ruth7140's Image Gallery

All Sets ›

Isidore "Izzy" Goldstein (June 6, 1908 - September 24, 1993) was a 6'0" right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. Born in Odessa, Russian Empire, Goldstein played only one season in the major leagues, appearing in 16 games (6 as a starter and 10 in relief) for the Detroit Tigers in 1932.

Edward Francis Lafitte (April 7, 1886 – April 12, 1971) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the Detroit Tigers (1909–12), Brooklyn Tip-Tops (1914–15), and Buffalo Blues (1915). Born in New Orleans, Louisiana at his family's home located at 319 Bourbon Street, he batted and threw right-handed.

Nicknamed "Moose", was an American college basketball standout and a professional baseball first baseman. During a 13-year career in Major League Baseball, he played for the Boston Red Sox (1949–1952), Detroit Tigers (1952–1954), Chicago White Sox (1955–1958), Cincinnati Redlegs (1958–1959) and Baltimore Orioles (1959–1961).

During his ten-year Major League career, Auker played with the Tigers, Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Browns. While with Detroit, Auker went to consecutive World Series, in 1934 and 1935. In the 1934 Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Auker was the winning pitcher in Game 4, but the loser to Dizzy Dean in the decisive Game 7. The next season, Auker led the American League in winning percentage with an 18-7 record. In the 1935 Series against the Chicago Cubs, Auker started Game 3, which Detroit won in extra innings, and the Tigers went on to win the Series 4 games to 2

Thomas Jefferson Davis Bridges (December 28, 1906 – April 19, 1968) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers from 1930 to 1946. During the 1930s he used an outstanding curveball to become one of the mainstays of the team's pitching staff, winning 20 games in three consecutive seasons and helping the team to its first World Series championship with two victories in the 1935 Series. He retired with 1674 career strikeouts, then the eighth highest total in American League history, and held the Tigers franchise record for career strikeouts from 1941 to 1951

Herman Earl "Flea" Clifton (December 12, 1909 – December 22, 1997), was a Major League Baseball infielder who played four seasons with the Detroit Tigers from 1934 to 1937.In the 1935 World Series, Clifton became the Tigers' starting third baseman when Hank Greenberg broke his wrist in Game 2. The Tigers' regular third baseman Marv Owen moved to first base and Clifton stepped in at third base. Clifton had played only 43 games during the regular season, with a .255 batting average, and went 0 for 16 with 4 strikeouts in the Series.

Gordon Stanley "Mickey" Cochrane (April 6, 1903 – June 28, 1962) was a professional baseball player and manager.[1] He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. Cochrane was considered one of the best catchers in baseball history and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Alvin Floyd Crowder (January 11, 1899 – April 3, 1972), nicknamed "General," was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played eleven seasons in the American League with the Washington Senators, the St. Louis Browns, and the Detroit Tigers(1934–1936). In 402 career games, Crowder pitched 2344.1 innings and posted w win-loss record of 167–115, with 150 complete games, 16 shutouts, and a 4.12 earned run average (ERA).

Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993), nicknamed “The Mechanical Man,” was a German-American Major League Baseball second baseman who played 19 seasons (1924–42) for the Detroit Tigers.[1] He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1949.

Leon Allen "Goose" Goslin (October 16, 1900 – May 15, 1971) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his powerful left-handed swing and dependable clutch hitting. He played 18 seasons with the Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, and Detroit Tigers, from 1921 until 1938. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1968.

Henry Benjamin "Hank" Greenberg (January 1, 1911 – September 4, 1986), nicknamed "Hammerin' Hank," "Hankus Pankus" or "The Hebrew Hammer," was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. A first baseman primarily for the Detroit Tigers, Greenberg was one of the premier power hitters of his generation. He hit 58 home runs in 1938, equaling Jimmie Foxx's 1932 mark for the most home runs in one season by any player between 1927 (when Babe Ruth set a record of 60) and 1961 (when Roger Maris surpassed it). Greenberg was a five-time All-Star, was twice named the American League's Most Valuable Player, and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1956. He became the first major league player to hit 25 or more home runs in a season in each league, and remains the American League (AL) record-holder for most RBIs in a single season by a right-handed batter (183 in 1937, a 154-game schedule). His career was shortened due to him serving 45 months in the U.S. Armed Forces in World War II.Detroit Tigers (1930, 19335× All-Star (1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1945) 2× World Series champion (1935, 1945) 2× AL MVP (1935, 1940) Detroit Tigers #5 retired–1941, 1945–1946)Pittsburgh Pirates (1947).

Raymond Hall Hayworth (January 29, 1904 – September 25, 2002) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1926 through 1945, Hayworth played for the Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants and St. Louis Browns. He batted and threw right-handed.A native of High Point, North Carolina, Ray Hayworth was a solid defensive catcher but a modest hitter. Hayworth, who worked in baseball for more than 50 years, spent 15 seasons in the majors, almost all of it with the Detroit Tigers. He played with Ty Cobb in 1926, Hayworth's rookie season, and Cobb's final season in Detroit.

Raymond Hall Hayworth (January 29, 1904 – September 25, 2002) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1926 through 1945, Hayworth played for the Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants and St. Louis Browns. He batted and threw right-handed

Elon Chester "Chief" Hogsett (November 2, 1903 – July 17, 2001) was a sub-marining left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played 11 seasons in the American League with the Detroit Tigers (1929–36; 1944), St. Louis Browns (1936–37), and Washington Senators (1938).

Chester Collins Morgan (June 6, 1910 – September 20, 1991), nicknamed "Chick," was a Major League Baseball player for the Detroit Tigers in 1935 (14 games) and 1938 (74 games). He was the starting center fielder for the Tigers in 1938. He played in 88 games for the Tigers in his career and had a batting average of .277 with a .330 on base percentage. Chick Morgan was born in Cleveland, Mississippi, and died in Pasadena, California.

Marvin James Owen (March 22, 1906 – June 22, 1991) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball. He played nine seasons in the American League with the Detroit Tigers (1931; 1933–37), Chicago White Sox (1938–39), and Boston Red Sox (1940).

Harvey Willos "Hub" Walker (August 17, 1906 – November 26, 1982) was a Major League Baseball outfielder who played five seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1931, 1935, 1945) and Cincinnati Reds (1936–1937). Born in Gulfport, Mississippi, Walker was the brother of Major League player, Gee Walker. Hub and his younger brother, Gee, were teammates both at the University of Mississippi and with the Detroit Tigers in 1931 and 1935. Hub Walker played in 297 Major League games, 211 in the outfield. Walker had a career . 263 batting average with a .354 on base percentage.Brother Gee Walker played for the Tigers in their 1935 World Series championship, and Hub played for the Tigers a decade late in their 1945 World Series championship.

Joyner Clifford "Jo-Jo" White (June 1, 1909 – October 9, 1986) was an American center fielder in professional baseball. He played nine seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1932–38), Philadelphia Athletics (1943–44), and Cincinnati Reds (1944). He also was the father of former major league outfielder Mike White.

Albert William "Al" Kaline born December 19, 1934 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a former Major League Baseball right fielder. He is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.[1][2] Kaline played his entire 22-year baseball career with the Detroit Tigers.[1] Immediately after retiring from playing, he became the Tigers' TV color commentator, a position he held until 2002. Kaline still works for the Tigers as a front office official.[3] Because of his lengthy career and longtime association with the Tigers organization, Kaline's nickname is "Mr. Tiger.

Richard William Bartell (November 22, 1907 – August 4, 1995), nicknamed "Rowdy Richard," was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball (MLB). One of the most ferocious competitors of his era, he won both admirers and critics at each stop during a career which saw him traded every few seasons, often under acrimonious circumstances. While hitting .300 over a full season five times, he led the National League in double plays four times and in putouts and assists three times each. From 1927 through 1946, Bartell played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927–30), Philadelphia Phillies (1931–34), New York Giants (1935–38, 1941), Chicago Cubs (1939) and Detroit Tigers (1940–1941). After two years of military service in World War II, he played briefly in 1946 before retiring. At 5'9" and 160 pounds, he batted and threw right-handed.

Charles Ray Knight (born December 28, 1952) is an American former right-handed Major League Baseball corner infielder best remembered for his time with the Cincinnati Reds and New York Mets. Originally drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the tenth round of the 1970 Major League Baseball Draft, he is likely best remembered to Reds fans as the man who replaced Pete Rose at third base, whereas Mets fans remember Knight as the man who scored the winning run of game six of the 1986 World Series and the MVP of that series. Also played for the Houston Astros (1982–1984) New York Mets (1984–1986) Baltimore Orioles (1987) Detroit Tigers (1988)

Bruce Campbell (October 20, 1909 – June 17, 1995) was a professional baseball player from 1930 to 1942. Campbell began his career with the Chicago White Sox, but had very little playing time in the major leagues. In 1932, Campbell was traded from the White Sox to the St. Louis Browns, with Bump Hadley, for Red Kress. In St. Louis, Campbell was a starting outfielder, and performed well, driving in 106 runs in 1933. In the 1935 season, Campbell played with the Cleveland Indians, after being traded for multiple players and cash. In Cleveland, Campbell hit for considerably higher averages than he had in St. Louis, although injuries limited his playing time. In January 1940, the Indians traded Campbell to the Detroit Tigers for Beau Bell. The trade worked out for Campbell, as the Tigers won the American League pennant, and Campbell played all seven games of the 1940 World Series. Campbell had nine hits, four walks, scored four runs, five runs batted in and a home run in the World Series, with a batting average of .360, on-base percentage of .448 and slugging percentage of .520.

Bruce Campbell (October 20, 1909 – June 17, 1995) was a professional baseball player from 1930 to 1942. Campbell began his career with the Chicago White Sox, but had very little playing time in the major leagues. In 1932, Campbell was traded from the White Sox to the St. Louis Browns, with Bump Hadley, for Red Kress. In St. Louis, Campbell was a starting outfielder, and performed well, driving in 106 runs in 1933. In the 1935 season, Campbell played with the Cleveland Indians, after being traded for multiple players and cash. In Cleveland, Campbell hit for considerably higher averages than he had in St. Louis, although injuries limited his playing time. In January 1940, the Indians traded Campbell to the Detroit Tigers for Beau Bell. The trade worked out for Campbell, as the Tigers won the American League pennant, and Campbell played all seven games of the 1940 World Series. Campbell had nine hits, four walks, scored four runs, five runs batted in and a home run in the World Series, with a batting average of .360, on-base percentage of .448 and slugging percentage of .520.

Louis Rodman Whitaker, Jr. (born May 12, 1957 in Brooklyn, New York) nicknamed Sweet Lou, is a former Major League Baseball player. Whitaker was a second baseman for the Detroit Tigers from 1977 to 1995. Along with teammate Alan Trammell, Whitaker is perhaps best known as half of the longest running "double play" combination in major league history.

Alva Warren Cicotte (December 23, 1929 – November 29, 1982), (originally pronounced sigh-COT-ee[1] but changed to SEE-cot[2]), nicknamed "Bozo," was a Major League Baseball player. He played in five seasons in the big leagues with six teams: New York Yankees (1957); Washington Senators (1958); Detroit Tigers (1958); Cleveland Indians (1959); St. Louis Cardinals (1961); and Houston Colt .45's (1962). Born in Melvindale, Michigan, Al Cicotte pitched in 102 big league games, 16 as a starter, and compiled a record of 10-13. In 260 innings pitched, Cicotte had an earned run average of 4.36.

Herman Earl "Flea" Clifton (December 12, 1909 – December 22, 1997), was a Major League Baseball infielder who played four seasons with the Detroit Tigers from 1934 to 1937.

Pitched for the Detroit Tigers in (1989)

Clyde Jennings Manion (October 30, 1896 – September 4, 1967), nicknamed "Pete," was a Major League Baseball catcher for the Detroit Tigers (1920–27), St. Louis Browns (1928–30), and Cincinnati Reds (1932–34). He played in 477 major league games (401 as a catcher) with a career batting average of .218 and a .293 on base percentage. He had 250 hits, 112 RBIs, 96 runs scored, and 118 bases on balls. Manion was born in Big River, Missouri and died in Detroit, Michigan.

Henry Emmett Manush (July 20, 1901 – May 12, 1971), nicknamed "Heinie" due to his German heritage, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball, and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964. Manush spent 17 seasons in the majors, playing for the Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and Pittsburgh Pirates

Walter William Pierce (born April 2, 1927 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former left-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Chicago White Sox. Played for the Detroit Tigers in 1945 & 1948

Antonio Nemesio (Sanchez) Taylor (born December 19, 1935 in Central Alara, Cuba)[1] is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball. From 1958 through 1976, Taylor played for the Chicago Cubs (1958–60), Philadelphia Phillies (1960–71 and 1974–76) and Detroit Tigers (1971–73). He batted and threw right-handed.

Charlie Deal Played for the following eams Detroit Tigers (1912-1913) Boston Braves (1913-1914) St. Louis Terriers (1915) St. Louis Browns (1916) Chicago Cubs (1916-1921)

George Tucker "Tuck" Stainback (August 4, 1911 – November 29, 1992) was a Major League Baseball outfielder for 13 seasons with the Chicago Cubs (1934–1937), St. Louis Cardinals (1938), Philadelphia Phillies (1938), Brooklyn Dodgers (1938–1939), Detroit Tigers (1940–1941), New York Yankees (1942–1945), and Philadelphia Athletics (1946). Born in Los Angeles, California, Stainback played in 817 games, 629 in the outfield. For his career, he had a .259 batting average and 204 RBIs. Stainback died in 1992 after suffering a stroke in Camarillo, California, at age 81.

Frank W. Overmire (May 16, 1919 – March 3, 1977) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played ten seasons for the Detroit Tigers (1943–1949), St. Louis Browns (1950–1952), and New York Yankees (1951). In ten seasons, Overmire won 58 games and lost 67 with a 3.96 earned run average. Because of his stature, 5 feet 7 inches (1.70 m) and 170 pounds (77 kg), the left-hander was nicknamed "Stubby

He pitched in the big leagues for 16 years for four different teams Cleveland Indians (1955-1957) Los Angeles Dodgers (1968) Chicago Cubs (1969-1970). Before the 1958 season began, Aguirre was traded to the Detroit Tigers, where he remained for 10 years from 1958-1967

Albert C. Bashang, sometimes written as "Al Baschang" (August 22, 1888 – June 23, 1967) was a Major League Baseball player. Bashang appeared in six games for the Detroit Tigers in July 1912 and two games for the Brooklyn Robins in 1918. In Detroit, he played five games in left field, accompanied by Hall of Famers Ty Cobb in center field and Sam Crawford in right field.[1] He had a perfect fielding percentage for the Tigers, but his batting average was .083.

John Landis Bassler (June 3, 1895 – June 29, 1979) was a Major League Baseball catcher. Born in Mechanics Grove, Pennsylvania. Bassler played professional baseball from 1913 to 1937, including 9 seasons in the major leagues with the Cleveland Naps (1913 - 1914) and Detroit Tigers (1921 - 1927

Reno Peter Bertoia (January 8, 1935 – April 15, 2011) was an Italian-Canadian professional baseball player, playing infield for the Detroit Tigers (1953–58 and 1961–62), Washington Senators/Minnesota Twins (1959–61) and Kansas City Athletics (1961)

William Clifton Bolton (April 10, 1907 – April 21, 1979) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Washington Senators and Detroit Tigers. He was born in High Point, North Carolina. Washington Senators (1931, 1933-36, 1941) Detroit Tigers (1937)

He played with the Washington Senators, Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, and New York Yankees during his fifteen year playing career. Ed Brinkman led the American League in games played twice, won a Gold Glove Award at shortstop, and had a career batting average of .224.

Frederick Behlmer Carisch (November 14, 1881 – April 19, 1977) was a Major League Baseball catcher who played for eight seasons. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1903 to 1906, the Cleveland Naps from 1912 to 1914, and the Detroit Tigers in 1923.

Wilmer Dean Chance (born June 1, 1941 in Wooster, Ohio) is a former American Major League Baseball pitcher.[1] Over the right hander's 11-year major league career, he would play for the Los Angeles Angels, Minnesota Twins, Cleveland Indians, New York Mets, and Detroit Tigers. With a touch of wildness and the habit of never looking at home plate once he received the sign from his catcher, Chance would turn his back fully towards the hitter in mid-windup before spinning and unleashing a good fastball, sinker, or sidearm curveball.

Played 3 seasons for the Detroit Tigers from (1960–1963)

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1955).

Played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1929–1935) Boston Red Sox (1936–1940) Washington Senators(1941)and Detroit Tigers (1942–1948)

Roy Joseph Cullenbine (October 18, 1913 – May 28, 1991) was a Major League Baseball outfielder and first baseman. He played ten years in the Major Leagues for six teams: Detroit Tigers (1938–1939 and 1945–1947), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940), St. Louis Browns (1940–1942), Washington Senators (1942), New York Yankees (1942) and Cleveland Indians (1943–1945) during his ten-year playing career.

George William Cutshaw (July 29, 1887 in Wilmington, Illinois – August 22, 1973 in San Diego, California), is a former professional baseball player who played second base in the Major Leagues from 1912 to 1923. He would play for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Detroit Tigers(1922–1923). He played in the 1916 World Series for Brooklyn.

Played short stop for the Detroit Tigers (1927)

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1984–1988)

August 14, 1954 – April 13, 2009), nicknamed "The Bird", was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched his entire career for the Detroit Tigers (1976–1980). In 1976, Fidrych led the major leagues with a 2.34 ERA, won the AL Rookie of the Year award, and finished with a 19-9 record.

He was originally signed by the St. Louis Browns, in 1952. His major league career lasted 15 seasons, from 1956 to 1970. He played for the Baltimore Orioles (1956–1957), Chicago White Sox (1958), Detroit Tigers (1958), Cleveland Indians (1959–1964), St. Louis Cardinals (1965–1966), Philadelphia Phillies (1967), Atlanta Braves (1967–1969), Oakland Athletics (1969–1970) and Milwaukee Brewers (1970). Francona batted and threw left-handed.

Ned Franklin Garver (born December 25, 1925) was an American League pitcher playing from 1948 to 1961 winning 129 games in his major league career. Played for the Detroit Tigers from 1952 to 1956.

May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993), nicknamed “The Mechanical Man,” was a German-American Major League Baseball second baseman who played 19 seasons (1924–42) for the Detroit Tigers.[1] He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1949.

Was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1962 through 1963 for the Detroit Tigers.

Marvin Edward Grissom (March 31, 1918 – September 18, 2005) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York & San Francisco Giants (1946 and 1953–58), Detroit Tigers (1949), Chicago White Sox (1952), Boston Red Sox (1953) and St. Louis Cardinals (1959).[1] He was born in Los Molinos, California

Fred Girard Haney (April 25, 1896 – November 9, 1977) was an American third baseman, manager, coach and executive in Major League Baseball. As a manager, he won two pennants and a world championship with the Milwaukee Braves and, as an executive, he was the first general manager of the expansion Los Angeles Angels of the American League. Indeed, for years Haney was one of the most popular baseball figures in Los Angeles. In 1974 he was presented with the King of Baseball award given by Minor League Baseball. Born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and raised in Los Angeles, Haney's major league playing career lasted all or part of seven seasons (1922–27, 1929). Primarily a third baseman — despite his diminutive (5 feet, 6 inches/1.67 m) size — Haney compiled a .275 batting average for the Detroit Tigers(1922 – 1925) and Boston Red Sox, plus brief appearances with the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals. Much of his playing career was spent in his hometown with the city's two Pacific Coast League clubs, the original, PCL Angels and the Hollywood Stars. He threw and batted right-handed.

Raymond Hall Hayworth (January 29, 1904 – September 25, 2002) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1926 through 1945, Hayworth played for the Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants and St. Louis Browns. He batted and threw right-handed.

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1937)

Floyd Caves "Babe" Herman (June 26, 1903 – November 27, 1987) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who was best known for his several seasons with the Brooklyn Robins (later the Brooklyn Dodgers, now the Los Angeles Dodgers). He played briefly for the Tigers in 1937, hitting .300 in 17 games, and then returned to the minor leagues.

Played for the Detroit Tigers in (1952).

Earl Douglas Johnson (April 2, 1919 – December 3, 1994) was an American professional baseball player and scout and a decorated World War II veteran. He was a left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox and the Detroit Tigers. Johnson, who was nicknamed the "smiling Swedish southpaw".Boston Red Sox (1940-1941, 1946-1950)and the Detroit Tigers (1951)

David Jefferson "Davy" Jones (June 30, 1880 – March 30, 1972), nicknamed "Kangaroo",[1] was an outfielder in Major League Baseball. He played fifteen seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, St. Louis Browns, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, and Pittsburgh Rebel Jones spent much of his career playing outfield with the Detroit Tigers, alongside Hall of Fame outfielders, Ty Cobb and Wahoo Sam Crawford. With Cobb and Crawford solidly entrenched in the outfield, Jones was forced to battle for the 3rd outfield spot with Matty McIntyre each year from 1906 to 1910.

He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of two seasons (1924, 1930) with the Detroit Tigers and Boston Braves.

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1947–52). Kell was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983.

Charles Ernest "Charlie" Keller (September 12, 1916 – May 23, 1990) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1939 through 1952, Keller played for the New York Yankees (1939–43, 1945–49, 1952) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). A native of Middletown, Maryland, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

John Francis Kerr (November 26, 1898 – October 19, 1993) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball between 1923 and 1934 with the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, and the Washington Senators in the American League, primarily as a second baseman

Teams Chicago Cubs (1950-1954) Cincinnati Redlegs/Reds (1955-1958, 1962) Los Angeles Dodgers (1958-1959) Cleveland Indians (1960) Washington Senators (1961) Philadelphia Phillies (1963-1964) Minnesota Twins (1964-1966) Detroit Tigers (1967)

Donald Martin Kolloway (August 4, 1918 in Posen, Illinois – June 30, 1994 in Blue Island, Illinois), was a Major League Baseball player who played 12 years as an infielder for the Chicago White Sox (1940–1943, 1946–1949), Detroit Tigers (1949–1952), and Philadelphia Athletics (1953)

Played shortstop and the outfield for the Detroit Tigers (1952–1959)

Charles Ten Eyck "Chick" Lathers (October 22, 1888 – July 26, 1971) was an American baseball player. With a .383 batting average, he was the third baseman and the leading hitter on the 1909 Michigan Wolverines baseball team that finished with a record of 18–3–1. He later played two years of Major League Baseball as an inifelder for the Detroit Tigers. After retiring from baseball in 1913, Lathers worked for the Ford Motor Company for several years, served in the U.S. Army during World War I, and operated a dairy farm in northern Michigan from 1925 to 1962. He was also active in local government in northern Michigan

William Henry Lawrence was a professional baseball player. He played part of one season in Major League Baseball with the Detroit Tigers in 1932, primarily as an outfielder. Lawrence also had an extensive minor league baseball career, playing fifteen seasons from 1929 until 1943. In all but two of those seasons, he spent at least part of the season playing in Seattle for the Indians and, later, the Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League.

Ralph Overton "Razor" Ledbetter (December 8, 1894 – February 1, 1969) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who pitched one inning for the Detroit Tigers in April 1915. He also played 11 years in minor league baseball from 1913 to 1926.

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1974–1979)

Hubert Benjamin "Dutch" Leonard, (April 16, 1892 – July 11, 1952) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who had an 11-year career from 1913 to 1921, and 1924 to 1925. He played for the Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers, and holds the major league modern-era record for the lowest single-season ERA of all time — 0.96 in 1914. The all-time record holder is Tim Keefe with a 0.86 ERA in 1880. Another pitcher called Dutch Leonard pitched in the National League around a decade later

Fredric Michael "Fred" Lynn (born February 3, 1952) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1974–1980), California Angels (1981–1984), Baltimore Orioles (1985–1988), Detroit Tigers (1988–1989) and San Diego Padres (1990). He is best known for being the first player to win the Rookie of the Year award and MVP in the same season. Lynn was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002 and to the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

Japhet Monroe "Red" Lynn (December 27, 1913 in Kenney, Texas - October 27, 1977 in Bellville, Texas), was a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1939-1944. He would play for the Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, and New York Giants. Lynn served in the military during World War II.

Charles Kennon "Buck" Marrow (August 29, 1909 in Tarboro, North Carolina – November 21, 1982), was a professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues in 1932 and 1937-1938. He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Detroit Tigers

Charles Richard Maxwell (born April 8, 1927), nicknamed "Smokey," "Paw Paw," (or "Ol' Paw Paw"), "Sunday Punch" and "Sunday Charlie," is a former professional baseball outfielder. He played 15 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Boston Red Sox (1950–54), Baltimore Orioles (1955), Detroit Tigers (1955–62), and Chicago White Sox (1962–64).

Lewis William "Sport" McAllister (July 23, 1874 – July 17, 1962) was a professional baseball player. He played seven seasons in Major League Baseball with the Cleveland Spiders (1896–1899), Detroit Tigers (1901–1903), and Baltimore Orioles (1902). He was a versatile switch hitter who played every position during his major league career. He played 147 games in the outfield, 83 at catcher, 65 at first base, 62 at shortstop, 27 at third base, and 7 at second base. He also pitched in 17 games, including 10 complete games.

Detroit Tigers 1939–1941 nicknamed "Happy," was a left-handed pitcher

William Mitchell (December 1, 1889 – November 23, 1973) born in Pleasant Grove, Mississippi, was a pitcher for the Cleveland Naps/Indians (1909-1916) and Detroit Tigers (1916-1919). In 11 seasons, he had an 84–92 record in 276 games pitched with 93 complete games, 16 shutouts, 4 saves, 1632 innings pitched, 605 walks allowed, 921 strikeouts, 75 hit batsmen, 48 wild pitches and a 2.88 ERA. He died in Sardis, Mississippi, at the age of 83.

William Charles (Bill) Monbouquette (born August 11, 1936 in Medford, Massachusetts) is an American former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played for the Boston Red Sox (1958–1965), Detroit Tigers (1966–1967), New York Yankees (1967–1968), and the San Francisco Giants (1968).

nicknamed "Chick," was a Major League Baseball player for the Detroit Tigers in 1935 (14 games) and 1938 center field.

nicknamed "Chick," was a Major League Baseball player for the Detroit Tigers in 1935 (14 games) and 1938 center field.

Gerald Braheen Moses (born August 9, 1946 in Yazoo City, Mississippi) is a retired American professional baseball player. A catcher, he signed a bonus contract with the Boston Red Sox in 1964 and spent his early Major League Baseball career with the Bosox, but over the course of his nine years in MLB Moses would play for seven different teams never spending more than one full season with the Angels, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees, Detroit Tigers, San Diego Padres and Chicago White Sox. He did serve as Detroit's regular catcher in 1974.

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1959–1963)

Patrick Joseph "Pat" Mullin (November 1, 1917 – August 14, 1999), was a Major League Baseball outfielder for the Detroit Tigers from 1940 to 1941 and 1946-1953. Born in Trotter, Pennsylvania, Mullin was signed by the Tigers before the 1937 season as a 19-year-old amateur free agent. A left-handed hitter who threw right-handed, Mullin was 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) and 190 pounds

Fred Nicholson (September 1, 1894 in Honey Grove, Texas – January 23, 1972 in Kilgore, Texas), was a Major League Baseball player who played outfielder from 1912-1922. He would play for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Braves, and Detroit Tigers.

Fred Nicholson (September 1, 1894 in Honey Grove, Texas – January 23, 1972 in Kilgore, Texas), was a Major League Baseball player who played outfielder from 1912-1922. He would play for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Braves, and Detroit Tigers.

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1970–1972)

0liver Edward O'Mara was born on March 8, 1891 in Saint Louis, Missouri. He died on October 24, 1989 in Reno, Nevada. He was a shortstop in Major League Baseball from 1912 to 1919,Detroit Tigers and primarily with the Brooklyn Robins. He had one at-bat in the 1916 World Series against the Boston Red Sox. At the time of his death, Ollie O'Mara was the oldest living professional baseball player

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1974–1977)

Played for the Detroit Tigers from 1943 thru 1949.

Played for the following teams Detroit Tigers (1955, 1963–1964) Chicago White Sox (1956–1959) Cleveland Indians (1960–1962)

Anthony Francis Piet (December 7, 1906 in Berwick, Pennsylvania – December 1, 1981 in Hinsdale, Illinois) was an infielder in Major League Baseball from 1931 to 1938. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, and Detroit Tigers(1938)

Played for the following teams Brooklyn LosAngeles Dodgers (1953–1966) Detroit Tigers (1966–1967) San Diego Padres (1969)

Paul Rapier Richards (November 21, 1908 — May 4, 1986) was an American professional baseball player, manager, scout and executive in Major League Baseball.[1][2] During his playing career, he was a catcher and right-handed batter with the Brooklyn Dodgers (1932), New York Giants (1933–35), Philadelphia Athletics (1935) and Detroit Tigers (1943–46).[1] After retiring, he became the manager of the Chicago White Sox (1951–54, 1976) and Baltimore Orioles (1955–61).[2] He also served as the General Manager for the Orioles, the Houston Colt .45s and the Atlanta Braves.

Saul Walter Rogovin (October 10, 1923, in Brooklyn, New York – January 23, 1995, in New York City) was a professional baseball player. Rogovin was a pitcher over parts of 8 seasons (1949–57), with the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, and Philadelphia Phillies. For his major league career, he compiled a 48–48 record in 150 appearances, with a 4.06 ERA, 10 shutouts, and 388 strikeouts.

Truett Banks "Rip" Sewell (May 11, 1907 – September 3, 1989) was a right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played 13 years in the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers (1932) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1938–1949). Sewell was selected four times to the National League All Star team (1943–1946) and is credited with inventing the "Eephus pitch."

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1957–1958)

Played for the Detroit Tigers (2007–2008)

Ronald Lee Shoop (September 19, 1931 – March 14, 2003) was a professional baseball player. He was a catcher for one season (1959) with the Detroit Tigers. For his career, he compiled a .143 batting average in seven at-bats, with one run batted in. He was born and later died in Rural Valley, Pennsylvania at the age of 71

Victor Garland Sorrell (April 9, 1901 – May 4, 1972), nicknamed "Lawyer" and "The Philosopher," was a Major League pitcher who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers. In 10 Major League seasons, Sorrell had a 92–101 record with a 4.43 career ERA. Sorrell also coached the North Carolina State University baseball team from 1946 to 1966.

William John Steen (November 11, 1887 – March 13, 1979) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played four years with the Cleveland Indians (1912–1915) and Detroit Tigers (1915).

(born July 3, 1953, in Detroit, Michigan) Played for the Detroit Tigers (1985–1992)

George Robert "Birdie" Tebbetts (November 10, 1912 – March 24, 1999) was an American professional baseball player, manager, scout and front office executive.[1][2] He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a catcher for the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians from 1936 to 1952. Tebbets was regarded as the best catcher in the American League in the late 1940s.

Luther Baxter "Bud" Thomas (September 9, 1910 – May 5, 2001), was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played in 1932 and 1933 and from 1937 to 1941 with the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Athletics, and the Detroit Tigers. He batted and threw right-handed. Thomas had a 25-34 record in 143 career games. He was born in Faber, Virginia and died in North Garden, Virginia. On April 23, 1939, Bud Thomas surrendered the first major League home run ever hit by Red Sox legend Ted Williams.

Gus Triandos (born July 30, 1930, in San Francisco, California) is a Greek-American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball mostly as a catcher but also played as a first baseman for the New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles and the Detroit Tigers (1963) of the American League and the Philadelphia Phillies and Houston Astros of the National League.[1] He batted and threw right-handed.

Paul Howard "Dizzy" Trout (June 29, 1915 – February 28, 1972) was a Major League Baseball pitcher primarily for the Detroit Tigers. Born in Sandcut, Indiana, he first played professionally in 1935 with the Terre Haute Tots in the Three-I League before signing with Detroit in 1939. Trout played for the Tigers for fourteen seasons, accompanying the team to two World Series, in 1940 and 1945

Trucks played for the Detroit Tigers (1941–1943, 1945–1952, 1956)

Jacob Fields (Jake) Wade (April 1, 1912 – February 1, 2006) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1936–1938), Boston Red Sox (1939[start]), St. Louis Browns (1939[end]), Chicago White Sox, (1942–1944), New York Yankees (1946) and Washington Senators (1946). Wade batted and threw left-handed. He was nicknamed "Whistlin' Jake"

Richard Henry Weik (November 17, 1927 – April 21, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. A 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m), 184 lb (83 kg) right-hander, he played for the Washington Senators (1948–1950), Cleveland Indians (1950), and Detroit Tigers (1953–1954).

Detroit Tigers (1912) Charles D. Wheatley (June 27, 1893 in Rosedale, Kansas – December 10, 1892 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) was a right-handed starting pitcher who played for the Detroit Tigers in 1912.

Earl Oliver Whitehill (February 7, 1899 – October 22, 1954) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Detroit Tigers for the most significant portion of his career (1923–1932), and later with the Washington Senators (1933–1936), Cleveland Indians (1937–1938), and the Chicago Cubs (1939). Consistently winning in double digits for thirteen years (1924–1936), left-handed Whitehill went on to become one of the Top 100 winning pitchers of all time. He was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

John Whitlow Wyatt (September 27, 1907 – July 16 - 1999) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1929–1933), Chicago White Sox (1933–1936), Cleveland Indians (1937), Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–1944), and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). He is most famous for his performance in 1941, when his team (the Dodgers) won the National League pennant.

Gus Edward Zernial (June 27, 1923 – January 20, 2011)[1] was a Major League Baseball left-fielder and right-handed batter who played for the Chicago White Sox (1949–51), Philadelphia Athletics (1951–54), Kansas City Athletics (1955–57) and Detroit Tigers (1958–59). He was billed as the "New Joe DiMaggio.

Howard Earl Averill (May 21, 1902 – August 16, 1983) was an American player in Major League Baseball who was a center fielder from 1929 to 1941. He was a six-time All-Star (1933–38) and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975. Teams-Cleveland Indians (1929–1939),Detroit Tigers (1939–1940)&Boston Braves (1941)

He was signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1926. Ferrell made his major league debut with the Browns on April 19, 1929 TO 1933,Boston Red Sox (1933–1937) Washington Senators (1937–1941) St. Louis Browns (1941–1943) Washington Senators (1944–1945, 1947)Ferrell continued as a coach for the Senators in 1948 and 1949, returning to his original team, the Detroit Tigers, to coach from 1950 to 1954 before retiring from the field altogether.[4][27] Afterwards, he served as a scout then as the scouting director for the Tigers before becoming the general manager and vice president in 1959.[4][28] During his tenure as a Tigers executive, the team won two World Series in 1968 and in 1984 and won two American League Eastern Division titles in 1972 and in 1987.[4] In 1984, Ferrell was elected along with Pee Wee Reese to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.[3][29] He retired in 1992 at the age of 87 after 42 years with the Tigers organization.[4] Ferrell died in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan in 1995.[30]

He pitched for 1959-1975 for four different teams (Detroit Tigers in 1973 one seaxon. During a 17-year baseball career, Perry compiled 215 wins, 1,576 strikeouts, and a 3.45 earned run average.

He played in (MLB) as a catcher for the Detroit Tigers from (1936–1942, 1946–1947). Boston Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians from 1936 to 1952. Tebbets was regarded as the best catcher in the American League in the late 1940s.His major league career encompassed 14 years as a catcher, 11 as a manager and 28 as a scout.

Born in Houston, Texas, Schuble played seven seasons as a utility infielder in the Major Leagues, starting his career with the St. Louis Cardinals on July 8, 1927 and finishing with the Cardinals on May 15, 1936. In between, he played five seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1929, 1932–1935), including the 1934 and 1935 American League pennant winners. Schuble played a total of 332 major league games, including 172 at shortstop, 106 at 3rd base, and three at 2nd base.

Alan Stuart Trammell (born February 21, 1958) is a retired American baseball shortstop of the Detroit Tigers from 1977 to 1996. Trammell, nicknamed "Tram", played his entire career with the Tigers, highlighted by a World Series championship in 1984 and an American League East division championship in 1987. Although his arm was not overpowering, he had a quick release and made accurate throws, ultimately winnings four Gold Glove awards. Trammell's defense perfectly complemented his double-play partner, Lou Whitaker. The two formed the longest continuous double-play combination in major league history, playing 19 seasons together. At the plate, Trammell was one of the best-hitting shortstops of his era and won three Silver Slugger awards. Trammell later served as Detroit's manager from 2003 through 2005. He is currently the bench coach for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

George Zuverink (born August 20, 1924 in Holland, Michigan) is a former professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of eight seasons (1951-1952, 1954-1959) with the Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles. For his career, he compiled a 32–36 record in 265 appearances, mostly as a relief pitcher, with a 3.54 earned run average and 223 strikeouts.

Walter Arthur "Hoot" Evers (February 8, 1921 – January 25, 1991) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played twelve seasons in the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers (1941, 1946-1952, 1954), Boston Red Sox (1952-1954), New York Giants (1954), Baltimore Orioles (1954, 1956), and Cleveland Indians (1955-1956).

Matthew Daniel Batts (born: October 16, 1921 in San Antonio, Texas) was a Major League Baseball catcher who played from 1947 through 1956 for the Boston Red Sox (1947–1951), St. Louis Browns (1951), Detroit Tigers (1952–1954), Chicago White Sox (1954) and Cincinnati Reds (1955–1956). Batts batted and threw right-handed.

Raymond Ernest Herbert (born December 15, 1929, in Detroit, Michigan) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played fourteen seasons with the Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Athletics, Chicago White Sox, and Philadelphia Phillies. He won 20 games with the White Sox in 1962 and was selected to play in the All-Star game. The following season, he led the American League in shutouts thrown (7). In 407 career games, Herbert had a won-loss record of 104-107 with 68 complete games and 13 shutouts.

As a baseball player, the 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m), 185 lb (84 kg) Brady was signed off his college campus as an undergraduate by the Detroit Tigers as a $37,500 "bonus baby" in 1955. Detroit's farm system director, John McHale, was a Notre Dame alumnus and Brady promised his father he would return to college to complete his education when he signed his contract.[3] Under the terms of the bonus rule then in effect, however, Brady was forced to spend the first two years of his pro career on a Major League roster.

James Paul David "Jim" Bunning (born October 23, 1931) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher and politician. During a 17-year baseball career, he pitched from 1955 to 1971, most notably with the Detroit Tigers and the Philadelphia Phillies. In 1959, the right-hander struck out the side throwing just nine pitches as a reliever in the top of the ninth inning of Detroit's 5-4 loss to Boston at Briggs Stadium. Sammy White, Jim Mahoney and Ike Delock were the victims of his immaculate inning. When he retired, he had the second-highest total of career strikeouts in Major League history; he is currently 17th. Bunning pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 21, 1964, against the New York Mets. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996.

Paul Eugene Foytack (born November 16, 1930 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher from 1953 to 1964. During his eleven year career, he played with the Detroit Tigers and Los Angeles Angels, posting a record of 86-87 with a 4.14 ERA. He was a regular, and effective, starter for the Tigers for four solid years, 1956 through 1959, during which he was among the top ten pitchers in the American League in fewest hits allowed per nine innings three times, and also top ten in innings pitched (three times), strike-outs (three times), complete games (twice), and fewest walks per nine innings (once). In 1959, he led the American League in games started in with 37. His production dropped off in the 1960s, and on June 15, 1963 he was traded by the Detroit Tigers with Frank Kostro to the Los Angeles Angels for George Thomas and cash.

Detroit Tigers (1952–1959) Hoeft was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1950. He made his major league debut on April 18, 1952 for the Tigers, and went on to pitch seven full seasons in Detroit.

Robert James "Red" Wilson (born March 7, 1929) was a college football player and Major League Baseball catcher who played 10 seasons in the Major Leagues for the Chicago White Sox (1951–1954), Detroit Tigers (1954–1960), and Cleveland Indians (1960).

John Thomas Groth (born July 23, 1926) is a former professional baseball player who played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1946 to 1960. He was born in Chicago, Illinois. He play for the Detroit Tigers (1946–1952, 1957–1960), St. Louis Browns (1953), Chicago White Sox (1954–1955), Washington Senators (1955), and Kansas City Athletics (1956–1957).

Boyd Gail Harris (born October 15, 1931 in Abingdon, Virginia) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman who played with the New York Giants and Detroit Tigers from 1955 to 1960. In 1958, Harris hit a career high 20 home runs with the Tigers.

Louis Peter Skizas (born June 2, 1932 in Chicago, Illinois), is a former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball primarily as an outfielder and third baseman from 1956-1959. Played for the Detroit Tigers (1958)

Louis Mortimer Sleater (born September 8, 1926 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played from 1950 to 1952 and from 1955 to 1958 for the St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Kansas City Athletics, Milwaukee Braves, Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles. He was 5’10” and he weighed 185 pounds. He attended the University of Maryland.

Vito John Valentinetti (born September 16, 1928 in West New York, New Jersey) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for five seasons. A graduate of Iona College, he played for the Chicago White Sox in 1954, the Chicago Cubs from 1956 to 1957, the Cleveland Indians in 1957, the Detroit Tigers in 1958, and the Washington Senators in 1959.

Charles Lemoine Thompson (born March 1, 1924 in Coalport, Pennsylvania) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. He played from 1954 to 1958 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Kansas City Athletics and Detroit Tigers 1958. He was a coach for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1981

Edward Frederick Joseph "Eddie" Yost (October 13, 1926 – October 16, 2012[1]) was a professional baseball player and coach.[2] He played the majority of his Major League Baseball career as a third baseman for the Washington Senators, then played 2 seasons each with the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels before retiring in 1962.[2] Yost batted and threw right-handed.[2] He was nicknamed the "Walking Man" for the numerous bases on balls he drew.[3][4] Yost was considered one of the best lead off men and third basemen of his era.

Orville Inman "Coot" Veal (born on July 9, 1932 in Sandersville, Georgia) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers before the 1952 season, and later drafted by the Washington Senators from the Tigers in the 1960 American League expansion draft (December 14, 1960). He played for the Tigers (1958-1960, 1963), Senators (1961), and Pittsburgh Pirates (1962).

Robert James Bruce (born May 16, 1933 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball Detroit Tigers (1959–1961)Houston Colt .45s/Astros (1962-1966)and the Atlanta Braves (1967)

a first baseman and outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1952–59), Chicago Cubs (1960), Detroit Tigers (1960–61), Cincinnati Reds (1961) and Houston Colt .45's (1962). He threw and batted right-handed. His uncle, Dom Dallessandro, also was a major leaguer.

Terrence Edward Fox (born July 31, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former right-handed Major League Baseball relief pitcher/closer who played seven seasons from 1960 to 1966. He played for the Milwaukee Braves, Detroit Tigers(1961–1966) and Philadelphia Phillies

John Frederick Hiller (born April 8, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a former left-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Detroit Tigers. After suffering a heart attack in 1971, he returned to the team and recorded 38 saves in 1973 – a major league record until 1983, and a team record until 2000. He also set an American League record by winning 17 games in relief in 1974. His 125 career saves ranked fourth in AL history and were the seventh most among all left-handers when he retired, and stood as a team record until 1993. His 545 career games pitched ranked ninth among AL left-handers at the end of his career, and remain the franchise record.

William James "Gates" Brown (born in Crestline, Ohio on May 2, 1939) is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the Detroit Tigers (1963–1975). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. In a 13 season career, Brown was a .257 hitter with 84 home runs and 322 runs batted in in 1051 games played

Patrick Edward Dobson, Jr. (February 12, 1942 – November 22, 2006) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1967–69), San Diego Padres (1970), Baltimore Orioles (1971–72), Atlanta Braves (1973), New York Yankees (1973–75) and Cleveland Indians (1976–77). He was best known for being one of four Orioles pitchers to win 20 games in their 1971 season.

James Thomas Northrup (November 24, 1939 – June 8, 2011[1]), nicknamed the “Silver Fox” due to his prematurely graying hair, was a Major League Baseball outfielder and left-handed batter who played for the Detroit Tigers (1964–1974), Montreal Expos (1974) and Baltimore Orioles (1974–75).[

Clarence Lemuel "Red" Phillips (November 3, 1908 – September 23, 1988) was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of two seasons (1934, 1936) with the Detroit Tigers. For his career, he compiled a 4-4 record, with a 6.42 earned run average, and 18 strikeouts in 110? innings pitched. An alumnus of East Central University, he was born in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma and died in Wichita, Kansas at the age of 79.

John Scott "Jack" Morris (born May 16, 1955) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher. He played in 18 big league seasons between 1977 and 1994, mainly for the Detroit Tigers, and won 254 games throughout his career. Armed with a fastball, slider, devastating forkball[1][2] and a fierce competitive spirit, Morris was a five-time All-Star (1981, 1984, 1985, 1987, and 1991), and played on four World Championship teams (1984 Tigers, 1991 Twins, and 1992–1993 Blue Jays). While he gave up the most hits, earned runs and home runs of any pitcher in the 1980s,[3] he also started the most games, pitched the most innings and had the most wins of any pitcher in that decade.

Before the 1976 season, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers with pitcher Bill Laxton for pitcher Mickey Lolich and outfielder Billy Baldwin.[1] In his three plus seasons with the Tigers, Staub hit .277 with 70 home runs.[11] He was voted to start the 1976 All-Star Game, where he went 2-for-2. In 1978, Staub became the first player to play in all 162 regular-season games exclusively as a designated hitter.[12] Not playing the field at all proved beneficial, as Staub finished second in the Major Leagues with 121 RBI and finished fifth in American League Most Valuable Player voting. He was selected to the Sporting News American League All-Star team at the end of the season as the designated hitter.[13] Staub held out to start the 1979 season,[6] and eventually he was dealt to the Montreal Expos in July of that same season.[

is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1979–83) and Kansas City Royals (1984–86). He batted and threw right-handed. Over eight major league seasons, Jones was a .252 hitter with seven home runs and 91 RBI in 527 games

Thomas Dale Brookens (born August 10, 1953, in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1979–1988), New York Yankees (1989), and Cleveland Indians (1990). Brookens is currently the first base coach for the Tigers.

Jeffrey Mark Robinson (born December 14, 1961 in Ventura, California), is a former professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1987 to 1992. Robinson pitched for the Baltimore Orioles, Pittsburgh Pirates, Texas Rangers, and Detroit Tigers.

George Clyde Kell (August 23, 1922 – March 24, 2009[1]) was an American baseball third baseman who played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1943–46), Detroit Tigers (1947–52), Boston Red Sox (1952–54), Chicago White Sox (1954–56), and Baltimore Orioles (1956–57) in the American League, who went on to become a baseball broadcaster for 40 years. Kell was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983

George Lee "Sparky" Anderson (February 22, 1934 – November 4, 2010) was a Major League Baseball manager. He managed the National League's Cincinnati Reds to the 1975 and 1976 championships, then added a third title in 1984 with the Detroit Tigers of the American League Detroit Tigers (1979–1995). He was the first manager to win the World Series in both leagues. His 2,194 career wins are the sixth most for a manager in Major League history. He was named American League Manager of the Year in 1984 and 1987. Anderson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1990–1996)

Alan Stuart Trammell (born February 21, 1958) is a retired American baseball shortstop of the Detroit Tigers from 1977 to 1996. Trammell, nicknamed "Tram", played his entire career with the Tigers, highlighted by a World Series championship in 1984 and an American League East division championship in 1987

José Desiderio Rodriguez Lima (September 30, 1972 – May 23, 2010) was a Dominican right-handed pitcher who spent thirteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Detroit Tigers (1994–1996, 2001–2002), Houston Astros (1997–2001), Kansas City Royals (2003, 2005), Los Angeles Dodgers (2004) and New York Mets (2006). His best year in the majors was 1999, when he won 21 games for the Astros and pitched in his only All-Star Game

José Desiderio Rodriguez Lima (September 30, 1972 – May 23, 2010) was a Dominican right-handed pitcher who spent thirteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Detroit Tigers (1994–1996, 2001–2002), Houston Astros (1997–2001), Kansas City Royals (2003, 2005), Los Angeles Dodgers (2004) and New York Mets (2006). His best year in the majors was 1999, when he won 21 games for the Astros and pitched in his only All-Star Game

a retired second baseman who spent sixteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Philadelphia Phillies (1983–1989), New York Mets (1989), Los Angeles Dodgers (1990–1992), Kansas City Royals (1992, 1995), Cincinnati Reds (1993), Detroit Tigers (1994–1995) and Toronto Blue Jays (1996–1998).

Played for the Detroit Tigers (1990–1997) and the Cleveland Indians (1998–2002) third base

Chad Curtis (born November 6, 1968 in Marion, Indiana) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1992–2001, notably for the New York Yankees. He also played for the California Angels (his original team), Detroit Tigers, Los Angeles Dodgers, Cleveland Indians and Texas Rangers

Orlando Miller Salmon (born January 13, 1969 in Changuinola, Panamá), is a former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball primarily as a shortstop from 1994–97. Orlando Miller got his pro career started in the minor leagues in 1991. Miller saw playing time with both the Jackson Generals of the class double "A" Texas League and with the Osceola Astros of the class "A" Florida State League in 1991. Miller returned to Jackson in 1992, moving up to triple "A" with the Tucson Toros of the Pacific Coast League later in the season. Miller played for the Toros once again in 1993 before his big break into the major leagues with the Houston Astros in 1994. He played for the Astros for two more seasons, then finished his MLB career with the Detroit Tigers in 1997.

Anthony Christopher Clark, known as Tony (born June 15, 1972, in Newton, Kansas), is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and current MLB Network studio analyst. Clark played for the Detroit Tigers (1995–2001), Boston Red Sox (2002), New York Mets (2003), New York Yankees (2004), Arizona Diamondbacks (2005–2007), San Diego Padres (2008), and again with the Diamondbacks starting in July 2008 until his release in July 2009. He was a switch hitter, and threw right-handed. He was third in Rookie of the Year voting in 1996, and was an All Star in 2001.

Charles Brandon Inge ( /'?nd?/ inj; born May 19, 1977) is a Major League Baseball third baseman for the Oakland Athletics. Inge also played 12 seasons with the Detroit Tigers. He bats and throws right-handed

In 2000, Garner was hired to manage the Tigers, in their inaugural season at Comerica Park. The Tigers were in contention for the American League Wild Card berth for much of the season, but faded and finished 79-83. Garner didn't manage a winning season in his years in Detroit, and when his 2002 team began the season 0-6, he and general manager Randy Smith were fired.

Wendell Errol Magee Jr. (August 3, 1972 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi), is a retired Major League Baseball player who played outfielder from 1996-2002 for the Philadelphia Phillies and Detroit Tigers. Wendell also played for the Long Island Ducks of the Atlantic League in 2004-2005

Sean Thomas Casey (born July 2, 1974[1]), nicknamed "The Mayor," is a former Major League Baseball first baseman for the Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, Detroit Tigers, and Boston Red Sox. He is currently a broadcaster for Major League Baseball.

Alexander Thomas Avila (born January 29, 1987) is an American professional baseball catcher with the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball. He is 5' 11" tall and weighs 210 pounds. Avila was born in Hialeah, Florida TILL PRESENT

Jacob Edward Turner (born May 21, 1991)Turner was drafted ninth overall in the 2009 Major League Baseball Draft by the Detroit Tigers.[5] Turner signed a major league contract with the Tigers for a guaranteed $5.5M, with the potential to reach $7M.[6] Turner is represented by sports agent Scott Boras. He was placed on the Detroit Tigers 40-man roster in November 2009.On July 23, 2012, Jacob Turner, Rob Brantly, and Brian Flynn, were traded to the Miami Marlins for Aníbal Sánchez and Omar Infante.[

Porcello was signed by the Tigers to a $7.28 million,[6] four-year deal with two one-year options. The total contract is worth $11.1 million, making Porcello the highest-paid high schooler ever.[7] He also received a $3.5 million signing bonus, the second-largest ever given out by the Tigers, surpassed only by the $3.55 million[8] given to 2006 first round pick Andrew Miller. 2009 T0 PRESENT.

Scott Daniel Sizemore (born January 4, 1985) is an American professional baseball infielder with the Oakland Athletics of Major League Baseball. Started his big league career with the Detroit Tigers.

Carlos Alfonso Guillén (born September 30, 1975 in Maracay, Aragua State, Venezuela) is a retired Venezuelan professional baseball infielder.[1]. Guillén was signed by the Houston Astros as a non-draft amateur free agent in 1992. He was traded to the Seattle Mariners with pitcher Freddy García and John Halama in the deal that sent Randy Johnson to the Astros. Guillén made his debut in 1998 and was traded to Detroit at the end of the 2003 season. He retired after the 2011 season.

Joel Martin Zumaya (born November 9, 1984) is an American professional baseball pitcher who is currently a free agent. He is known for his record-breaking fastballs and his numerous injuries. With the Tigers, he has most often been used as a middle relief pitcher and occasionally as a setup man, filling the innings after the starter has finished and before the closer has come in. Zumaya is a fan favorite for his intense, aggressive attitude on the mound and his 100 MPH fastball, which has topped out at 104.8 MPH. This was the fastest pitch ever recorded at that time

Phillip "Phil" Douglas Coke (born July 19, 1982) is an American professional baseball left-handed pitcher with the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball. Coke was born in Sonora, California

Ryan Keith Perry (born February 13, 1987) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball. At the end of 2008 Baseball America named him the Detroit Tigers second best prospect, behind Rick Porcello.Perry was traded by the Tigers to the Washington Nationals for Collin Balester on December 9, 2011