Only 9 total for the brand, and pop 7. None higher.

Only 9 total for the brand, and pop 7. None higher.

Pop 4. Pop higher 3 for the brand/grade.

Pop 4. Pop higher 3 for the brand/grade.

authentic American Beauty

authentic American Beauty