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My dad would call us Andy Gump when we were kids. I still don't get it.

My dad would call us Andy Gump when we were kids. I still don't get it.

Was manscaping a thing back in the 30s?

Was manscaping a thing back in the 30s?

You can trust your carrd to the man who is the Starr!

You can trust your carrd to the man who is the Starr!

Good night Sibby Sisti wherever you are!

Good night Sibby Sisti wherever you are!

What the heck is he using here? Duct tape, super glue, nails, Flex Seal? One of my all-time favorite baseball cards!

What the heck is he using here? Duct tape, super glue, nails, Flex Seal? One of my all-time favorite baseball cards!

I like mustard on my french fried taters Um...Hmm...

I like mustard on my french fried taters Um...Hmm...

I'm not sure if it's better to get a hit or to fowl one off! Maybe a walk on 4 balls is the best option??

I'm not sure if it's better to get a hit or to fowl one off! Maybe a walk on 4 balls is the best option??

He jonesing for a we nip!

He jonesing for a we nip!

Dick or Dyke...you make the call!

Dick or Dyke...you make the call!

I've heard of Shark Week but not Dick Weik. I wanna know when it's on the Discovery Channel!

I've heard of Shark Week but not Dick Weik. I wanna know when it's on the Discovery Channel!

With a name like Forrest Vandergrift, I'd be scared too!

With a name like Forrest Vandergrift, I'd be scared too!

Too much friction here could start a fire!

Too much friction here could start a fire!

Now that's an eyebrow!

Now that's an eyebrow!

BIG MONEY...BIG MONEY...!

BIG MONEY...BIG MONEY...!

Cialis, now with Vitamin D!

Cialis, now with Vitamin D!

He must have been in an old black and white adult movie!

He must have been in an old black and white adult movie!

In 1975, my dad was transferred to the Chicago area. It was a baseball fans dream. Two major league teams and baseball on TV every day. By this time I was obsessed with collecting cards and let everyone know it. A classmate of mine told me his older brother collected cards. I met with him and we immediately became friends. Turned out that he was a member of the Chicagoland Collectors Association, a group of people that collected trading cards. Since he could drive, he took me to a meeting where I was amazed and surprised to find out that adults also collected cards. It was then that I found out that card collecting was an organized hobby and there was a much bigger collecting world that awaited me. I joined the club during my first meeting and was able to attend many more meetings. During that first meeting I bought my first card from the 1950’s. It was a 1959 Topps Ernie Banks. I remember paying $5 for the card. There was probably a Chicago premium attach to that price but I didn't care. Since there were no card supplies in those days I used a crayon box to store the card. It remains to this day my favorite card of the 1950’s.

In 1975, my dad was transferred to the Chicago area. It was a baseball fans dream. Two major league teams and baseball on TV every day. By this time I was obsessed with collecting cards and let everyone know it. A classmate of mine told me his older brother collected cards. I met with him and we immediately became friends. Turned out that he was a member of the Chicagoland Collectors Association, a group of people that collected trading cards. Since he could drive, he took me to a meeting where I was amazed and surprised to find out that adults also collected cards. It was then that I found out that card collecting was an organized hobby and there was a much bigger collecting world that awaited me. I joined the club during my first meeting and was able to attend many more meetings. During that first meeting I bought my first card from the 1950’s. It was a 1959 Topps Ernie Banks. I remember paying $5 for the card. There was probably a Chicago premium attach to that price but I didn't care. Since there were no card supplies in those days I used a crayon box to store the card. It remains to this day my favorite card of the 1950’s.

He must stay out in the cold pretty often!

He must stay out in the cold pretty often!

Throw that funky baseball white boy...

Man, he knows how to grow a uni brow !

Man, he knows how to grow a uni brow !

Now we who is in charge of housing Dicks!

Now we who is in charge of housing Dicks!

He's ass-king for it!

He's ass-king for it!

He always beats the other team by a huge margarine!

He always beats the other team by a huge margarine!

We know what Blacksmiths and Wordsmiths do. What does does a Dick Smith do?

We know what Blacksmiths and Wordsmiths do. What does does a Dick Smith do?

A woodpecker in the hand is worth two in the bush!

A woodpecker in the hand is worth two in the bush!

Claude...for the love of God...XYZ!!!

Claude...for the love of God...XYZ!!!

Nothing like Dicks in different shades and colors!

Nothing like Dicks in different shades and colors!

The Dick Nen - In the end, there can be only one!

The Dick Nen - In the end, there can be only one!

Must get lonely drinking in the bathroom stall alone!

Must get lonely drinking in the bathroom stall alone!

Sounds like he needs to go see Lorena Bobbitt!

Sounds like he needs to go see Lorena Bobbitt!

My name says Cool but my eyes say laser heat!

My name says Cool but my eyes say laser heat!

The year was 1971. In our Louisville neighborhood, we were all baseball fans and the Cincinnati Reds were our team. One early spring day, while we were playing outside, one of the kids next door showed me something called baseball cards. They were images of our heroes on cardboard and I was in awe plus they came with bubble gum. The simplicity and beauty of the cards struck a chord with me and I was in love. The next day, I was out with my dad and we stopped at Woolworths. I went to the candy aisle and there they were, pristine packs of baseball cards. I asked my dad if he would buy a couple of packs and he obliged. I opened the packs immediately once we got to the car. In that moment. I was hooked on collecting. Little did I know at the time that a lifelong love affair with collecting trading cards had begun. One of my favorite cards from that first series of 1971 Topps is the Pete Rose card. It took a few packs but I was able to snag one and I was the envy of the neighborhood…at least until the Johnny Bench card came out later in series 2.

The year was 1971. In our Louisville neighborhood, we were all baseball fans and the Cincinnati Reds were our team. One early spring day, while we were playing outside, one of the kids next door showed me something called baseball cards. They were images of our heroes on cardboard and I was in awe plus they came with bubble gum. The simplicity and beauty of the cards struck a chord with me and I was in love. The next day, I was out with my dad and we stopped at Woolworths. I went to the candy aisle and there they were, pristine packs of baseball cards. I asked my dad if he would buy a couple of packs and he obliged. I opened the packs immediately once we got to the car. In that moment. I was hooked on collecting. Little did I know at the time that a lifelong love affair with collecting trading cards had begun. One of my favorite cards from that first series of 1971 Topps is the Pete Rose card. It took a few packs but I was able to snag one and I was the envy of the neighborhood…at least until the Johnny Bench card came out later in series 2.

I guess everyone thought this guy was Such a Dick!

For a second there, I thought this was John Riggins!

Bummer…in 1976 my family moved from the Chicago area to the Memphis area. The reason was that my mom hated living up north and demanded we move back south. I loved it up there and really hated to move. Once landing in Memphis, I had one mission…find fellow collectors. By going to flea markets and local hobby shops I quickly found other like-minded collecting souls. Memphis had no formal card collectors club so we quickly formed one and had our own monthly meetings/shows at our main library. During that same year, MSA discs hit the market. I immediately was infatuated with these little discs and had to collect them all. As luck would have it, there was a Carousel Snack Bar in the mall several miles away and they had the discs. You had to buy a hot dog, large popcorn or cotton candy to get a disc. I had no job, so applied for my first real job at Carousel and got it. Most of the customers did not want the discs when offered, so I asked if they would let me have it and most folks obliged. I was able to make a ton of sets that way. I traded for other sets and built a groovy collection of discs. One of my favorites was the Hank Aaron disc. This example is from my original Carousel Snack bar disc set. The mall is gone now but the memories remain fresh and live in my heart forever.

Bummer…in 1976 my family moved from the Chicago area to the Memphis area. The reason was that my mom hated living up north and demanded we move back south. I loved it up there and really hated to move. Once landing in Memphis, I had one mission…find fellow collectors. By going to flea markets and local hobby shops I quickly found other like-minded collecting souls. Memphis had no formal card collectors club so we quickly formed one and had our own monthly meetings/shows at our main library. During that same year, MSA discs hit the market. I immediately was infatuated with these little discs and had to collect them all. As luck would have it, there was a Carousel Snack Bar in the mall several miles away and they had the discs. You had to buy a hot dog, large popcorn or cotton candy to get a disc. I had no job, so applied for my first real job at Carousel and got it. Most of the customers did not want the discs when offered, so I asked if they would let me have it and most folks obliged. I was able to make a ton of sets that way. I traded for other sets and built a groovy collection of discs. One of my favorites was the Hank Aaron disc. This example is from my original Carousel Snack bar disc set. The mall is gone now but the memories remain fresh and live in my heart forever.

He always starts in first place by giving people the shaft!

He always starts in first place by giving people the shaft!

This card scared the crap out of me when I was younger. Wait a second, I'm still scared!!! #ThisCardGivesMeTheWillies

This card scared the crap out of me when I was younger. Wait a second, I'm still scared!!! #ThisCardGivesMeTheWillies

Time for a TED Talk on the Birds and the Bees!

Time for a TED Talk on the Birds and the Bees!

Must have contracted it from Rusty Peters!

A year rolls around and it’s 1989. I’m at work and my boss knows I collect cards. He shows me an article in USA Today. It’s a 1989 Fleer Billy Ripken base card and it’s like “Houston, we have a problem”. There’s an obscenity on his bat handle which is now lovingly known as the Billy Ripken FF error. In the article, it mentions that this card is selling for 100’s of dollars on the secondary market and if you know me, it was game on. I had to have this card. At that time, we had 7/11 stores here in Memphis and I had a friend that was a store manager. 7/11 carried trading cards in those days. It was such a glorious time to collect cards. Anyway, I asked he if he would keep me informed if and when they were going to get Fleer baseball cards. It didn’t take long and few days later I got the call that the 7/11 stores were each getting two boxes of the coveted 1989 Fleer baseball later that night. During that time, my wife was a huge Mets fan and enjoyed collecting cards as well. We decided we would split up and divide and conquer hitting twice as many stores. I went south and she went north. I had a digital pager for work and that is how we kept in touch. She would page me from a store and I would find a pay phone and call her to make sure she was safe and to get a tally on our haul. We were able to score over 30 boxes that night and luckily they were all of the FF variety. At the time we had no idea there would be so many variations of the correction. This PSA 10 1989 Billy Ripken FF error pays homage to a special time in the hobby and a night that will always be near and dear to my heart. I sure do miss those days.

A year rolls around and it’s 1989. I’m at work and my boss knows I collect cards. He shows me an article in USA Today. It’s a 1989 Fleer Billy Ripken base card and it’s like “Houston, we have a problem”. There’s an obscenity on his bat handle which is now lovingly known as the Billy Ripken FF error. In the article, it mentions that this card is selling for 100’s of dollars on the secondary market and if you know me, it was game on. I had to have this card. At that time, we had 7/11 stores here in Memphis and I had a friend that was a store manager. 7/11 carried trading cards in those days. It was such a glorious time to collect cards. Anyway, I asked he if he would keep me informed if and when they were going to get Fleer baseball cards. It didn’t take long and few days later I got the call that the 7/11 stores were each getting two boxes of the coveted 1989 Fleer baseball later that night. During that time, my wife was a huge Mets fan and enjoyed collecting cards as well. We decided we would split up and divide and conquer hitting twice as many stores. I went south and she went north. I had a digital pager for work and that is how we kept in touch. She would page me from a store and I would find a pay phone and call her to make sure she was safe and to get a tally on our haul. We were able to score over 30 boxes that night and luckily they were all of the FF variety. At the time we had no idea there would be so many variations of the correction. This PSA 10 1989 Billy Ripken FF error pays homage to a special time in the hobby and a night that will always be near and dear to my heart. I sure do miss those days.

More of a Richard Cranium if you ask me...LOL!

More of a Richard Cranium if you ask me...LOL!

“Throw me a frickin' bone here."

“Throw me a frickin' bone here."

I think you can buy these on QVC After-hours!

I think you can buy these on QVC After-hours!

He needs some care and wellness tips from Dick Shiner!

Here it comes. 1994 brings with it the Major League Baseball strike. At this time, I totally loved baseball but things had changed so much over the past few years. Players had become un-approachable and were shunning their fan base. I was starting to lose interest in the game due to players attitudes towards their fans. Heck, I don’t even remember what the strike was even about. I just remember that it seemed like the players didn’t care anymore. By this time, NASCAR was becoming more mainstream and you had a hard time getting tickets to races. The drivers were exciting to watch and they really cared about their fan base. They were very approachable and were happy to talk with you for a couple of moments. There was such a mammoth gap between MLB and NASCAR on how they cared about and treated their fans. So when MLB cancelled the rest of the 1994 season and post season, I made the decision to stop watching baseball and collecting baseball cards. That was the toughest collecting decision I had ever made. It was just a natural and logical choice to shift my primary collecting focus to NASCAR. Before the strike, Bo Jackson was my guy. He played minor league ball here in Memphis. This 1994 Topps Bo Jackson card symbolizes my foray into baseball and saying goodbye to a sport I loved. Definitely the end of a collecting era for me. I still love Bo and collect him but NASCAR now rules my hobby life.

Here it comes. 1994 brings with it the Major League Baseball strike. At this time, I totally loved baseball but things had changed so much over the past few years. Players had become un-approachable and were shunning their fan base. I was starting to lose interest in the game due to players attitudes towards their fans. Heck, I don’t even remember what the strike was even about. I just remember that it seemed like the players didn’t care anymore. By this time, NASCAR was becoming more mainstream and you had a hard time getting tickets to races. The drivers were exciting to watch and they really cared about their fan base. They were very approachable and were happy to talk with you for a couple of moments. There was such a mammoth gap between MLB and NASCAR on how they cared about and treated their fans. So when MLB cancelled the rest of the 1994 season and post season, I made the decision to stop watching baseball and collecting baseball cards. That was the toughest collecting decision I had ever made. It was just a natural and logical choice to shift my primary collecting focus to NASCAR. Before the strike, Bo Jackson was my guy. He played minor league ball here in Memphis. This 1994 Topps Bo Jackson card symbolizes my foray into baseball and saying goodbye to a sport I loved. Definitely the end of a collecting era for me. I still love Bo and collect him but NASCAR now rules my hobby life.

Does he have a brother named "Zong"?

Does he have a brother named "Zong"?

That's what happens when you don't catch it early and treat it!