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Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Preston Rudolph York (August 17, 1913 – February 5, 1970) was an American baseball player, coach, scout, and manager. York played professional baseball, primarily as a first baseman but also as a catcher, for 18 years from 1933 to 1951, including all or part of 13 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Detroit Tigers (1934, 1937–45), Boston Red Sox (1946–47), Chicago White Sox(1947) and Philadelphia Athletics (1948). York was named to the American League All-Star team seven times. He broke Babe Ruth's record by hitting 18 home runs in a single month – a feat he accomplished as a rookie in 1937. In 1943, he led the American League with 34 home runs, 118 RBIs, a .527 slugging percentage, and 301 total bases. He was the starting first baseman and leading slugger for the Detroit team that won the 1945 World Series. After his playing career ended, he worked from 1951 to 1964 as a professional baseball manager, coach, and scout. He was the batting coach for the Boston Red Sox for four years from 1959 to 1962, including one game in July 1959 in which he acted as the team's interim manager.

John Geoffrey "Jeff" Heath (1 April 1915[1][a] – 9 December 1975) was a Canadian-born American left fielder in Major League Baseball (MLB) who played most of his career for the Cleveland Indians. He was one of the American League's most promising[2][3] power hitters of the late 1930s and early 1940s, twice led the AL in triples, and batted at least .340 with over 100 runs batted in (RBIs) each time. In 1941 he was selected to his first All-Star Game and that same season became the first player from the American League to become a member of the 20–20–20 club when he hit 20 each of doubles, triples and home runs in the same season. His other All-Star Game selections were in 1943 and 1945. Heath played for the Washington Senators and St. Louis Browns during the 1946 season and the National League's (NL) Boston Braves beginning in 1948. He incurred a compound fracture to his ankle in September 1948 and subsequently the Braves were without their starting left fielder for the 1948 World Series. In 1949, Heath's last season in the majors, sportswriter Franklin Lewis wrote, "There was the inimitable Heath who...should have been one of the greatest players in history. But there were no valves on his temper. He grinned in the manner of a schoolboy or he snarled with the viciousness of a tiger

2012 HA CHAMPIONS CLEV 1948 KELTNER, KEN MINT 9

Kenneth Frederick Keltner (October 31, 1916 – December 12, 1991) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a third baseman in Major League Baseball, most notably as a seven-time All-Star player for the Cleveland Indians with whom he won a World Series championship in 1948. He also played for the Boston Red Sox. Keltner was notable for being one of the best fielding third basemen in the 1940s and for helping to end Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak on July 17, 1941. Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Keltner began his professional baseball career in 1936 playing for his hometown team, the Milwaukee Brewers, then a minor league team. He made a rapid ascent through the minor leagues, and in 1938, the Cleveland Indians invited him to their spring training camp. The twenty-one-year-old Keltner made the team and played in 149 games that season, posting a .276 batting average with 26 home runs and 113 runs batted in. On August 20, 1938, as part of a publicity stunt by the Come to Cleveland Committee, Indians' catchers Frankie Pytlak and Hank Helf successfully caught baseballs dropped by Keltner from Cleveland's 708-foot-tall (216 m) Terminal Tower. The 708-foot (216 m) drop broke the 555-foot, 30-year-old record set by Washington Senator catcher Gabby Street at the Washington Monument. In 1939, Keltner improved his hitting statistics with a career-high .325 batting average along with 13 home runs and 97 runs batted in. He also embellished his defensive reputation with a .974 fielding percentage, and leading American League third basemen with 40 double plays and 187 putouts, appearing in all 154 games. Keltner earned his first All-Star berth in 1940. In the 1941 All-Star Game, he spearheaded a ninth inning four-run rally as the American League fought back from a 5-3 deficit. Keltner beat the throw to first base for an infield single to start the rally. Three batters later, he scored on a groundout before Ted Williams followed with a two-out, game-ending, three-run home run. Two weeks later, in a game against the New York Yankees on July 17, 1941, Keltner became part of baseball history when he made two impressive, backhanded defensive plays against Joe DiMaggio, as the latter attempted to extend his 56-game hitting streak.[2][6] DiMaggio walked and grounded out in his other two plate appearances, as the record-setting hitting streak came to an end. Keltner joined the United States Navy in 1945 and missed an entire season while serving in Hawaii. He returned to play for the Indians in 1946, earning his sixth All-Star selection in the process. Keltner had a career-season in 1948, placing third in the American League home runs with 31 and posting career-highs with 119 runs batted in, 91 runs, and 89 walks, and placed fifth in the league with a .522 slugging average, helping Cleveland earn a first-ever one-game playoff against the Boston Red Sox. The Indians won the game 8-3 behind knuckleballer Gene Bearden, with the help of Keltner's sin

Nicknamed "Rowdy Richard", Dick Bartell was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball. One of the most ferocious competitors of his era, he won both admirers and critics of each stop during a career which saw him traded every few seasons, often under acrimonious circumstances. While hitting .300 over a full season five times, he led the National League in double plays four times and in putouts and assists three times each. From 1927 through 1946, Bartell played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927-30), Philadelphia Phillies (1931-34), New York Giants (1935-38, 1941), Chicago Cubs (1939), and Detroit Tigers (1940-41). After two years of military service in World War II, he played briefly in 1946 before retiring. At 5'9" and 160 pounds, he batted and threw right handed.

John Edwin Blanchard (February 26, 1933 – March 25, 2009) was an American professional baseball outfielder and catcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, and Milwaukee Braves. A defensive liability for the Yankees for most of his career, Blanchard is probably best known for his play in the 1961 World Series. He hit two home runs in that series against the Cincinnati Reds and batted .400 for the entire series. In his career, Blanchard appeared in the World Series five times for the Yankees and holds the major league record with ten World Series pinch-hit at-bats. Blanchard was the catcher who called the pitch that Bill Mazeroski hit for the first-ever series-ending home run, which was hit off Ralph Terry in the 1960 World Series in which the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the heavily favored Yankees. Blanchard was traded to the Kansas City Athletics in 1965, as part of a three-player transaction. He remained with the team until September 1965, when his contract was sold to the Milwaukee Braves. After 10 games with the Braves in 1965, Blanchard did not play baseball in 1966; a comeback attempt in 1968 was unsuccessful. For his major league career, he played in 516 games, posting a .239 batting average, hitting 67 home runs, and driving in 200 runs.

Roland Frank Sheldon (born December 17, 1936) is a retired American professional baseball player, a right-handed pitcher who appeared in 160 Major League games from 1961 to 1962 and 1964 to 1966. Signed by the New York Yankees at age 23 after one season as a baseball and basketball player at UConn preceded by a semester at Texas A&M and four years of service in the United States Air Force, Sheldon experienced a meteoric rise at the outset of his professional career. In his first pro campaign, 1960, pitching in the Class D New York–Pennsylvania League, Sheldon won 15 games and lost one (for a winning percentage of .938) with 15 complete games. The following year, he made the 1961 Yankees' varsity roster out of spring training, survived the May cutdown from 28 to 25 men, and took a turn in the Bombers' starting rotation in July and August. On July 5 and 9, he tossed consecutive complete-game shutouts against the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox, as the Yankees kept pace with the Detroit Tigers in a heated, two-team pennant race—ultimately won convincingly by the Yankees in September. Sheldon would pitch in 35 games, including 21 starts, and win 11 of 16 decisions in a season dominated by the pursuit by Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle of Babe Ruth's single-season home run record. Sheldon, however, did not appear in the 1961 World Series, won by the Yankees in five games over the Cincinnati Reds. The 1962 season never saw Sheldon get untracked. He began the year pitching out of the Yankee bullpen, made 34 total appearances (with 16 starts) and posted a 7–8 record and a poor 5.49 earned run average. The Yankees again won the American League pennant, but again Sheldon was not used in the World Series, a seven-game triumph over the San Francisco Giants. He then spent all of 1963 and the first two months of 1964 back in the minors with Triple-A Richmond. Recalled by the Yankees in June 1964, Sheldon contributed to their successful pennant defense during a summer-long struggle against the Chicago White Sox and Baltimore Orioles. He appeared in 19 games, with 12 starts, threw three complete game victories and added a save coming out of the bullpen. He then appeared in Games 1 and 7 of the 1964 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, hurling 2? innings pitched of hitless, scoreless relief. The Yankees, however, lost both games and the series to the Redbirds. He began 1965 with three appearances as a relief pitcher out of the Yankee bullpen, but on May 3 he was traded to the cellar-dwelling Kansas City Athletics with Johnny Blanchard for Doc Edwards, a journeyman catcher. Sheldon managed a winning record, 10–8, with a 3.95 earned run average for a Kansas City team that lost 103 games. Then, in 1966, he posted a solid 3.13 ERA in 14 games for the Athletics, even though he lost seven of 11 decisions, through mid-June. Two days before the June 15 trade deadline, he was acquired by the Red Sox, another second-division club, in a six-player trade and

James Joseph Dykes was an American third and second baseman, manager and coach in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox from 1918 to 1939. He batted over .300 five times and led the American League in assists one at second base and twice at third base, ending his career sixth in AL history in games at third base (1,253), and seventh in putouts (1,361), assists (2,403), total chances (3,952) and double plays (199). When he retired he ranked eighth in AL history in games played (2,282), and ninth in at bats (8,046). He holds the Athletics franchise career double (365) and formerly held team marks for career games and at bats. He went on to become the winningest manager in White Sox history with 899 victories over 13 seasons, though his teams never finished above third place; he later became the first manager in history to win 1,000 games without capturing a league pennant.

George Elvin Walberg (July 27, 1896 – October 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1923 through 1937 for the New York Giants (1923), Philadelphia Athletics (1923–1933) and Boston Red Sox (1934–1937). Walberg batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Pine City, Minnesota. In a 15-season career, Walberg posted a 155–141 record with 1085 strikeouts and a 4.16 ERA in 2644 innings, including 15 shutouts and 140 complete games. A consistent and durable pitcher, Walberg averaged 16 wins for the Philadelphia Athletics of Connie Mack from 1926 to 1932, with career-highs of 20 wins in 1931 and 18 in 1929. He also had a 1–1 mark with a 1.93 ERA for the Athletics in five World Series appearances. A good-hitting pitcher, Walberg collected a .179 batting average with four home runs and 84 runs batted in. When Mack dismantled the Athletics in 1933, he was sent along with Lefty Grove and Max Bishop to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for two players and $150.000. He was a spot starter and reliever with Boston during three seasons and pitched his last game at the age of forty-one. Walberg surrendered 17 home runs to Babe Ruth, more than did any other pitcher. Walberg died in Tempe, Arizona at age 82. In 2002, he was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame.

Delmer Ennis (June 8, 1925 – February 8, 1996) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1946 to 1959 for the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, and Chicago White Sox. From 1949 to 1957, Ennis accumulated more runs batted in (RBIs) than anyone besides Stan Musial and was eighth in the National League in home runs. In 1950 he led the National League with 126 RBIs as the Phillies won their first pennant in 35 years. He held the Phillies career record of 259 home runs from 1956 to 1980, and ranked 10th in NL history with 1,824 games in the outfield when his career ended.

Curtis Thomas Simmons (born May 19, 1929) is an American former professional baseball left-handed pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1947 to 1950 and 1952 to 1967. Along with right-hander Robin Roberts (a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame), Simmons was one of the twin anchors of the starting rotation of the "Whiz Kids", the Philadelphia Phillies' 1950 National League (NL) championship team. He is the youngest surviving player from the team. Simmons is also the oldest living former member of the Los Angeles Angels organization. He also played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs.

James Joseph Dykes (November 10, 1896 – June 15, 1976) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as a third and second baseman from 1918 through 1939, most notably as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics dynasty that won three consecutive American League pennants from 1929 to 1931 and, won the World Series in 1929 and 1930. He played his final six seasons for the Chicago White Sox. Dykes batted over .300 five times during his career and was a member of one of the most feared batting orders in the history of baseball featuring three future Baseball Hall of Fame members (Al Simmons, Jimmie Foxx, and Mickey Cochrane). He also excelled as a defensive player, leading the American League in assists once at second base and twice at third base, ending his career sixth in AL history in games at third base (1,253), and seventh in putouts (1,361), assists (2,403), total chances (3,952) and double plays (199). At the time of his retirement, Dykes ranked eighth in American League history in games played (2,282), and ninth in at bats (8,046). He holds the Athletics franchise record for career doubles (365), and formerly held team marks for career games and at bats. After his playing career, Dykes became the winningest manager in Chicago White Sox history with 899 victories over 13 seasons, though his teams never finished above third place; he later became the first manager in history to win 1,000 games without capturing a league pennant.

William Anthony Hallahan (August 4, 1902 – July 8, 1981) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1920s and 1930s. Nicknamed "Wild Bill" because of his lack of control on the mound—he twice led the National League in bases on balls—Hallahan nevertheless was one of the pitching stars of the 1931 World Series and pitched his finest in postseason competition. He also was the starting pitcher for the National League in the first All-Star Game in 1933, losing a 4–2 decision to Lefty Gomez of the American League and surrendering a third-inning home run to Babe Ruth in the process.

Lewis Sidney Riggs (April 22, 1910 – August 12, 1975) born in Caswell County, North Carolina was a third baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals (1934), Cincinnati Reds (1935–40) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1941–42 and 1946). He helped the Cardinals win the 1934 World Series, the Reds win the 1939 National League pennant and 1940 World Series and the Dodgers win the 1941 NL pennant. He was named to the 1936 National League All-Star team. His eighth-inning pinch single off Red Ruffing scored teammate Cookie Lavagetto in the opening game of the 1941 World Series, before Ruffing and the New York Yankees held on for a 3-2 victory. Riggs never quite achieved the same level in his baseball career after leaving the Dodgers in 1942 in order to serve his country in the Army Air Force during World War II. In 10 seasons he played in 760 Games and had 2,477 At Bats, 298 Runs, 650 Hits, 110 Doubles, 43 Triples, 28 Home Runs, 271 RBI, 22 Stolen Bases, 181 Walks, .262 Batting Average, .317 On-base percentage, .375 Slugging Percentage, 930 Total Bases and 37 Sacrifice Hits.

Samuel Paul Derringer (October 17, 1906 – November 17, 1987) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for three National League teams from 1931 to 1945, primarily the Cincinnati Reds. He won 20 games for Cincinnati four times between 1935 and 1940, peaking with a 25–7 season in 1939 as the Reds won the NL pennant for the first time in 20 years. His 161 victories with Cincinnati are the club record for a right-hander, and rank second in franchise history to Eppa Rixey's 179; he also held the team record for career strikeouts when his career ended. His 579 games pitched ranked eighth in NL history when he retired, and his average of 1.88 walks per 9 innings pitched ranked behind only Christy Mathewson (1.59) and Grover Cleveland Alexander (1.65) among pitchers with 3000 innings in the NL since 1900.

Max Edward West (November 28, 1916 – December 31, 2003), was an outfielder and first baseman for the Boston Bees/Braves (1938–42 and 1946), Cincinnati Reds (1946) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1948). West signed as an outfielder with Sacramento of the PCL in 1935 and joined Mission of the same league the following year. After batting .330 with 16 home runs and 95 RBIs for Mission in 1937, West's contract was purchased by the Boston Braves. He batted .234 his rookie year but increased his average to .285 in 1939 with 19 home runs and 82 RBIs (all career highs), finishing 23rd in voting for the 1939 National League MVP. West was named to the 1940 National League All-Star Team, his only career appearance, and was inserted as the starting right fielder at the last minute by NL manager Bill McKechnie (over Mel Ott). In his only career All-Star at bat, he hit what would be the eventual game-winner, a three-run home run in the first inning off Red Ruffing at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. This would, however be West's only All-Star plate appearance, as he was injured (although not seriously) leaping for Luke Appling's double off the wall in the second inning and had to leave the game. West finished 26th in voting for the 1940 NL MVP, and 27th in voting for the 1942 NL MVP. In March 1943, West joined the Army Air Force, serving with the Sixth Ferrying Group, Air Transport Command at Long Beach, California, where he regularly played baseball with (the aforementioned) Ruffing, Jerry Priddy and Nany Fernandez. In April 1946, after returning from military service, West was traded to the Cincinnati Reds for Jim Konstanty. He played just 73 games that year, batting .212. West was with San Diego of the Pacific Coast League in 1947, returned to Pittsburgh in 1948 (where he batted just .178 in 87 games) and returned to San Diego the following year. West led the Pacific Coast League in home runs on three occasions, and in 1949 he hit 48 home runs with 166 RBIs. He continued playing in the PCL until 1954. In seven seasons, West played in 824 Games and had 2,676 At Bats, 338 Runs, 681 Hits, 136 Doubles, 20 Triples, 77 Home Runs, 380 RBI, 19 Stolen Bases, 353 Walks, .254 Batting Average, .344 On-base percentage, .407 Slugging percentage, 1,088 Total bases and 15 Sacrifice hits.

George Henry "Snuffy" Stirnweiss (October 26, 1918 – September 15, 1958) was an American professional baseball second baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1943 and 1952, spending most of his MLB career with the New York Yankees, and spending his last couple of seasons playing with the St. Louis Browns and the Cleveland Indians. A batting champion in 1945 and a two-time All-Star, he played a role with three different World Series championship squads during his time in New York. Stirnweiss spent the first three seasons of his professional baseball career in the minor leagues, playing the majority of his first season for the Norfolk Tars of the Piedmont League before being promoted and spending two full seasons in 1941 and 1942 in Double-A with the Newark Bears, a member of the International League. A second baseman, Stirnweiss posted moderate statistics in the minors, but with Joe Gordon as the incumbent second baseman at the top flight in the organization, Stirnweiss was not due for a promotion to New York. For his part, Gordon was named the Most Valuable Player of the American League in 1942 after posting a .322 batting average and 103 runs batted in. However, the United States joined World War II after the 1941 MLB season, and in the next couple of years, many prominent MLB superstars joined the military; among others, Joe Gordon and Joe DiMaggio served for years in the military as well as Charlie Keller spending 1944 on military duty. For Stirnweiss, the war was the break he needed to get his foot in the door in the Major Leagues. When Stirnweiss was 24, the Yankees promoted him to the majors for the 1943 season. He posted meager numbers for a utility player dividing his time between shortstop and second base. In 83 games, he hit .219 while providing uneven results as a base stealer and only thirteen extra base hits in over 300 plate appearances. He hit his first career home run, and his only home run of 1943, in a late-August double header at Briggs Stadium in Detroit in a 5–1 New York win. The 1943 Yankees won the American League pennant with 98 wins; Stirnweiss played little in the World Series that year. Stirnweiss only managed to earn one plate appearance, serving as a pinch-hitter for the pitcher Hank Borowy late in Game 3 with the Yankees trailing, but on a subsequent sacrifice bunt, the third baseman committed an error, paving the way for a five-run rally in a game New York won, 6–2. The Yankees, having lost in the previous year's World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in upset fashion, returned the favor in 1943 and won the championship in five games.

Joseph "Flash" Gordon was a model of consistency throughout his 11-year major league career with the New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians. Gordon made his debut on April 18, 1938, and belted 25 home runs with a slugging percentage of .502 in his rookie season with the Yankees. He hit .322 in 1942 en route to the American League Most Valuable Player Award and was named to the AL All-Star team nine times. He hit 20-or-more home runs in seven seasons and drove in at least 100 runs four times. Gordon won four World Series titles with the Yankees and another with the Indians in 1948. Elected 2009.

Joseph Black (February 8, 1924 – May 17, 2002) was an American right-handed pitcher in Negro League and Major League Baseball for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Cincinnati Redlegs, and Washington Senators who became the first black pitcher to win a World Series game, in 1952. Black helped the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro Leagues win two championships in seven years. He and Jackie Robinson pushed for a pension plan for Negro League players and instrumental in the inclusion of players who played before 1944. Black then played for a year in the Brooklyn Dodgers' minor league system. The Dodgers promoted Black to the major leagues in 1952 at 28, five years after teammate Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier. He roomed with Robinson while with Brooklyn. Black was chosen Rookie of the Year after winning 15 games and saving 15 others for the National League champions. He had a 2.15 ERA but, with 142 innings pitched, fell eight innings short of winning the ERA title. Strapped for pitching, Dodgers manager Chuck Dressen brought Black out of the bullpen and started him three times in seven days in the 1952 World Series against the New York Yankees. He won the opener with a six-hitter over Allie Reynolds, 4–2, then lost the fourth game, 2–0, and the seventh, 4–2. The spring after the World Series, Dressen urged Black to add some pitches to his strong slowball, which was his favorite pitch. In six seasons, he compiled a 30–12 record, half of his wins coming in his rookie season.

Carl Daniel Erskine (born December 13, 1926) is a former right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 through 1959. He was a pitching mainstay on Dodger teams which won five National League pennants, peaking with a 1953 season in which he won 20 games and set a World Series record with 14 strikeouts in a single game. Erskine pitched two of the NL's seven no-hitters during the 1950s. He broke into the majors a year before Don Newcombe, and from 1948–50 was used primarily as a reliever, going 21-10. In 1951, he mixed 19 starts with 27 relief appearances, and went 16-12. Erskine was 14-6 in 1952 with a career-best 2.70 earned run average, then had his 20-win season in 1953, leading the league with a .769 winning percentage along with 187 strikeouts and 16 complete games, all career highs. This was followed by 18-15 in 1954, posting career highs in starts (37) and innings (260-1/3), then by 11-8 in 1955 and 13-11 in 1956. When Newcombe was pitching in the ninth inning of the third game of the playoff with the New York Giants on October 3, 1951, Erskine and Ralph Branca were warming up in the bullpen. On the recommendation of pitching coach Clyde Sukeforth, who thought that Branca had better stuff, Newcombe was relieved by Branca, who then gave up the game-winning home run to Bobby Thomson. Whenever Erskine was asked what his best pitch was, he replied, "The curveball I bounced in the Polo Grounds bullpen in 1951." Erskine, author of two no-hitters (against the Chicago Cubs on June 19, 1952 and the New York Giants on May 12, 1956), was a member of the beloved Dodgers team which won the 1955 World Series for the franchise's first Series title. He appeared in eleven World Series games (1949–52–53-55-56), and made the NL All-Star team in 1954. His 14 strikeouts as the winner of Game 3 of the 1953 Fall Classic – including striking out the side in the ninth inning – broke the Series record of 13 held by Howard Ehmke (1929, Game 1), and stood for 10 years until Sandy Koufax struck out 15 New York Yankees in the first game of the 1963 World Series; but he was ineffective in Games 1 and 6, although he was not charged with the losses. From 1951 through 1956, Erskine won 92 games while losing only 58, which helped the Dodgers to four pennants during the "Boys of Summer" era. During his years in Brooklyn, he was affectionately known as "Oisk" by the fans with their Brooklyn accents. In 1957, Erskine moved to Los Angeles with the team the following year, but lasted only a season and a half. He made his final appearance on June 14, 1959. In a twelve-season career, he posted a 122-78 (.610) record with 981 strikeouts and a 4.00 ERA in 1718.2 innings pitched.

Carl Anthony Furillo (March 8, 1922 – January 21, 1989), nicknamed "The Reading Rifle" and "Skoonj", was an American professional baseball right fielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB), spending his entire career with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers. A member of seven National League (NL) champions from 1947 to 1959 inclusive, Furillo batted over .300 five times, winning the 1953 batting title, with a .344 average — then the highest by a right-handed hitting Dodger since 1900. Noted for his strong and accurate throwing arm, he recorded 10 or more assists in nine consecutive seasons, leading the league twice, and retired with the fifth-most games in right field (1,408) in NL history. Arriving in the major leagues in 1946, he batted .295 for the 1947 NL pennant winners, finishing the year ninth in the league with 88 runs batted in. He was one of the key members on the Dodgers' 1949 champions, hitting .322 (4th in the NL) with 18 home runs, and placing among the league's top ten players in RBI (106), slugging average (.506), hits (177), runs (95), triples (10) and total bases (278); he finished sixth in the voting for the MVP Award. In 1950 he batted .305 (7th in the league) with 18 home runs, 106 RBI, and a career-high 99 runs. He achieved a personal best with 197 hits, finishing third in the NL for the second year in a row, for the 1951 team which lost a legendary pennant playoff to the New York Giants; he also batted .295 (9th in the NL) with 91 RBI and 93 runs. In that year he set a team record with 667 at bats, exceeding Ivy Olson's 1921 total of 652; Maury Wills broke his mark with 695 in 1962. He became skilled at negotiating balls hit off the high right-field wall at Ebbets Field, and after he led the NL in assists in both 1950 (18) and 1951 (24), opposing runners were increasingly reluctant to challenge his arm. On August 27, 1951, he threw out Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Mel Queen by two feet at first base after Queen had apparently singled into right field. Furillo batted only .247 for the 1952 pennant winners, though he was selected to his first All-Star team. Diagnosed with cataracts, he had surgery in the offseason and returned with perhaps his best season, winning the batting title and collecting 21 home runs and 92 RBI with a career-best 38 doubles (3rd in the NL). His .344 average was the highest by a right-handed Dodgers hitter since Oyster Burns hit .354 in 1894; Tommy Davis would better him with a .346 mark in 1962. He was again named an All-Star, ending the year fifth in the league in slugging (.580), and finished ninth in the MVP balloting.

Clement Walter Labine (August 6, 1926 – March 2, 2007) was an American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his years with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1950 to 1960. As a key member of the Dodgers in the early 1950s, he helped the team to its first World Series title in 1955 with a win and a save in four games. He is one of six players in MLB history to have won back-to back World Series championships on different teams, the other five being Ben Zobrist, Jake Peavy, Jack Morris, Bill Skowron, and Don Gullett. He held the National League record for career saves from 1958 until 1962; his 96 career saves ranked fourth in Major League history when he retired. He also set a Dodgers franchise record of 425 career games pitched. Labine accompanied the Dodgers to Los Angeles when they relocated after the 1957 season, and in 1958 surpassed Al Brazle's NL record of 60 career saves. In 1959 he broke Brickyard Kennedy's franchise record of 381 games pitched; the Dodgers won the World Series again that year, defeating the Chicago White Sox, although Labine pitched only one inning in Game 1's blowout loss. His career appeared to be in jeopardy in 1960 when the Dodgers traded him to the Detroit Tigers in June after Labine had compiled an earned run average of 5.82. The Tigers subsequently released him on August 15, 1960 after he pitched 14 games for them, going 0–3, with an earned run average of 5.12. The Pittsburgh Pirates signed Labine the following day. The Pirates were in the National League pennant race and needed another right-handed reliever to complement Roy Face. Labine proved to be a valuable addition to the Pirates' bullpen. In 15 games for the Pirates through the remainder of the season, he compiled a record of 3–0 with 3 saves and an earned run average of 1.48 as he helped the Pirates win the National League pennant and go on to the 1960 World Series. But Labine appeared only in three blowout losses during the Series win over the New York Yankees. After remaining with the Pirates in 1961, he ended his career with the New York Mets, pitching in three games during the Mets' debut 1962 season, including an inning in the Mets' very first game. Later that year, the Pirates' Roy Face passed Labine's NL mark of 94 career saves. Over all or parts of 13 seasons, Labine appeared in 513 games, winning 77 and losing 56 (.579) with a 3.63 earned run average. He appeared in 13 World Series games, winning two and losing two, with a 3.16 ERA. His 96 career saves then trailed only Johnny Murphy (107), Ellis Kinder (102) and Firpo Marberry (101) in major league history. In 1966, Labine's Dodger career records of 425 games pitched and 83 saves were broken by Don Drysdale and Ron Perranoski respectively.

Joseph Francis Page (October 28, 1917 – April 21, 1980), nicknamed Fireman and The Gay Reliever,[1] was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher. Page, who was left-handed, played with the New York Yankees from 1944 to 1950 and with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. Page was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. After spending time in the Yankees farm system, Page made his Major League Baseball debut on April 19, 1944 where he began his career as a starter. In his rookie season (starting 16 games, and relieving in three others), Page was voted to play in the All-Star Game and ended his season with over 100 innings pitched and a 4.56 ERA. The next season, Page suffered a shoulder injury, which led him to start only nine of the twenty games he pitched. That season, Page improved his ERA to 2.82, along with a 6–3 record. In 1946, Page split his time between closing and starting games, and he picked up three saves while posting a 3.57 ERA and a 9–8 record. In 1947, Page spent practically the whole season in the bullpen and only started twice. He was voted to play in the All-Star Game once again, because of his 2.48 ERA and a 14–8 record. He also led the American League with 17 saves this season. (Note that the save statistic was not an official baseball statistic until 1969, and had not even entered common usage until well after Page did this; this feat is something that is only retroactively appreciated. However, it was certainly appreciated at the time that Page played a greater than average role as the Yankees relief pitcher, at a time when there was no generally acknowledged "closing pitcher" role in baseball, and when starting pitchers were more often expected to finish complete games.) His fourteen relief wins in 1947 was an American League record until Luis Arroyo broke it in 1961. He was fourth in the league in American League MVP voting. In the seventh game of the 1947 World Series he earned the save by inducing Brooklyn Dodgers hitter Eddie Miksis to hit into a series-ending double play.

George Thomas "Shotgun" Shuba (December 13, 1924 – September 29, 2014) was a utility outfielder and left-handed pinch hitter in Major League Baseball who played seven seasons for the Brooklyn Dodgers. His seven seasons included three World Series as well as a World Series championship in 1955. He was the first National League player to hit a pinch-hit home run in a World Series game. Shuba is often remembered for his symbolic role in breaking down Major League Baseball's tenacious "color barrier" While playing for the AAA Montreal Royals in 1946, Shuba offered a congratulatory handshake to teammate Jackie Robinson, who went on to become the first African American to play in a major league game since the late 19th century.[2] The moment was captured in a well-known photograph dubbed A Handshake for the Century for featuring the first interracial handshake in a professional baseball game. In the early 1970s, Shuba's major league career was featured in a chapter of Roger Kahn's The Boys of Summer, a tribute to the 1950s Brooklyn Dodgers.[1] Kahn observed in his book that Shuba earned his nickname, "Shotgun", by "spraying line drives with a swing so compact that it appeared as natural as a smile". After signing a contract with the Dodgers, Shuba played for farm teams in New Orleans and Mobile.[8] He later recalled that his father opposed the move, because he "thought I should go and work in the mills like him".[7] Shuba pursued his goal, however, developing his "natural" swing by practicing for hours with a rope that was tied to the ceiling. He made knots in the rope where the strike zone would be and swung a bat at the rope 600 times a day. This rigorously observed ritual prepared Shuba to compete in the major leagues, where his powerful line drives later earned him the nickname, "Shotgun". On the afternoon of April 18, 1946, Robinson became the first black player in modern organized baseball when he made his debut with the Dodgers’ Montreal Royals farm team in their International League opener against the Jersey City Giants. In the third inning, Robinson hit a three-run homer over the left-field fence. When he completed his trip around the bases, Shuba, the Royals’ left fielder and their next batter, shook his hand. Congratulating a home-run hitter was a commonplace ritual, but Shuba's welcome to a smiling Robinson was captured in an Associated Press photograph that has endured as a portrait of racial tolerance.

Peter Press Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988), known by his nickname Pistol Pete, was an American professional basketball player. Maravich was born in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, and raised in the Carolinas. Maravich starred in college at Louisiana State University (LSU) while playing for his father, head coach Press Maravich. He played for three NBA teams until injuries forced his retirement in 1980 following a ten-year career. He is the all-time leading NCAA Division I scorer with 3,667 points scored and an average of 44.2 points per game. All of his accomplishments were achieved before the adoption of the three point line and shot clock, and despite being unable to play varsity as a freshman under then-NCAA rules. One of the youngest players ever inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Maravich was cited by the Hall as "perhaps the greatest creative offensive talent in history".In an April 2010 interview, Hall of Fame player John Havlicek said that "the best ball-handler of all time was Pete Maravich".Maravich died suddenly at age 40 during a pick-up game in 1988 as a consequence of a previously undetected heart defect.

Peter Press Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988), known by his nickname Pistol Pete, was an American professional basketball player. Maravich was born in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, and raised in the Carolinas. Maravich starred in college at Louisiana State University (LSU) while playing for his father, head coach Press Maravich. He played for three NBA teams until injuries forced his retirement in 1980 following a ten-year career. He is the all-time leading NCAA Division I scorer with 3,667 points scored and an average of 44.2 points per game. All of his accomplishments were achieved before the adoption of the three point line and shot clock, and despite being unable to play varsity as a freshman under then-NCAA rules. One of the youngest players ever inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Maravich was cited by the Hall as "perhaps the greatest creative offensive talent in history".In an April 2010 interview, Hall of Fame player John Havlicek said that "the best ball-handler of all time was Pete Maravich".Maravich died suddenly at age 40 during a pick-up game in 1988 as a consequence of a previously undetected heart defect.

Melvin Thomas "Mel" Ott was a New York Giants hero for 22 seasons, during which he emerged as one of the game's premier sluggers. As a 17-year old "Boy Wonder" in 1926, Ott's size belied his power. Using an unorthodox batting style in which he lifted his right foot prior to impact, he smashed 511 home runs, then a National League record. He hit 30-or-more homers in a season eight times and led or shared the league lead on six occasions. "Master Melvin" earned 11 consecutive All-Star selections and batted .304 lifetime with 488 doubles NS 1,860 RBI. Elected 1951.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

With 2,678 career hits and 1,602 managerial wins, Fred Clarke excelled both on the field and in the dugout. In his first big league game, he went 5-for-5 on his way to fashioning a career .313 batting average, topping .300 in 11 seasons. In 1903, he led the league in doubles and slugging percentage while piloting the Pittsburgh Pirates to an appearance in the first modern World Series. A full-time player-manger in 15 of his 19 seasons at the helm, Clarke led his clubs to four first-place finishes. Elected 1945.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

Clark Griffith was a baseball pioneer his entire life. In 1901, "The Old Fox" became a player-manager for the Chicago White Sox in the new American League, leading them to a pennant. Griffith managed until 1920, when he became the Washington Senators principal owner after being a part owner since 1912. Innovative with limited finances, he won three pennants, hired entertainers for fans to enjoy and signed many Cuban players. "He was the greatest humanitarian who ever lived, and the greatest pillar of honesty ever had," said Bobo Newsom. "I never played for a better man. Elected 1946.

Napoleon "Nap" Lajoie combined graceful fielding with precision at the plate. Lajoie hit .300 or better in 17 of 21 seasons, topping .350 in nine campaigns and his high of .426 in 1901 remains an American League single-season record. That year, he won the AL Triple Crown and initiated the first court challenge to the reserve clause. By 1903, the Cleveland club became known as the "Naps" as a tribute to his star power. Billy Murphy, a St. Louis journalist, once wrote; "As long as baseball lives, the memory of Lajoie will last; and it ever will be a fresh memory of a ball player and a gentlemen. Elected 1937.

The greatest master of the legal spitball, "Big Ed" Walsh averaged 24 wins per season for the Chicago Whit Sox during a seven-year span from 1906 to 1912. The right-hander is best remembered for his amazing 1908 campaign, when he finished with a 40-15 record, 42 compete games, 11 shutouts, 269 strikeouts and a 20th-centruy record 464 innings pitched. During a six-year span, he average 375 innings per season. "Although I worked hard in the mines," he said during that run, "I work harder when I play ball." Elected 1946.

The greatest master of the legal spitball, "Big Ed" Walsh averaged 24 wins per season for the Chicago Whit Sox during a seven-year span from 1906 to 1912. The right-hander is best remembered for his amazing 1908 campaign, when he finished with a 40-15 record, 42 compete games, 11 shutouts, 269 strikeouts and a 20th-centruy record 464 innings pitched. During a six-year span, he average 375 innings per season. "Although I worked hard in the mines," he said during that run, "I work harder when I play ball." Elected 1946.

According to legend, New York Giants manager John McGraw received a flippant scouting report on Paul Waner: "That little punk don't even know how to put on a uniform," Upon seeing Waner play, McGraw fired the scout. "That little punt don't know how to put on a uniform, but he's removed three of my pitchers with line drives this week," McGraw roared. Waner began his baseball career as a pitcher, but his hitting prowess assured that "Big Poison" would play every day. During a 20-year career, Waner accumulated 3,152 hits, batted .333, won three National League batting championships and garnered the 1927 MVP Award. Elected 1952.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

Darrell Elijah (Cy) Blanton (July 6, 1908 – September 13, 1945) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies. Blanton batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Blanton was a screwball pitcher. Blanton grew up in Trousdale, Oklahoma, and was living in Shawnee, Oklahoma, playing on sandlot teams. In 1929 he joined the Shawnee Robins, a C Class team in the Western Association. Blanton was a pitcher for the Independence Producers in 1931. The Independence Producers were a Class C minor league team located in Independence, Kansas. Blanton had twelve wins and eight losses for the season. Blanton was one of the mainstays of the Pittsburgh Pirates rotation in the mid-1930s. He pitched for the Albany Senators in 1934, being promoted to Pittsburgh to pitch one game. Earlier he pitched in the Piedmont League and the Western Association. In his 1935 rookie season he recorded 18 wins with 142 strikeouts and led the National League in earned run average (2.58) and shutouts (4). He averaged 12.67 wins for the next three years, leading again the league in shutouts in 1936 (4) and starts in 1937 (34). A free agent before the 1940 season, he signed with the Philadelphia Phillies. Although he made the National League All-Star team in 1937 and 1941, he never showed again the brilliance of his first season. He last pitched for the Phillies in 1942, being released after a month long stay in hospital due to kidney problems. In a nine-season career, Blanton posted a 68–71 record with a 3.55 ERA and 611 strikeouts.

With the nickname "sunny Jim" that reflected his upbeat demeanor, James Leroy Bottomley became the first major league Most Valuable Player to emerged from a team's own farm system, doing so for the St' Louis Cardinals in 1928. Bottomley played more than 1,809 games at first base, owning a lifetime battering average of .310 and posting nine seasons of .300 or better. In 1928 Bottomley led the National League in home runs and RBI, while guiding the Cardinals to the World Series. He authored one of the greatest single-game performances in history on Sept. 16, 1924, recording 12 RBI with two home runs, three singles and a double. Elected 1974.

Thomas Francis Aloysius Carey (October 11, 1906 – February 21, 1970) was a second baseman who played in Major League Baseball between 1935 and 1946. Nicknamed "Scoops" for his defensive ability, Carey batted and threw right-handed. The native of Hoboken, New Jersey, began his professional baseball career with the Chambersburg Young Yanks of the Blue Ridge League in 1930. He had a batting average of .306 that year, a personal best. He then was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals' organization and toiled in their system for five years, including three with the top-level Rochester Red Wings. Carey reached the majors in 1936 with the Cardinals' American League rivals, the St. Louis Browns, spending three years with them before moving to the Boston Red Sox (1939–42; 1946). His most productive season came in his rookie season with the Browns, when he hit .273 and posted career-highs in runs (58), RBI (57), doubles (27), triples (6) and games played (134). In an eight-season career, Carey was a .275 hitter with 418 hits two home runs and 167 RBI in 466 games. Carey missed the 1943–45 baseball seasons while serving in the United States Navy during World War II. In 1946, he returned to the Red Sox, but played only three games before joining the coaching staff of manager Joe Cronin for the balance of the season, during which Boston won the AL pennant. He then worked briefly in the Red Sox' farm system as a coach and manager.

William Pinkney DeLancey (November 28, 1911 – November 28, 1946) was an American professional baseball player during the 1930s. As a 22-year-old rookie catcher in 1934, he helped to lead the St. Louis Cardinals' fabled Gashouse Gang team to the world championship; but, after only one more full big-league season, he was stricken with tuberculosis, effectively ending his playing career. In 1934, he made the Cardinals' roster and, as a left-handed hitter, platooned with the right-handed Spud Davis to share the Cardinals' regular catching job. He became a favorite of player-manager Frankie Frisch,[1] and performed admirably on the field, hitting .316 with 80 hits, 18 doubles, 13 home runs, 41 bases on balls and an OPS of .979 in 295 plate appearances. The catching platoon—Davis started 89 games, and DeLancey 65—was highly effective, as the veteran Davis, 29, hit an even .300 with 65 runs batted in and an .830 OPS. The Cardinals outlasted the New York Giants in a September pennant race to take the National League championship on September 29. DeLancey was behind the plate during the clincher, catching fellow rookie Paul Dean's complete game. The Cardinals' opponents in the 1934 World Series, the American League champion Detroit Tigers, featured an all-right-handed starting rotation, and manager Frisch responded by starting DeLancey as his catcher in every contest. DeLancey caught every inning (Davis was a perfect two-for-two as a pinch hitter), as St. Louis prevailed in seven games. DeLancey collected only five hits in 29 at bats, but four of them were for extra bases, including three doubles and a home run, hit off Tommy Bridges in Game 5 at Sportsman's Park. DeLancey also drove in four runs. The DeLancey-Davis catching platoon returned in 1935, but DeLancey got off to a sluggish start at the plate. He recovered in midyear and lifted his batting average to .321 on July 21, before fading to .279 during the heat of August and September. He also began to experience loss of energy and appetite.[4] Still, he started half of the Cardinals' 154 regular-season games. During an off-season sandlot game, however, he collapsed and was diagnosed with tuberculosis. Realizing the seriousness of his condition while recuperating in Arizona, he voluntarily retired from the Cardinals on February 12, 1936.

Charles Philip "Chick" Fullis (February 27, 1904 – March 28, 1946) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Giants (1928–32), Philadelphia Phillies (1933–34) and St. Louis Cardinals (1934, 1936), primarily as a center fielder. Fullis batted and threw right-handed. Born in Girardville, Pennsylvania, Fullis posted a .295 batting average with 12 home runs and 167 RBI in 590 games played during his career. He was a member of the Cardinals' 1934 World Series winners. Fullis was forced to retire at age 33 due to eye trouble. Fullis' best season statistically came in 1933, the only season during his career in which he exceeded 100 games played. That year, he led the National League in at bats (647) and singles (162) while posting a .309 batting average with 200 hits, 91 runs, 45 RBI, 31 doubles and 18 stolen bases—all career highs. He also led all NL outfielders with 410 putouts.

Undeniably the hardest throwing pitcher of his era, Walter Johnson was celebrated as much for his character as for his heroics on the mound. In a career that spanned from the rowdy Deadball Era through the Jazz Age. "The Big Train" always behaved in a noble and gentlemanly fashion, both on and off the field. "I throw as hard as I can when I think I have to throw as hard as I can," he reasoned when endlessly questioned about his fastball. Pitching his entire big league career with the Washington Senators in the nation's capital, Johnson finished with 417 wins, second only to Cy Young and 3,509 strikeouts, a record that stood for 56 years. Elected 1936.

Al Simmons grew up in a poor section of Milwaukee and was a classic case of local boy making good, playing parts of his first two professional seasons with the minor league Milwaukee Brewers. "Bucketfoot Al" was the consummate ballplayer - he could run, hit for power and average, and was an excellent fielder with a tremendous throwing arm. Paired with Jimmie Foxx on the Philadelphia Athletics, the two sluggers formed a dangerous 1-2 punch, leading the club to three straight appearances in the World Series (1929-1931). Simmons was a favorite of Connie Mack, who once said, "I wish I had nine players named Al Simmons." Elected 1953.

Homer Wayne Summa (November 3, 1898 – January 29, 1966) was an American professional baseball right fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1920 to 1930. He began his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates, but played most of his career for the Cleveland Indians before finishing as a reserve with the Philadelphia Athletics. His career batting average was .302. He is buried in Glendale, California's Grand View Memorial Park Cemetery. On May 31, 1927, he became the first player in history to hit into a game ending unassisted triple play. In 840 games over 10 seasons, Summa compiled a .302 batting average (905-for-3001) with 413 runs, 166 doubles, 34 triples, 18 home runs, 363 RBI, 166 base on balls,.346 on-base percentage and .398 slugging percentage. Defensively, he recorded a .960 fielding percentage.

James Anthony Tobin (December 27, 1912 – May 19, 1969), known as "Abba Dabba", was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Doves / Braves and Detroit Tigers from 1937 to 1945. With the Boston Braves in 1944, he pitched two no-hitters, although one of them was five innings, which was considered a no-hitter until 1991 when the MLB officially defined a no-hitter as having to be nine innings or longer. obin was born in Oakland, California, where the hometown Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League picked him up. They sent him to their Bisbee-Douglas farm team in the Arizona–Texas League. The New York Yankees signed him shortly thereafter. He played for them in Binghamton and Wheeling in 1933 and 1934. The Yankees sent him back to Oakland in 1935, where he compiled an 11–8 record before tearing the cartilage in his left knee. Appendicitis kept him off the Yankee roster the following year, and he went 16–8 for the Oaks. Rather than return to the Oaks in 1937, he arranged a deal with the Pittsburgh Pirates, with whom he made his major league debut on April 30, 1937. In 1940, Tobin joined the Boston Braves. On May 13, 1942, he became the only pitcher in modern major-league history to hit three home runs in one game (Guy Hecker hit three homers in a game in the 19th century). He finished the 1942 season with a 12 wins and league leading 21 loses record and pitched a league leading 20 homeruns to opposing batters. He also hit 6 homeruns that year as a pitcher and pinch-hitter. Still with the Braves in 1944, Tobin began throwing a knuckleball, and that season he threw his two no-hitters. The first was April 27, 1944 when he beat the Brooklyn Dodgers 2–0. The second was a five inning game on June 22, 1944, in which the Philadelphia Phillies fell 7–0 (officially, this game is no longer considered a true no-hitter, as it lasted fewer than nine innings). In another interesting event in 1944, Tobin drew a walk against Cincinnati Reds pitcher Clyde Shoun in the third inning of what would otherwise have been a perfect game for Shoun (who settled instead for a no-hitter). Tobin was with the Tigers in 1945, when they won the American League pennant and the World Series. He pitched in Game 1 of the series, on October 3, which was his final major league game. While Tobin played only one major league game at a position other than pitcher, he pinch-hit over 100 times in his major league career. The fine-hitting hurler batted .230/.303/.345 in the majors. He totaled 35 doubles, 17 homers and 102 RBI in 796 at-bats. Tobin went 105–112 in the majors with a 3.44 ERA. He completed 156 of 227 career starts and led the league in complete games twice in 1942 and again in 1944 with 28 gamed completed each season. In 1942 workhorse Tobin lead the league in innings pitched with 287.2. Although not leading the league he pitched 2991/3 innings in 1944

Mildred Ella "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias (June 26, 1911 – September 27, 1956) was an American athlete who excelled in golf, basketball, baseball and track and field. She won two gold medals in track and field at the 1932 Summer Olympics, before turning to professional golf and winning 10 LPGA major championships. She is widely regarded as one of the greatest athletes of all time. Mildred Ella Didrikson was born on June 26, 1911, the sixth of seven children, in the coastal city of Port Arthur, Texas. Her mother, Hannah, and her father, Ole Didriksen, were immigrants from Norway. Although her three eldest siblings were born in Norway, Babe and her three other siblings were born in Port Arthur. She later changed the spelling of her surname from Didriksen to Didrikson. She moved with her family to 850 Doucette in Beaumont, Texas, at age 4. She claimed to have acquired the nickname "Babe" (after Babe Ruth) upon hitting five home runs in a childhood baseball game, but her Norwegian mother had called her "Bebe" from the time she was a toddler. Though best known for her athletic gifts, Didrikson had many talents. She also competed in sewing. An excellent seamstress, she made many of her clothes, including her golfing outfits. She claimed to have won the sewing championship at the 1931 State Fair of Texas in Dallas; she did win the South Texas State Fair in Beaumont, embellishing the story many years later in 1953. She attended Beaumont High School. Never a strong student, she was forced to repeat the eighth grade and was a year older than her classmates. She eventually dropped out without graduating after she moved to Dallas to play basketball.[5] She was a singer and a harmonica player and recorded several songs on the Mercury Records label. Her biggest seller was "I Felt a Little Teardrop" with "Detour" on the flip side. Already famous as Babe Didrikson, she married George Zaharias (1908–1984), a professional wrestler, in St. Louis, Missouri, on December 23, 1938. Thereafter, she was largely known as Babe Didrikson Zaharias or Babe Zaharias. The two met while playing golf. George Zaharias, a Greek American, was a native of Pueblo, Colorado. Called the "Crying Greek from Cripple Creek," Zaharias also did some part-time acting, appearing in the 1952 movie Pat and Mike. The Zahariases had no children. They were rebuffed by authorities when they sought to adopt

Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 – January 11, 1965) was an American professional baseball player. A first baseman, Pipp played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, and Cincinnati Reds between 1913 and 1928. After appearing in 12 games for the Tigers in 1913 and playing in the minor leagues in 1914, he was purchased by the Yankees before the 1915 season. They made him their starting first baseman. He and Home Run Baker led an improved Yankee lineup that led the league in home runs. He led the American League in home runs in 1916 and 1917. With Babe Ruth, Bob Meusel, Joe Dugan, and Waite Hoyt, the Yankees won three consecutive American League pennants from 1921 through 1923, and won the 1923 World Series. In 1925, he lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig, after which he finished his major league career with Cincinnati. Pipp is considered to be one of the best power hitters of the dead ball era. Pipp is now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrig's streak of 2,130 consecutive games. According to a popular legend, Pipp asked to sit due to a headache.

Playing in an era that favored slap hitters, Frank "Home Run" Baker manned the hot corner for Connie Mack's famed "100,000 Infield" in Philadelphia from 1911 through 1914. He led or tied for the league lead in home runs in each of those years, though he never hit more than 12 in a season. In the 1911 World Series, Baker's on successive days off Rube Marquard and Christy Mathewson earned him his nickname. The Maryland farm boy was a .307 lifetime hitter and batted .363 in six World Series. Elected 1955.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Mickey Cochrane batted .320 during his 13-year career and excelled behind the plate. He also possessed that special trait - a fierce competitive spirit - which gave him exceptional leadership qualities. "Black Mike" sparked the Philadelphia Athletics' pennant- winning teams in 1929, 1930 and 1931, hitting .331, .357 and .349, respectively. As player-manager for the Detroit Tigers from 1934 to 1937, he guided the team to the American League championship n 1934 and the World Series title in 1935. A beaning in 1937 ended his playing career. Elected 1947.

Signed in 1906 at age 18, Eddie Collins played 25 seasons in the major leagues - a 20th-century record for position players. In 10 seasons, he batter better than .340, helping earn membership in the exclusive 3,000 hit club. The fiery second baseman starred in the famous "100,000 infield" with the Philadelphia Athletics and also for the Chicago White Sox. The "choke-grip" batting style Collins used proved fruitful. An aggressive and confident second baseman, he also was an outstanding baserunner. Elected 1939.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

Known as "The Mechanical Man" for his remarkable consistency, Charlie Gehringer batted better than .300 in 13 seasons and collected more than 200 hits seven times. As New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez put it, "He's in a rut. He goes 2 for 5 on Opening Day and stays that way all season." An agile second baseman with quick hands, Gehringer led the league in assists and fielding percentage seven times each. Regarding his quiet reputation, the six-time All-Star said, "You can't talk your way into a batting championship." A cornerstone of three pennant-winning Tigers teams, he won the 1937 Most Valuable Player Award by batting .371. Elected 1949.

Rogers Hornsby hit for average and power, winning two Triple Crowns and seven batting titles during his 23-year major league career. His .424 average in 1924 remains the highest in the National League since 1901. Intense and demanding, Hornsby often wore out his welcome with clubs, despite two pennants a player-manager. At the start of 1935, Hornsby was one of only three players - long with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig - with 300 career home runs. His lifetime batting average of .358 remains the second-highest of all time.

Connie Mack won five World Series titles, a record nine American League pennants, and 3,731 games, nearly 1,00o more than any other manager in history. Still, "The Tall Tactician," is best remembered as a dignified leader who donned a business suit to dispense wisdom to a generation of players. "Your born with two strikes against you, so don't take a third one on your own," Mack was fond of stating to his clubs. Though his entrance to baseball came by playing catcher for 11 seasons, in 1901 Mack assumed control of the Philadelphia Athletics, the team he would lead for the next 50 years. Elected 1937.

Though slight in stature, Charles "Kid" Nichols was a giant among pitchers. In a 15-year career, Nichols - known for his velocity, curve and control - dominated late-19th century hitters, winning 361 games. During one stretch, he won at least 26 games for nine consecutive seasons. Nichols completed 532 of the 562 games he started. "You stayed in there and worked in those days," Nichols said. "My objective was to have the batter hit at the first one, and the second one and the third one. By that time, barring fouls, I figure he is either out or had made a hit." Elected 1949.

A symbol of durability and toughness, diminutive Ray Schalk was a defensive standout and an innovator at his position. Schalk is credited as one of the first catchers to back up plays at first and third base, and continuously caught 100-or-more games per season. A skilled receiver, he caught the 1920 Chicago White Sox staff, which featured four 20-game winners. He also was the first backstop to catch four no-hitters. Schalk retired after 18 seasons as owner of a slew of defensive records. He went on to manage, coach and scout for numerous professional and amateur baseball teams. Elected 1955.

The most celebrated defensive outfielder of the Dead Ball Era, Tris Speaker played a shallow center field, amassing a record 449 assists and mastering the unassisted double play. John Lardner wrote that Speaker was "as free and easy in the broad spaces of an outfield as a wild horse on a prairie." A terrific hitter with a .345 lifetime average, Speaker set the career record of 792 doubles and finished with 3,514 hits. A successful player-manager, he led the 1920 Cleveland Indians to the World Series championship. Elected 1937.

Clarence Arthur "Dazzy" Vance toiled in the minor leagues for a decade and didn't win a game in the majors until he was 31 years old. The most dominant pitcher of the 1920s, Vance used his blazing fastball to lead the National League in strikeouts for seven consecutive seasons. Teammate Johnny Frederick said that Vance "could throw a crème puff through a battleship." His 1924 season=, for which he won the MVP Award, featured the pitching Triple Crown; he led the league with a 28-6 record, 2.16 ERA and 262 strikeouts. Elected 1955.

Bobby Wallace began his career as a pitcher before moving to shortstop, where he starred for the St. Louis Browns for 15 seasons. A steady hitter, Wallace was best known for his defensed, leading the American League in fielding percentage two times and setting a record for most chances in one game (17). Credited with developing the "scoop and throw" method for getting throws to first base faster, he followed his playing career with stints as manager, coach, umpire and scout. "I loved every minute of it," Wallace said of his 60-year baseball career. Elected 1953.

Bobby Wallace began his career as a pitcher before moving to shortstop, where he starred for the St. Louis Browns for 15 seasons. A steady hitter, Wallace was best known for his defensed, leading the American League in fielding percentage two times and setting a record for most chances in one game (17). Credited with developing the "scoop and throw" method for getting throws to first base faster, he followed his playing career with stints as manager, coach, umpire and scout. "I loved every minute of it," Wallace said of his 60-year baseball career. Elected 1953.

"He was just as fast between his ears as he was with his feet." said sportswriter Joe Williams. "That's what made him harder to stop than a run in a silk stocking." Max Carey hustled on the bases, totaling 738 career steals, leading the National League 10 times during his 20-year career. Defensively, Carey led the league in putouts nine times and recorded 339 outfield assists. He batter better than .300 six times, amassing 2,665 career hits. In 1925, Carey hit .343 during the regular season and .458 in the World Series. Elected 1961.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

Joe Cronin was the first to work his way from the playing field to the league presidency. A lifetime .301 hitter with 515 career doubles, Cronin was selected as an American League All-Star seven times. At age 26, he won the 1933 pennant as a player-manager with Washington Senators before being trade to the Boston Red Sox following the 1934 season, where his roles included player, manager, general manager, treasurer and vice president. He served two terms as AL president, overseeing the league's expansion from eight to twelve teams. Hall of Fames slugger Ted Williams praised his former manager stating, "Whatever I am, I owe to Joe." Elected 1956.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

As famed sportswriter Dan Daniels once wrote, "Bill Dickey isn't just a catcher, he's a ball club." A key performer for the New York Yankees on eight American League pennant-winners and seven World Series champions, the expert handler of pitchers with the deadly accurate throwing arm was also a top hitter, batting better than .300 in 10 of his first 11 full seasons. Know for his durability, he set an AL record by catching a 100 or more games 13 years in a row. Dickey finished his 17-year career with a .313 batting average. Elected 1954.

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.

When Bob Feller said of his pitching; "I just reared back and let them go," he accurately described his blazing fastball. "Rapid Robert" set the standard for generations of future fireballers. During his 18-year career - spent entirely with the Cleveland Indians - Feller amassed 266 victories, leading the league in wins six times and strikeouts seven. After enlisting in the Navy in 1941, he missed nearly four full seasons to serve his country. As a Navy gun captain, Feller earned five campaign ribbons studded with eight battle stars. Feller authored three no-hitters and 12 one-hitter, winning 20 or more games six times. Elected 1962.

Like the original Roy Hobbs, Elmer Flick reported to the Philadelphia Phillies in the spring of 1898 with a bat he had turned on a lathe himself. Described by sportswriter Francis Richter as "one of the most promising youngsters the Phillies had ever had." Flick replaced injured Hall of Famer Sam Thompson in the outfield and remained in the majors for the next 13 seasons. In four full years with the Phillies, Flick hit .338. In nine seasons with the Cleveland Naps, the speedster let the American League in stolen bases twice, triples three times and retired with a .313 lifetime average. Elected 1963.

Known as the "Fordham Flash," Frankie Frisch jumped directly from Fordham University to the New York Giants and played o eight pennant winners in 19 seasons. A switch-hitter, Frisch compiled 11 straight .300 seasons and retired with numerous fielding records for second basemen. Recalling Frisch, writer Damon Runyon wrote, "Tell 'em most especially about the way Frisch played second base, some of center field and a slice of right field too." As player-manager (and later, manger) of the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch instilled the rollicking, all-out style of hard-nosed play that produced two World Series championships and prompted sportswriters to tab the Cardinals "The Gashouse Gang." Elected 1947.

One of three Hall of Famers to garner Most Valuable Awards at two different positions, (first base , 1935; outfield, 1940), Henry "Hank" Greenberg was one of the game's premier sluggers. Widely regarded as the first great Jewish ball player, Greenberg finished his career with 331 home runs, despite missing three full seasons and parts of two others while serving in the military. His big bat helped lead the Detroit Tigers to World Series titles in 1935 and 1945, batting .318 in four Fall Classics overall. Joe DiMaggio once said of Greenberg: "He was one of the truly great hitters, and when I first saw him at bat, he made my eyes pop out." Elected 1956.

Journalist Arthur Baer once noted, "Lefty Grove could throw a lamb past a wolf." Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove, arguably one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all time, was famous for his hard-headed, competitive nature. Connie Mack purchased him from the minor-league Baltimore Orioles for a then-record $100,600 in 1924, and Grimes pitche the Philadelphia Athletics to three straight AL pennants and two World Series titles from 1929 to 1931, going 19-15. He led the league in wins on four occasions, in winning percentage in five seasons, in strikeouts seven consecutive times, and in ERA a staggering nine times. Elected 1947.

Charles "Gabby" Hartnett excelled both behind the plate and at the plate, becoming the first backstop in history to slug 200 home runs and drive in 1,000 runs in a career. His catching prowess prompted pitcher Dizzy Dean to proclaim, "If I had that guy to pitch to all the time, I'd never lose a game." Hartnett, who spent 19 seasons with the Chicago Cubs - where he won four pennants - was named to the NL All-Star Game in the first six years the contest was held, starting behind the plate in 1934, 1936 and 1937. he also won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1935. Elected 1955.

Master of the screwball, left-handed "King Carl" Hubbell was one of the best pitchers of the 1930's. Unflappable on the mound Hubbell became a national sensation for striking out five straight Hall of Famers in the 1934 All-Star Game: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin. From 1929 to 1937, the New York Giants' "Meal Ticket" averaged 20 wins, led the club to three pennants and won the National League Most Valuable Player Award twice. Waite Hoyt claimed, "Hubbell is the greatest pitcher in the league. Elected 1947.

Tris Speaker once declared, "If I had the choice for any pitcher for a clutch game, the guy I'd pick would be Ted Lyons." Nearly every Sunday afternoon, Ted Lyons would take the mound for the Chicago White Sox, and the result was almost always the same; a victory.. Lyon, who won 260 games, abandoned his law school plans by signing with Chicago in 1923 and became a top draw for the club for 21 years. After a World War II stint in the Marines, Lyons returned to manage the Sox for three seasons. Elected 1955.

Joe McCarthy, the New York Yankees manager of the 1930s and early 1940s, finished his 24-year major league career with an all-time best winning percentage of .615 to go along with 2,125 wins. After winning one pennant with the Chicago Cubs, McCarthy won eight at the helm of the Yankees. Included in that were seven World Series championships, four of the consecutive, from 1936 to 1939. On six occasions, his teams won 100 or more games in a season. "I don't know where he learned all his psychology about ballplayers. He could handle almost anybody." claimed former Yankee outfielder Tommy Henrich. Elected 1957.

Known for his expertise of pitching and defense, Bill McKechnie became a highly successful manager after an 11-year playing career and was the first skipper to win pennants with three different National League clubs - the Pittsburgh Pirates (1925), St. Louis Cardinals (1928) and Cincinnati Reds (1939 and 1940). Former pitcher Johnny Vander Meer said, "He knew how to hold onto a one or two-run lead better than any other manager." In 1925 and 1940, "Deacon" led his clubs to World Series victories. He was also named Manager of the Year on two separate occasions, (1937 and 1940). Elected 1962.

Edgar C. "Sam" Rice could do wonderful things with a bat - like tallying 2,987 career hits. Longtime American League rival Ty Cobb said of Rice, "You couldn't appreciate Sam Rice enough unless you played against him." Rice's disputed catch in the 1925 World Series saved game 3 for the Washington Senators and remains one of baseball's most controversial plays. In a letter not to be opened until after his death, Rice wrote, in part, "I had a death grip on it. At no time did I lose possession of the ball." Elected 1963.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

One of the best line-drive hitters in history, Edd Roush swung a heavy bat and seldom struck out. His speed proved an asset in the field and on the basepaths. A shrewd businessman and a good baseball mind, Roush invested wisely and was independently wealthy by the time he retired. Contract squabbles often kept Roush from Spring Training, but he kept himself in such phenomenal shape year-round that manager Pat Moran once said, "All that fella has to do is wash his hands, adjust his cap and he's in shape to hit. Elected 1962.

Al Simmons grew up in a poor section of Milwaukee and was a classic case of local boy making good, playing parts of his first two professional seasons with the minor league Milwaukee Brewers. "Bucketfoot Al" was the consummate ballplayer - he could run, hit for power and average, and was an excellent fielder with a tremendous throwing arm. Paired with Jimmie Foxx on the Philadelphia Athletics, the two sluggers formed a dangerous 1-2 punch, leading the club to three straight appearances in the World Series (1929-1931). Simmons was a favorite of Connie Mack, who once said, "I wish I had nine players named Al Simmons." Elected 1953.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

Bill Terry referred to hitting as a business. With a lifetime .341 batting average - a modern National League record for left-handed batters - his business was a resounding success. The last player in the NL to top .400, Terry socked 254 hits in 1930, when he hit .401. An excellent fielder and team leader, he succeeded John McGraw as the New York Giants manager in 1932 and won three pennants and a World Series championship in the next six years. Elected 1954.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

Once described as, "170 pounds of scrap-iron, rawhide and guts," Zachariah Davis Wheat, was a model of consistency during a 19-year career, spent mostly with Brooklyn of the National League. Wheat's soft spoken demeanor belied a competitive fierceness on the diamond. Considered an intelligent ballplayer with impressive defensive skills, Wheat vexed his opponents with line-drive hitting, which netted 2,884 career hits. Beloved by the fans in Brooklyn, Wheat was remembered by Casey Stengel as "the only great ballplayer who was never booed." Elected 1959.

Sandaharu Oh, also known as Wang Chen-chih, is a retired Japanese-born Taiwanese baseball player and manager who played 22 seasons for the Yomiun Giants in Nippon Professional Baseball from 1959 to 1980. Oh holds the world lifetime home run record, having hit 868 home runs during his professional career. He established many NPB batting records, including RBI, slugging percentage, bases on balls, and on-base plus slugging in 1977. Oh became the first recipient of the People's Honour Award. He was inducted into the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers. During his career as a center, Abdul-Jabbar was a record six-time NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP), a record 19-time NBA All-Star, a 15-time All-NBA selection, and an 11-time NBA All-Defensive Team member. A member of six NBA championship teams as a player and two more as an assistant coach, Abdul-Jabbar twice was voted NBA Finals MVP. In 1996, he was honored as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. NBA coach Pat Riley and players Isiah Thomas and Julius Erving have called him the greatest basketball player of all time. After winning 71 consecutive basketball games on his high school team in New York City, Alcindor was recruited by Jerry Norman, the assistant coach of UCLA, where he played for coach John Wooden[7] on three consecutive national championship teams and was a record three-time MVP of the NCAA Tournament. Drafted with the first overall pick by the one-season-old Bucks franchise in the 1969 NBA draft, Alcindor spent six seasons in Milwaukee. After leading the Bucks to its first NBA championship at age 24 in 1971, he took the Muslim name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Using his trademark "skyhook" shot, he established himself as one of the league's top scorers. In 1975, he was traded to the Lakers, with whom he played the final 14 seasons of his career and won five additional NBA championships. Abdul-Jabbar's contributions were a key component in the "Showtime" era of Lakers basketball. Over his 20-year NBA career, his teams succeeded in making the playoffs 18 times and got past the first round 14 times; his teams reached the NBA Finals on 10 occasions. At the time of his retirement at age 42 in 1989, Abdul-Jabbar was the NBA's all-time leader in points scored (38,387), games played (1,560), minutes played (57,446), field goals made (15,837), field goal attempts (28,307), blocked shots (3,189), defensive rebounds (9,394), career wins (1,074), and personal fouls (4,657). He remains the all-time leader in points scored and career wins. He is ranked third all-time in both rebounds and blocked shots. In 2007, ESPN voted him the greatest center of all time, in 2008, they named him the "greatest player in college basketball history", and in 2016, they named him the second best player in NBA history (behind Michael Jordan) Abdul-Jabbar has also been an actor, a basketball coach, and a best-selling author. In 2012, he was selected by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to be a U.S. global cultural ambassador. In 2016, President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Edmundo "Sandy" Amorós Isasi (January 30, 1930 – June 27, 1992) was a Cuban left fielder in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers and Detroit Tigers. Amorós was born in Havana. He both batted and threw left-handed. Dodgers scout Al Campanis signed him in 1951, struck by the small man's speed. Sandy played for the New York Cubans of the Negro Leagues in 1950. Amorós, nicknamed for his resemblance to boxing champ Sandy Saddler, had a brief but hugely underrated period of his Major League career. From 1954–57, his value to the Brooklyn Dodgers as a hitter was remarkable. This was not understood at the time partly because Amorós was overshadowed by Dodgers outfield stars like Duke Snider, partly because of Amorós's skin color, personality and nation of origin. But mostly he was underrated because the concept of On Base Percentage (OBP) was not yet a part of player evaluations. Amorós's batting averages were mediocre but, because he drew many walks, his on base percentages between 1954 and 1957 were .353, .347, .385 and .399. The defining moment of Amorós' career with the Brooklyn Dodgers was one of the memorable events in World Series history. It was the sixth inning of the decisive Game 7 of the 1955 World Series. The Dodgers had never won a World Series and were now trying to hold a 2–0 lead against their perennial rivals, the New York Yankees. The left-handed Amorós came into the game that inning as a defensive replacement, as the right-handed throwing Jim Gilliam moved from left field to second base in place of Don Zimmer. The first two batters in the inning reached base and Yogi Berra came to the plate. Berra, notorious for swinging at pitches outside the strike zone, hit an opposite-field shot toward the left field corner that looked to be a sure double, as the Brooklyn outfield had just shifted to the right. Amorós seemingly came ou of nowhere, extended his gloved right hand to catch the ball and immediately skidded to a halt to avoid crashing into the fence near Yankee Stadium's 301 distance marker in the left field corner. He then threw to the relay man, shortstop Pee Wee Reese, who in turn threw to first baseman Gil Hodges, doubling Gil McDougald off first; Hank Bauer grounded out to end the inning.

Anthony Richard Conigliaro (January 7, 1945 – February 24, 1990), nicknamed "Tony C" and "Conig",[1][2] was a Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the Boston Red Sox (1964–67, 1969–1970, 1975) and California Angels (1971). During the Red Sox "Impossible Dream" season of 1967, he was hit in the face by a pitch that caused a severe eye injury and derailed his career. Though he would make a comeback from the injury, his career was not the same afterwards. Conigliaro was signed by the Red Sox in 1962, at the age of 17. In 1963, he batted .363 with 24 home runs playing for the Wellsville Red Sox in the New York–Penn League, after which he was called up to the majors. During his 1964 rookie season, Conigliaro batted .290 with 24 home runs and 52 RBI in 111 games, but broke his arm and his toes in August. In his first at-bat in Fenway Park, Conigliaro hit a towering home run in the second inning against the White Sox. In his sophomore season in 1965, Conigliaro led the league in home runs (32), becoming the youngest home run champion in American League history. He was selected for the All-Star Game in 1967. In that season, at age 22, he not only reached a career total of 100 home runs, but attained that milestone at the youngest age for an American League player. On August 18, 1967, the Red Sox were playing the California Angels at Fenway Park. Conigliaro, batting against Jack Hamilton, was hit by a pitch on his left cheekbone and was carried off the field on a stretcher. He sustained a linear fracture of the left cheekbone and a dislocated jaw with severe damage to his left retina. The batting helmet he was wearing did not have the protective ear-flap that has since become standard. A year and a half later, Conigliaro made a remarkable return, hitting 20 homers with 82 RBI in 141 games, earning Comeback Player of the Year honors. In 1970, he reached career-high numbers in HRs (36) and RBI (116). That season he and his brother Billy formed two-thirds of the Red Sox outfield. After a stint with the Angels in 1971, he returned to the Red Sox briefly in 1975 as a designated hitter, but was forced to retire because his eyesight had been permanently damaged. Conigliaro batted .267, with 162 home runs and 501 RBI during his 802-game Red Sox career. With the Angels, he hit .222 with 4 home runs and 15 RBI in 74 games. He holds the MLB record for most home runs (24) hit by a teenage player. He is the second-youngest player to hit his 100th homer (after Mel Ott), and the youngest American League player to do so.

Dominic Paul DiMaggio (February 12, 1917 – May 8, 2009), nicknamed "The Little Professor", was an American Major League Baseball center fielder. He played his entire 11-year baseball career for the Boston Red Sox (1940–1953). He was the youngest of three brothers who each became major league center fielders, the others being Joe and Vince. An effective leadoff hitter, he batted .300 four times and led the American League in runs twice and in triples and stolen bases once each. He also led AL center fielders in assists three times and in putouts and double plays twice each; he tied a league record by recording 400 putouts four times, and his 1948 totals of 503 putouts and 526 total chances stood as AL records for nearly thirty years. His 1338 games in center field ranked eighth in AL history when he retired. His 34-game hitting streak in 1949 remains a Boston club record. He was the youngest of three brothers who each became major league center fielders: Joe was a star with the rival New York Yankees, and Vince played for five National League teams. The youngest of nine children born to Sicilian immigrants, Dom's small stature (5'9") and eyeglasses earned him the nickname "The Little Professor."

Maurice Charles "Mickey" Harris (January 30, 1917 – April 15, 1971) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1940–41, 1946–49), Washington Senators (1949–52) and Cleveland Indians (1952). Harris was born in New York City. He batted and threw left-handed. Though plagued by chronic arm problems, Harris helped the Boston Red Sox to win the 1946 American League pennant en route to the 1946 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. Harris debuted with the Red Sox in 1940. He joined the starting rotation in 1941, along with Dick Newsome, Charlie Wagner, Lefty Grove and Joe Dobson. Harris responded with a 3.25 ERA and 111 strikeouts (8th and 5th in the AL, respectively), and his 8–14 record could have been even better with reasonable run support. After the season, he was drafted into the Army. After being out for four years, Harris compiled a 17–9 record in 1946, as the Red Sox ran away with the pennant. In May, Harris posted eight consecutive victories, including two in relief in two days. He was named to the AL All-Star team in the same season. After that, Harris increased arm troubles and was traded to the Senators in the 1949 midseason. In 1950 Harris led the AL pitchers in saves (15), relief appearances (53) and games finished (53). He went to Cleveland in 1952, his last season in the majors. In a nine-season career, Harris posted a 59–71 record with 534 strikeouts and a 4.18 ERA in 1050.0 innings pitched.

Gordon Howe OC (March 31, 1928 – June 10, 2016) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. From 1946 to 1980, he played twenty-six seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) and six seasons in the World Hockey Association (WHA); his first 25 seasons were spent with the Detroit Red Wings. Nicknamed Mr. Hockey, Howe is often considered the most complete player to ever play the game and one of the greatest of all time. A 23-time NHL All-Star, he held many of the sport's career scoring records until they were broken in the 1980s by Wayne Gretzky, who himself has been a major champion of Howe's legacy. He continues to hold NHL records for most games and seasons played. In 2017, Howe was named one of the "100 Greatest NHL Players". owe made his NHL debut with the Red Wings in 1946. He won the Art Ross Trophy for leading the league in scoring each year from 1950–51 to 1953–54, then again in 1956-57 and 1962–63, for a total of six times, which is the second most in NHL history. He led the NHL in goal scoring four times. He ranked among the top ten in NHL scoring for 21 consecutive years and set an NHL record for points in a season (95) in 1953, a record which was broken six years later. He won the Stanley Cup with the Red Wings four times and won six Hart Trophies as the NHL's most valuable player. He also led the NHL in playoff points six times. Howe retired for the first time in 1971 and was immediately inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame that same year. He was then inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame the next year, but came back two years later to join his sons Mark and Marty on the Houston Aeros of the WHA. Although in his mid-40s, he scored over 100 points twice in six years, won two straight Avco World Trophies (1974 and 1975) and was named most valuable player in 1974. He made a brief return to the NHL in 1979–80, playing one season with the Hartford Whalers, then retired at age 52. His involvement with the WHA was central to their brief pre-NHL merger success, forcing the NHL to recruit European talent and expand to new markets. Howe was most famous for his scoring prowess, physical strength and career longevity, and redefined the ideal qualities of a forward. He is the only player to have competed in the NHL in five different decades (1940s through 1980s). He became the namesake of the "Gordie Howe hat trick": a goal, an assist and a fight in the same game, though he only recorded two such games in his career. He was the inaugural recipient of the NHL Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008.

James Robert Hughes (March 21, 1923 – August 13, 2001) was an American professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of six seasons (1952–57) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox. For his career, he compiled a 15–13 record in 172 appearances, all but one as a relief pitcher, with a 3.83 earned run average and 165 strikeouts. He was a member of four National League pennant-winning Dodgers teams (1952, 1953, 1955 and 1956), though he participated in only the 1953 World Series.

Clayton Edward Kershaw is a professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball. A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average and walks and hits per inning pitched average are the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. Kershaw has a career hits allowed per nine innings pitched average of 6.61 - the second lowest in MLB history - along with three Cy Young Awards and the 2014 National League MVP Award. He has been described throughout the majority of his career as the best pitcher in baseball.

Robert Harold "Bob" Klinger (June 4, 1908 – August 19, 1977) was a professional baseball player who was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball over parts of eight seasons from 1938 through 1947. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Boston Red Sox. In 265 career appearances he compiled a 66–61 record along with 23 saves, with a 3.68 earned run average and 357 strikeouts. His cousin Charlie Hollocher was also a Major League Baseball player. Two days after being released by Pittsburgh, Klinger was signed by Boston,[3] where he served primarily as a relief pitcher. During the 1946 regular season, he made 28 appearances with just 1 start – a no decision in his first appearance – and had a league-leading 9 saves, with a 3–2 record and a 2.37 ERA. That year, the Red Sox ran away with the American League crown by twelve games over the Detroit Tigers with a 104–50 record, and were heavy favorites in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, however the series went the full seven games. In game seven, Klinger was involved in a famous play known as the "mad dash". The Red Sox had tied the score at 3–3 in the top half of the eighth inning, and Klinger came in to pitch the bottom of the eighth – starter Dave Ferriss had been replaced by reliever Joe Dobson in the fifth inning, and Dobson had been lifted for pinch hitter George Metkovich during the Red Sox rally in the eighth.[4] Enos Slaughter led off the bottom half of the inning with a single off of Klinger. After a failed bunt attempt by Whitey Kurowski and a flyout to left field by Del Rice, Slaughter found himself still on first base with two outs. With outfielder Harry Walker at the plate with a two balls and one strike count, the Cardinals called for a hit and run. With Slaughter running, Walker lined Klinger's pitch to left-center field. Leon Culberson fielded the ball, and threw a relay to shortstop Johnny Pesky. Slaughter rounded third base heading for home, running through the stop sign from his third base coach. What exactly happened when Pesky turned around is still a matter of contention, but catcher Roy Partee caught a delayed throw up the line, allowing Slaughter to score what proved to be the winning run. Klinger issued an intentional walk to the next batter, then was relieved by Earl Johnson who got a ground out to retire the Cardinals. When the Red Sox were unable to score in the top of the ninth (despite their first two batters getting on base), Klinger was charged with the loss. It was his only appearance in the series – 5 batters faced, 2/3 innings pitched, and 1 earned run – and the only postseason series of his career. During the 1947 season, Klinger again made 28 appearances; he registered 5 saves, and had a 1–1 record with a 3.86 ERA. He was released during the final week of the season, drawing a close to his MLB career. In his two seasons with Boston he had 14 saves, a record of 4–3, and a 3.00 ERA while appearing in 56 games (55 of them in relief) and

Raymond Lewis Lankford (born June 5, 1967) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the St. Louis Cardinals and San Diego Padres from 1990 to 2004. He was known for his combination of power, speed, and defensive prowess. Lankford made his major league debut with St. Louis in August 1990, and soon after took over the center field position previously occupied by former National League Most Valuable Player Willie McGee. He started his career as primarily a leadoff man, where his speed and plate discipline made him a potent force. In his first full season in 1991, he led the league with 15 triples, stole 44 bases, and scored 83 runs, earning him a third-place finish in the Rookie of the Year voting. On September 15, 1991, he accomplished the rare feat of hitting for the cycle, becoming the first Cardinal rookie ever to do so. In 1992, he began to hit for more power, and posted a breakout season with a .293 batting average, 20 home runs, and 42 stolen bases. This season established Lankford as one of the best all-around outfielders in the game. He eventually moved down in the batting order to take further advantage of his power hitting ability. Lankford posted five seasons of 20 home runs and 20 stolen bases with the Cardinals (1992, 1995–1998), making him the only player in franchise history to accomplish the feat more than once. He also was an impressive fielder, posting a 2.90 range factor in 1992 and committing only one error in 1996. In the latter season, he led the league with a fielding percentage of .997 but was still not awarded a Gold Glove.

John Paul Lazor (September 9, 1912 – December 9, 2002) was a backup outfielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1943 through 1946 for the Boston Red Sox (1943–1946). Lazor provided four years of good services for the Red Sox while left fielder Ted Williams and center fielder Dom DiMaggio were in the military service. His most productive season came in 1945, when he posted career-highs in games played (101), batting average (.310), runs scored (35), runs batted in (45), doubles (19) and home runs (5). In a four-season career, Lazor was a .263 hitter with six home runs and 62 RBI in 224 games. He finished his professional career with the Portland Beavers of the Pacific Coast League, playing for them 280 games from 1947 to 1949. Lazor died in Renton, Washington at the age of 90. Until the Red Sox signed J.T. Snow, who wore 84 in 2006, Lazor had worn the highest number in Red Sox history. Lazor previously had worn number 82 in 1943. In a December 2001 interview, Lazor said he did not know why he wore the number and claimed he thought he wore the number 29.[3] Snow was later surpassed by Alfredo Aceves in 2011 for highest number worn in Red Sox history (Aceves wore number 91).

Colonel Buster Mills (September 16, 1908 – December 1, 1991) was an American outfielder, coach, scout and interim manager in Major League Baseball. A native of Ranger, Texas. His father, Elvis, owned a general store in Ranger, Texas. Elvis and Lucy Mills gave their fourth child the unusual first name of Colonel, after the rank of either Elvis's best friend or a Civil War great-uncle. (During World War II, he enjoyed introducing himself to officers as "Colonel Mills".) He lettered in football, basketball, track and baseball at the University of Oklahoma and was named all-Big Six quarterback. He graduated with a degree in geology in 1931. A St. Louis Cardinals scout saw him hit for the cycle (including two doubles) in a baseball game against Washington University in St. Louis. However, when he asked for the player's name, he was told it was Wahl. The scout had to leave, but left a message to sign the (wrong) player. Mills signed with Cleveland, but ended up in the extensive St. Louis Cardinals farm system during the early 1930s, receiving a 29-game trial with the 1934 "Gashouse Gang" Cardinals and then a 17-game tryout with the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers. He played the rest of his MLB career in the American League for the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians (1937–40; 1942; 1946). Overall, he played in 415 games, and compiled a lifetime batting average of .287 with 14 home runs and 163 runs batted in. In 1940, Mills batted .397 in 63 at bats for the Yankees,[2] largely as a pinch hitter. After military service in World War II, Mills became a coach for the Indians (1946), Chicago White Sox (1947–50), Cincinnati Redlegs (1953) and Red Sox (1954) and managed in minor league baseball. He was the interim manager of the 1953 Redlegs, finishing the unexpired term of Rogers Hornsby, who resigned late in the season. Mills' record in Cincinnati was 4–4 (.500). After his coaching career, Mills spent many seasons as a scout for the Kansas City Athletics, then the Yankees.

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, KBE ( born 23 October 1940), known as Pelé ([pe'l?]), is a Brazilian retired professional footballer who played as a forward. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time. In 1999, he was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), and was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the Century award. That same year, Pelé was elected Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee. According to the IFFHS, Pelé is the most successful domestic league goal-scorer in football history scoring 650 goals in 694 League matches, and in total 1281 goals in 1363 games, which included unofficial friendlies and is a Guinness World Record. During his playing days, Pelé was for a period the best-paid athlete in the world. Pelé began playing for Santos at age 15 and the Brazil national team at 16. During his international career, he won three FIFA World Cups: 1958, 1962 and 1970, being the only player ever to do so. Pelé is the all-time leading goalscorer for Brazil with 77 goals in 92 games. At club level he is the record goalscorer for Santos, and led them to the 1962 and 1963 Copa Libertadores. Known for connecting the phrase "The Beautiful Game" with football, Pelé's "electrifying play and penchant for spectacular goals" made him a star around the world, and his teams toured internationally in order to take full advantage of his popularity. Since retiring in 1977, Pelé has been a worldwide ambassador for football and has made many acting and commercial ventures. In 2010, he was named the Honorary President of the New York Cosmos. Averaging almost a goal per game throughout his career, Pelé was adept at striking the ball with either foot in addition to anticipating his opponents' movements on the field. While predominantly a striker, he could also drop deep and take on a playmaking role, providing assists with his vision and passing ability, and he would also use his dribbling skills to go past opponents. In Brazil, he is hailed as a national hero for his accomplishments in football and for his outspoken support of policies that improve the social conditions of the poor. Throughout his career and in his retirement, Pelé received several individual and team awards for his performance in the field, his record-breaking achievements, and legacy in the sport.

John Michael Pesky (born John Michael Paveskovich; February 27, 1919 – August 13, 2012), nicknamed "The Needle" and "Mr. Red Sox", was an American professional baseball player, manager and coach. He was a shortstop and third baseman during a ten-year major league playing career, appearing in 1,270 games played in 1942 and from 1946 to 1954 for three teams. He missed the 1943–45 seasons while serving in World War II. Pesky was associated with the Boston Red Sox for 61 of his 73 years in baseball—from 1940 through June 3, 1952, 1961 through 1964, and from 1969 until his death. Pesky also managed the Red Sox from 1963 to 1964, and in September 1980. A left-handed hitter who threw right-handed, Pesky was a tough man for pitchers to strike out. He was the first American League (AL) player to score 6 runs in a 9 inning game. As a hitter, he specialized in getting on base, leading the AL in base hits three times—his first three seasons in the majors, in which he collected over 200 hits each year—and was among the top ten in on-base percentage six times while batting .307 in 4,745 at bats as a major leaguer. He was also an excellent bunter who led the league in sacrifice hits in 1942. He was a teammate and close friend of Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr and Dom DiMaggio, as chronicled in The Teammates by David Halberstam.

Glen David "Rip" Russell (January 26, 1915 – September 26, 1976) was an infielder in Major League Baseball, playing mainly as a first baseman for two different teams between the 1939 and 1947 seasons. He was born in Los Angeles, California. Basically a line-drive hitter and a good fielding replacement, Russell entered the majors in 1939 with the Chicago Cubs, playing for them four years (1939–42) before joining the Boston Red Sox (1946–47). His most productive season came during his rookie year, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.273), home runs (9), runs (55), hits (148), extra-base hits (38), RBI (79) and games played (143). In a six-season career, Russell was a .245 hitter (344-for-1402) with 29 home runs and 192 RBI in 425 games, including 133 runs, 52 doubles, eight triples and four stolen bases.

Dominic Joseph "Mike" Ryba (June 9, 1903 – December 13, 1971) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. A native of De Lancey, Pennsylvania, he attended Saint Francis University, Loretto, Pennsylvania.[1] He was a right-hander and played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1935–1938) and Boston Red Sox (1941–1946). In 1946, at the age of 43, he was the second-oldest player to appear in an American League game that season. Ryba was usually used in relief during his ten-year major league career. Ryba was appeared in 10 career games as a catcher. While in the minor leagues, he played all nine positions at various points. He made his major league debut on September 22, 1935 against the Cincinnati Reds in game 1 of a doubleheader at Sportsman's Park. He pitched seven innings of two-hit relief and was the winning pitcher in the 14–4 game. He also had two hits and three runs batted in to help his cause. In four seasons with St. Louis he won 16 games, lost 9, and had an ERA of 4.39. On September 5, 1940 he was traded to the Boston Red Sox for pitcher Al Brazle. Ryba was 37 years old and had not pitched in the big leagues for two years, but his best seasons were ahead of him. In six years with the Red Sox he won 36 games, lost 25, saved 16, and had an ERA of 3.42. Boston won the pennant in his last season, and Ryba appeared in Game # 4 of the 1946 World Series, giving up one earned run and allowing two inherited runners to score in 2/3 of an inning. Ryba caught both games of a home doubleheader against the Cleveland Indians on July 19, 1942. Ryba finished in his league's top ten for games finished 5 times, games pitched 3 times, saves 2 times, and winning percentage 1 time. Career totals for 250 games (240 as a pitcher) include a record of 52–34 (.605), 36 games started, 16 complete games, 2 shutouts, 132 games finished, and 16 saves. He allowed 319 earned runs in 783.2 innings pitched for an ERA of 3.66. He wielded a strong bat for a pitcher, hitting .235 (58-for-247) with 24 RBI. He was strong defensively as well, making just seven errors as a pitcher and none as a catcher.

James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 – December 31, 1980) was an American baseball pitcher who played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1915 to 1927. He batted and threw right-handed and served primarily as a starting pitcher. An adept batsman during his 15 year career, Shawkey compiled a .214 batting average (225-for-1049) with 90 runs, 3 home runs and 95 RBI. From 1920-1924, he drove in 59 runs for the New York Yankees. In 8 World Series games, he hit .267 (4-for-15) with 2 RBI. In 1970, Shawkey was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in Brookville, Pennsylvania. During the 1976 opening day festivities for the renovated Yankee Stadium, Shawkey threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

Harold Edward Wagner (July 2, 1915 – August 4, 1979) was an American professional baseball player who was a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1937 to 1949, playing a total of 672 games for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, and Philadelphia Phillies. Born in East Riverton, New Jersey, a suburb of Philadelphia. Altogether, Wagner hit for a .248 average with 15 home runs and 228 RBI, and had a .981 fielding percentage, during his major league career. Arriving in trade from the Athletics, Wagner played his first game with Boston on May 10, 1944, and received steady playing time in a platoon with the right-handed hitting Roy Partee. During June, for example, Wagner caught 11 complete games and appeared in 3 others, while Partee caught 14 complete games and appeared in 1 other. Wagner hit especially well during July and August, raising his average from .274 on June 30, to .295 on July 30, to .330 on August 27. But with World War II still ongoing, Wagner was called to serve, and on August 28 he joined the US Army. He missed the remainder of the 1944 season, and all of the 1945 season, due to his military service. After the conclusion of the war, Wagner was released from the Army in October 1945. Wagner was the Red Sox' number one catcher during 1946, catching 102 complete games of Boston's 154 game schedule, while the team broke a 28-year pennant drought by capturing the American League championship by 12 games over the Detroit Tigers. Although he batted only .230 for the season, he had career highs of 6 home runs and 52 RBI, and was selected to the 1946 All-Star Game, flying out in his one at bat as a substitute catcher during the game.[8] Wagner appeared in five games of the 1946 World Series, but went hitless in 13 at bats against the St. Louis Cardinals, who defeated Boston in seven games. Early in the 1947 season, the Red Sox traded Wagner to the Tigers for fellow catcher Birdie Tebbetts, a native New Englander who went on to have 3½ stellar seasons for Boston. At the time of the trade, May 20, neither catcher was hitting very well – .231 for Wagner, and .094 for Tebbetts. Their managers felt a change in home ballpark might benefit both players,[2] which turned out to be accurate, as Wagner hit .288 for Detroit over the remainder of the season, while Tebbetts hit .299 for Boston. Overall, Wagner played in 204 games during parts of three seasons with Boston, batting .264 with 7 home runs and 96 RBI.

James Alger Wilson (February 20, 1922 – September 2, 1986) was an American professional baseball pitcher, scout and front-office executive. Although he was well-traveled as a player and compiled a career winning percentage of only .491 in 175 decisions, he threw the first no-hit, no-run game in Milwaukee's Major League history[1] and was a three-time (1954–56) All-Star who represented both the National and American leagues. During his front office career he served as the third general manager in the franchise history of the Milwaukee Brewers. Wilson pitched in all or part of 12 seasons (1945–46; 1948–49; 1951–58) for five Major League franchises and six different cities: the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns/Baltimore Orioles, Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Braves/Milwaukee Braves and Chicago White Sox. He began his pro career during World War II in 1943 in the Red Sox' farm system and in his second year, 1944, he won 19 games with the top-level Louisville Colonels of the American Association. He made the 1945 Red Sox' roster coming out of spring training and started 21 games for them during the season's first four months. In his 21st start, on August 9 at Briggs Stadium, Wilson worked into the tenth inning of a 3–3 game. With one out, Detroit Tigers' slugger Hank Greenberg hit a line drive back through the box that struck Wilson in the head, fracturing his skull and sending him to Henry Ford Hospital. The injury sidelined Wilson for the rest of the campaign[3] and he would pitch only one more game for the Red Sox, on April 23, 1946. Wilson returned to Louisville for the balance of 1946 and all of 1947, then was included in a blockbuster trade to the Browns that yielded slugging shortstop Vern Stephens and starting pitcher Jack Kramer. But 1948 and 1949 saw Wilson bounce among four organizations—the Browns, Cleveland Indians, Tigers and Athletics—and make ineffective appearances in six total big-league games for the Browns and A's. Finally, in 1950, he was acquired by the Triple-A Seattle Rainiers, managed by Paul Richards. Wilson won 24 games (losing 11) for a sixth-place team and led the Pacific Coast League in strikeouts. His contract was purchased by the Boston Braves at season's end, and Wilson returned to the Major Leagues for good. Wilson's first All-Star season came in 1954 for the Milwaukee Braves; they had moved from Boston in March 1953. He no-hit the Philadelphia Phillies, 2–0 at Milwaukee County Stadium on June 12 of that season. The 32-year-old right-hander beat future Hall of Famer Robin Roberts in the one-hour and 43-minute contest. Wilson issued two bases on balls (both to Phillies' catcher Smoky Burgess) and struck out six.[4] The no-hitter was the first in the Braves' Milwaukee history.[1] Wilson was named an All-Star in the midst of an 8–2 season in 27 games pitched with three other complete game shutouts for the contending Braves. But he did not get into the 1954 Midsummer classic, an 11–9 loss for his National League squad

Tharon Leslie "Pat" Collins (September 13, 1896 – May 20, 1960) was an American baseball catcher who played ten seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees and Boston Braves from 1919 to 1929. Collins batted and threw right-handed and also played five games at first base. Collins played minor league baseball for the Joplin Miners until 1919, when he signed with the Browns. After spending six seasons with the organization, Collins spent a one-year sojourn in the minor leagues before he was traded to the Yankees, where he spent the next three years and played in the famous 1927 Murderers' Row lineup. At the conclusion of the 1928 season, he was traded to the Braves, with whom he played his last major league game on May 23, 1929. A two-time World Series champion, he is famous for being the only major league player to pinch hit and pinch run in the same game.

Tharon Leslie "Pat" Collins (September 13, 1896 – May 20, 1960) was an American baseball catcher who played ten seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees and Boston Braves from 1919 to 1929. Collins batted and threw right-handed and also played five games at first base. Collins played minor league baseball for the Joplin Miners until 1919, when he signed with the Browns. After spending six seasons with the organization, Collins spent a one-year sojourn in the minor leagues before he was traded to the Yankees, where he spent the next three years and played in the famous 1927 Murderers' Row lineup. At the conclusion of the 1928 season, he was traded to the Braves, with whom he played his last major league game on May 23, 1929. A two-time World Series champion, he is famous for being the only major league player to pinch hit and pinch run in the same game.

The '55 Pirates would finish the season in last place in the National League. But things were looking good as a young player named Roberto Clemente would join the team on April 17th. With Clemente on the roster, they would be 5 years away from a World Series victory! Elected 1973.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

Allen Davis (July 4, 1929 – October 8, 2011) was an American football coach and executive. He was the principal owner and general manager of the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL) for 39 years, from 1972 until his death in 2011. Prior to becoming the principal owner of the Raiders, he served as the team's head coach from 1963 to 1965 and part owner from 1966 to 1971, assuming both positions while the Raiders were part of the American Football League (AFL). He also served as the commissioner of the AFL in 1966.Known for his motto "Just win, baby", the Raiders became one of the NFL's most successful and popular teams under Davis' management. Although the franchise would enter a period of decline in his final years, the Raiders would enjoy many successes during the 1970s and 1980s, and won three Super Bowl titles. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1992. Davis was active in civil rights, refusing to allow the Raiders to play in any city where black and white players had to stay in separate hotels. He was the first NFL owner to hire an African American head coach and a female chief executive. He was also the second NFL owner to hire a Latino head coach (Tom Flores). He remains the only executive in NFL history to be an assistant coach, head coach, general manager, commissioner, and owner.

John Joseph Doyle (October 25, 1869 – December 31, 1958) was an Irish-American first baseman in Major League Baseball whose career spanned 17 seasons, mainly in the National League. He was born in Killorglin, Ireland, and emigrated to the U.S. when he was a child, his family settling in Holyoke, Massachusetts. After attending Fordham University, he embarked on a baseball career that would last 70 years. He made his first appearance at the major league level by signing and playing two years for the Columbus Solons of the American Association. Doyle would play for ten clubs from 1889 to 1905, batting .299 in 1,569 games with 518 stolen bases. He began as a catcher–outfielder and became a first baseman in 1894. His best years were in 1894, when he batted .367 for the New York Giants, and in 1897, when he hit .354 with 62 stolen bases for the Baltimore Orioles. He is credited with being the first pinch-hitter in pro ball, with Cleveland at Brooklyn on June 7, 1892. Patsy Tebeau was the manager and Doyle came through with a game-winning single. For the 1894 season, he took over the everyday duties at first base and became team captain. Manager John Montgomery Ward not only make the decision to replace his former teammate and friend Roger Connor, but released him as well. Connor was a very popular player, and this decision drew the ire and scrutiny from the fans and media alike. Ward defended his decision, and claimed the move came down to the fact that he liked Doyle's playing style, describing him as a hustler. Replacing Connor at first base proved worth the risk as Jack batted .367 that season, and he totaled 100 runs batted in, and stole 42 bases. Because of his aggressive playing style, Doyle was known as "Dirty Jack", often feuding with umpires, fans, opposing players, and even, at times, his own teammates. On one occasion, in Cincinnati on July 4, 1900, while in the 3rd inning of the second game of a doubleheader, Doyle slugged umpire Bob Emslie after being called out on a steal attempt. Fans jumped from the stands as the two got into it, and players finally separated the two fighters. Two policemen chased the fans back into the stands and then arrested and fined Doyle.[2] On July 1, 1901, when he was being harassed by a Polo Grounds fan, he jumped into the stands and hit him once with his left hand, reinjuring it after having broken it several weeks earlier. He carried on a lengthy feud with John McGraw that started when they were teammates at Baltimore. McGraw, of course, had to have the last word. In 1902, McGraw was appointed manager of the Giants, and his first act was to release Doyle, even though he was batting .301 and fielding .991 at the time. Even with these seemingly out-of-control traits, Doyle was deemed a natural leader and was selected as team captain in New York, Brooklyn and Chicago, and served as an interim manager for the Giants in 1895 and Washington Senators in 1898.

John Joseph Doyle (October 25, 1869 – December 31, 1958) was an Irish-American first baseman in Major League Baseball whose career spanned 17 seasons, mainly in the National League. He was born in Killorglin, Ireland, and emigrated to the U.S. when he was a child, his family settling in Holyoke, Massachusetts. After attending Fordham University, he embarked on a baseball career that would last 70 years. He made his first appearance at the major league level by signing and playing two years for the Columbus Solons of the American Association. Doyle would play for ten clubs from 1889 to 1905, batting .299 in 1,569 games with 518 stolen bases. He began as a catcher–outfielder and became a first baseman in 1894. His best years were in 1894, when he batted .367 for the New York Giants, and in 1897, when he hit .354 with 62 stolen bases for the Baltimore Orioles. He is credited with being the first pinch-hitter in pro ball, with Cleveland at Brooklyn on June 7, 1892. Patsy Tebeau was the manager and Doyle came through with a game-winning single. For the 1894 season, he took over the everyday duties at first base and became team captain. Manager John Montgomery Ward not only make the decision to replace his former teammate and friend Roger Connor, but released him as well. Connor was a very popular player, and this decision drew the ire and scrutiny from the fans and media alike. Ward defended his decision, and claimed the move came down to the fact that he liked Doyle's playing style, describing him as a hustler. Replacing Connor at first base proved worth the risk as Jack batted .367 that season, and he totaled 100 runs batted in, and stole 42 bases. Because of his aggressive playing style, Doyle was known as "Dirty Jack", often feuding with umpires, fans, opposing players, and even, at times, his own teammates. On one occasion, in Cincinnati on July 4, 1900, while in the 3rd inning of the second game of a doubleheader, Doyle slugged umpire Bob Emslie after being called out on a steal attempt. Fans jumped from the stands as the two got into it, and players finally separated the two fighters. Two policemen chased the fans back into the stands and then arrested and fined Doyle.[2] On July 1, 1901, when he was being harassed by a Polo Grounds fan, he jumped into the stands and hit him once with his left hand, reinjuring it after having broken it several weeks earlier. He carried on a lengthy feud with John McGraw that started when they were teammates at Baltimore. McGraw, of course, had to have the last word. In 1902, McGraw was appointed manager of the Giants, and his first act was to release Doyle, even though he was batting .301 and fielding .991 at the time. Even with these seemingly out-of-control traits, Doyle was deemed a natural leader and was selected as team captain in New York, Brooklyn and Chicago, and served as an interim manager for the Giants in 1895 and Washington Senators in 1898.

A hard throwing southpaw with a devastating changeup and pinpoint control, William Hendrick Foster (Rube Foster's half-brother) was one of the best pitchers in the original Negro League. On the last day of the 1926 season, Foster won both ends of a crucial doubleheader to cinch the pennant for the Chicago American Giants. Then, in the ensuing World Series, he posted a 1.27 ERA. He was the leading vote-getter and winning pitcher in the inaugural East-West All-Star Game in 1933. Elected 1996.

Charles "Gabby" Hartnett excelled both behind the plate and at the plate, becoming the first backstop in history to slug 200 home runs and drive in 1,000 runs in a career. His catching prowess prompted pitcher Dizzy Dean to proclaim, "If I had that guy to pitch to all the time, I'd never lose a game." Hartnett, who spent 19 seasons with the Chicago Cubs - where he won four pennants - was named to the NL All-Star Game in the first six years the contest was held, starting behind the plate in 1934, 1936 and 1937. he also won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1935. Elected 1955.

Harry Heilmann spent 15 of his 17 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, racking up an impressive .342 career batting average. Mentored by his teammate and manager, Ty Cobb, Heilmann won four batting titles in seven years from 1921 to 1927. "People nowadays just don't realize how great a hitter Harry was," Cobb said. "Next to Rogers Hornsby, he was the best right-handed hitter of them all." After his playing days were over, Heilmann spent 17 years in the Tigers broadcast booth. Elected 1952

Robert Marvin Hull, OC (born January 3, 1939) is a Canadian former ice hockey player who is regarded as one of the greatest players of all time. His blonde hair, legendary skating speed, end to end rushes, and the ability to shoot the puck at very high velocity, were all a part of the player known as "The Golden Jet". His talents were such that one or two opposing players were often assigned just to shadow him—a tribute to his explosiveness. In his 23 years in the National Hockey League (NHL) and World Hockey Association (WHA), Hull played for the Chicago Black Hawks, Winnipeg Jets, and Hartford Whalers. He won the Hart Memorial Trophy as the NHL's most valuable player twice and the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL's leading point scorer three times, while helping the Black Hawks win the Stanley Cup in 1961. He also led the WHA's Winnipeg Jets to Avco Cup championships in 1976 and 1978. He led the NHL in goals seven times, the second most of any player in history, and led the WHA in goals one additional time while being the WHA's most valuable player two times. He was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1983, the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 1997, and received the Wayne Gretzky International Award in 2003. In 2017 Hull was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.

David Jefferson "Davy" Jones (June 30, 1880 – March 30, 1972), nicknamed "Kangaroo", was an outfielder in Major League Baseball. He played fifteen seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, St. Louis Browns, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, and Pittsburgh Rebels. Jones played with some of the early legends of the game, including Ty Cobb, Sam Crawford, Frank Chance, Three Finger Brown, Hugh Duffy and Jesse Burkett. Also, he played part of one year with the Chicago White Sox, where several of his teammates would later be implicated in the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Jones was immortalized in the classic 1966 baseball book The Glory of Their Times by Lawrence Ritter. Davy Jones was mostly a platoon rather than a full-time player who was decent with the bat and swift on his feet. He played in the major leagues from 1901 to 1918, compiling a .270 career batting average with over 1,000 hits.

Frank William Kellert (July 6, 1924 — November 19, 1976) was an American professional baseball player. The first baseman appeared in 122 games over all or parts of four Major League seasons between 1953 and 1956 for the St. Louis Browns/Baltimore Orioles, Brooklyn Dodgers and Chicago Cubs. He was a member of the 1955 world champion Dodgers, the only Brooklyn team to win a World Series. Kellert threw and batted right-handed. A native and lifelong resident of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, he was an alumnus of Oklahoma State University. Kellert was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1949, acquired by his hometown Oklahoma City Indians of the Double-A Texas League in 1951, and sold to the American League Browns in 1953. Making his MLB debut at age 28 for the Browns on April 18, 1953, he was sent back to Oklahoma City after only two games. The following year, playing for the rival San Antonio Missions, Kellert smashed 41 home runs, led the Texas League in runs batted in with 146, and was selected the TL's Most Valuable Player. That earned him another trial with the relocated Baltimore Orioles in late 1954, starting nine September games at first base. Then, in March 1955, Kellert was traded in a waiver deal to Brooklyn for pitcher Erv Palica. He remained with the Dodgers all season, played in 39 games, and made 17 starts at first base when All-Star and Gold Glover Gil Hodges briefly switched to the outfield in early June and late August. Kellert hit .325 in 80 at bats, with four home runs. Then, in the 1955 World Series, he pinch hit three times, with one hit, a single off Whitey Ford in the eighth inning of Game 1. During Kellert's at bat, Jackie Robinson stole home, but Brooklyn lost to the New York Yankees, 6–5. Kellert pinch hit two more times, going hitless in Dodger losses in Games 2 and 6, but Brooklyn won the series in seven games for its only title before the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season. A week after the Dodger championship, Kellert was placed on waivers and claimed by the Cubs, where he spent the 1956 season but hit only .186 as a part-time first baseman. He played three more seasons in the minors before retiring from baseball at 35.

Tough the power-hitting second baseman was overshadowed by his New York Yankees teammates, Tony "Poosh 'em up" Lazzeri was respected for his quiet leadership skills. A key member of seven pennant winners, he was a .300 hitter five times and drove in more than 100 runs seven times. In 1925, he belted 60 home runs and amassed and amassed 222 RBI for Salt Lake City of the Pacific Coast League. In 1927, hall of Fame manager Miller Huggins said of Lazzeri, "I've seen a few better second baseman, but not many. He has a phenomenal pair of hands, a great throwing arm and he covers acres of ground." Elected 1991.

Tough the power-hitting second baseman was overshadowed by his New York Yankees teammates, Tony "Poosh 'em up" Lazzeri was respected for his quiet leadership skills. A key member of seven pennant winners, he was a .300 hitter five times and drove in more than 100 runs seven times. In 1925, he belted 60 home runs and amassed and amassed 222 RBI for Salt Lake City of the Pacific Coast League. In 1927, hall of Fame manager Miller Huggins said of Lazzeri, "I've seen a few better second baseman, but not many. He has a phenomenal pair of hands, a great throwing arm and he covers acres of ground." Elected 1991.

Salvatore Anthony Maglie (April 26, 1917 – December 28, 1992) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher and later, a scout and a pitching coach. He played from 1945 to 1958 for the New York Giants, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Yankees, and St. Louis Cardinals. Maglie was known as "Sal the Barber", because he gave close shaves—that is, pitched inside to hitters. Coincidentally, he also sported a five o'clock shadow look. He also had the distinction of being one of the few players to play for the Giants, Dodgers and Yankees at a time when all three teams were in New York City (Maglie's playing career pre-dated the 1962 establishment of the fourth New York major league team, the expansion New York Mets, with whom he was never affiliated). During a 10-year major league baseball career, Maglie compiled 119 wins, 862 strikeouts, and a 3.15 earned run average. After his return to the majors, Maglie was integral to the success of the New York Giants teams of the early 1950s. After a stint with Cleveland, Maglie was purchased by the Dodgers in May 1956. Maglie had a sterling comeback season for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956 (who won the NL pennant by one game over the Milwaukee Braves and two games over the Cincinnati Reds), going 13–5 with 2.89 ERA. On September 25 of that year, he no-hit the Philadelphia Phillies 5-0 at Ebbets Field. He finished second to Don Newcombe in the first balloting for the Cy Young Award, and was also second to Newcombe in MVP balloting. He was the Dodgers' pitcher opposing Don Larsen of the Yankees in the latter's famous perfect game in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series.

Henry Emmett "Heinie" Manush was one of seven sons, six of whom played professional baseball. A left-handed, line drive hitting outfielder, Manush consistently ranked among the game's top batters. In 1926, he hit .378 to lead the American League, and his lifetime average was .330 over a 17-year career. In a 1977 interview, Joe Cronin said of Manush, "If he'd catch 'em playing back, he'd dump a bunt. If they moved in on him, Heinie slapped the ball by 'em." Elected 1964.

Henry Emmett "Heinie" Manush was one of seven sons, six of whom played professional baseball. A left-handed, line drive hitting outfielder, Manush consistently ranked among the game's top batters. In 1926, he hit .378 to lead the American League, and his lifetime average was .330 over a 17-year career. In a 1977 interview, Joe Cronin said of Manush, "If he'd catch 'em playing back, he'd dump a bunt. If they moved in on him, Heinie slapped the ball by 'em." Elected 1964.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

William Wilcy "Cy" Moore (May 20, 1897 – March 29, 1963) was a professional baseball right-handed pitcher over parts of six seasons (1927–1933) with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. He led the American League in ERA as a rookie in 1927 while playing for New York. Moore was a member of the 1927 New York Yankees, frequently referred to as Major League Baseball's greatest team of all time. He made his MLB debut on April 14 of that season and proceeded to win 19 games, with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig among his teammates. Moore was the winning pitcher in Game 4 of the 1927 World Series, pitching all nine innings for the champion Yankees against the Pittsburgh Pirates. New York won the game in the bottom of the ninth inning on a wild pitch. He also won the fourth and final game of the 1932 World Series, in which the Yankees defeated the Chicago Cubs. Primarily a relief pitcher, Moore was a member of the Yankee staff during the 1928 World Series as well, but was not needed as the team's starting pitchers threw four consecutive complete games. He was traded by the Yankees on November 21, 1929, who reacquired him on August. 1, 1932. For his career, he compiled a 51–44 record, with a 3.70 ERA and 204 strikeouts. In his two World Series, he went 2–0 in three appearances with a 0.56 ERA. When scouted in 1926, Moore claimed he was 27, but records have proven that his actual age was then 29.

Francis Joseph "Lefty" O'Doul (March 4, 1897 – December 7, 1969) was an American Major League Baseball player who went on to become an extraordinarily successful manager in the minor leagues. He was also a vital figure in the establishment of professional baseball in Japan. Born in San Francisco, California, O'Doul began his professional career as a left-handed pitcher with the minor-league San Francisco Seals of the Triple-A Pacific Coast League. He had some major-league success with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox from 1919 to 1923 as a reliever. In 1927, he became one of what are today four Pacific Coast League hitters to have had a 30 home runs, 30 stolen bases season, along with Joc Pederson (2014), Frank Demaree (1934), and Hall of Famer Tony Lazzeri (1925). O'Doul returned to the majors in 1928, where he batted .319 as a platoon player. In 1929, he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies and, teaming up with Chuck Klein, had one of the best offensive years in baseball history, leading the league in batting at .398 with 254 hits, 32 home runs, 122 runs batted in, and 152 runs scored. His hit total broke the previous National League record of 250 by Rogers Hornsby of the 1922 St. Louis Cardinals. The record was tied by Bill Terry in 1930. After batting .383 with 22 homers during the 1930 season, O'Doul was traded to the Brooklyn Robins (now the Los Angeles Dodgers). In 1932, he batted .368 for Brooklyn to win another league batting title. After a slow start in 1933, when he batted just .252 through 43 games, O'Doul was again traded, this time back to the Giants. He rallied to hit .306 the rest of the way that season, but played just one more year before ending his career in 1934. In an 11-year major league career, he was in 970 games played, 34 games as a relief pitcher and the rest as an outfielder, posting a .349 batting average (1140-for-3264) with 624 runs scored, 175 doubles, 41 triples, 113 home runs, and 542 RBI. His on-base percentage was .413 and slugging percentage was .532. In seven seasons between 1928 and 1934, when he became a regular outfielder, he hit .353 (1126-for-3192). O'Doul hit over .300 six times, missing only in 1933 when he hit .284 playing with the Dodgers and Giants.

Herb Pennock, known as "The Knight of Kennett Square," was a solid southpaw hurler for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox, but made his biggest impact as a member of the New York Yankees. Pennock's first manager in New York, Miller Huggins, called him the greatest left-hander in the history of baseball, saying if Pennock's head was cut open, "The weakness of every batter in the league would fall out." Pennock's Yankees teams won five pennants and four World Series crowns, promoting manager Joe McCarthy to say: "I am going to pitch Pennock in spots this season - the tough ones." Elected 1948.

Eppa Rixey, a tall and lean lefty, battled National League hitters for more than two decades. "How dumb can the hitters in this league get?" questioned Rixey in trying to explain his success. "When their hitting with the count two balls and no strikes, or three and one, they're always looking for the fastball. And they never get it." He retired with 266 wins, then tops among NL southpaws. "(Rixey) was a fierce competitor and a hard loser," said Clyde Sukeforth. "When he pitched, you didn't have to ask who won the game - all you had to do was look at the clubhouse later." Elected 1963.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

Samuel Jackson Snead (pronounced [sni:d]; May 27, 1912 – May 23, 2002) was an American professional golfer who was one of the top players in the world for the better part of four decades (having won PGA of America and Senior PGA Tour events over six decades) and widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time. Snead was awarded a record 94 gold medallions, for wins in PGA of America (referred to by most as the PGA) Tour events and later credited with winning a record 82 PGA Tour events, including seven majors. He never won the U.S. Open, though he was runner-up four times. Snead was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1974. Snead's nicknames included "The Slammer", "Slammin' Sammy Snead", and "The Long Ball Hitter from West Virginia", and he was admired by many for having a "perfect swing", which generated many imitators. Snead was famed for his folksy image, wearing a straw hat, and making such statements as "Keep close count of your nickels and dimes, stay away from whiskey, and never concede a putt."[6] and "There are no short hitters on the tour anymore, just long and unbelievably long." Fellow West Virginia Golf Hall of Fame Inductee Bill Campbell has said of Snead, "He was the best natural player ever. He had the eye of an eagle, the grace of a leopard and the strength of a lion." Gary Player once said that, "I don't think there's any question in my mind that Sam Snead had the greatest golf swing of any human being that ever lived". Jack Nicklaus said that Snead's swing was, "so perfect

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

Cut AUSTIN, JIMMY NM 7

James Phillip Austin (December 8, 1879 – March 6, 1965) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball as a third baseman for the New York Highlanders and St. Louis Browns from 1909 through 1923, 1925 through 1926, and 1929. He also managed the Browns in 1913, 1918, and 1923. After leaving school in 1889, Austin became an apprentice machinist with Westinghouse. After finishing his four-year apprenticeship, Westinghouse went on strike. Austin took up an offer of $40 a month ($1,138), plus a job, to play independent ball in Warren, Ohio. He returned to Westinghouse that fall, but in the spring of 1904, he signed with the Central League's Dayton, Ohio club. Austin remained in Dayton until 1907, when he was sold to Omaha in the Western League. He stole 97 bases for Omaha in 1908, and at the end of the season was sold to the New York Highlanders of the American League. He made his major league debut in 1909 at the relatively advanced age (for baseball) of 28. That year, Austin became immortalized in the Charles M. Conlon photo as the third baseman trying to avoid Ty Cobb's spikes on a stolen base. Of the play, Austin said, "That's Cobb sliding into third and the other guy is me." He played two seasons in New York, but was traded to the St. Louis Browns in 1911 by new Highlanders manager Hal Chase, thus beginning a thirty-year career with the Browns as player and coach. In 1913, when the Browns' player-manager George Stovall was suspended by the American League for spitting at an umpire, Austin was made manager on a temporary basis, until he was replaced by the legendary Branch Rickey. It was Rickey's first managerial job. Austin continued as Rickey's "Sunday Manager" – Rickey had promised his mother that he would not enter a ballpark on the Christian Sabbath, and therefore Austin managed the Browns on those days. Austin played regularly for the Browns until 1921, and served as a coach for another 20 years. Unfortunately, the Browns during this period were rarely ever in the first division, so his team won no pennants during his playing career. The Browns did however finish the 1922 season in second place, one game behind the New York Yankees. Austin did also have the great fortune of either playing for or coaching baseball greats Branch Rickey, George Sisler, and Rogers Hornsby. In 1929, at the age of 49, Austin became one of the oldest major leaguers in history when he was inserted into a blowout. He cleanly handled two chances at third base, and struck out in his only at bat

Cut BALLOU, WIN NM-MT 8

Noble Winfred Ballou (November 30, 1897 – January 30, 1963) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched from 1925 to 1929 with three major league teams and pitched in two games during the 1925 World Series. He spent his college days at Eastern Kentucky University.

Cut BARNES, JESSE NM-MT 8

Jesse Lawrence Barnes (August 26, 1892 – September 9, 1961) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. Barnes began his major league career in 1914 with the Boston Braves. In 1917 he led the National League with 21 losses. On October 2, 1917, he became the only NL pitcher to walk two times in one inning. In 1918, Barnes was traded to the New York Giants. He had three very good years with the Giants. On the last day of the 1919 season, he won his National League-leading 25th victory, 6–1, over Lee Meadows and the Philadelphia Phillies at Polo Grounds. The game was played at a feverish pace and lasted a mere 51 minutes, a major league record that still stands as the shortest nine-inning game ever played. In 1920 he had 20 wins, following with 15 wins in 1921 and two victories in the 1921 World Series against the New York Yankees. Then, on May 7, 1922, he hurled a no-hitter against the Phillies, Cy Williams was the only baserunner who walked and was erased on a double play. He returned to the Boston Braves in 1923, playing for them three years before joining the Brooklyn Robins from 1926 through 1927. For the second time, he led the league in losses (20) in 1924. His younger brother, Virgil, also pitched in the majors, and both were teammates with the Giants from 1919 to 1923. On June 26, 1924, Jesse opposed Virgil in the first pitching matchup of brothers in major league history. Virgil did not have a decision while Jesse was credited with the loss as the Giants defeated the Braves‚ 8-1. The Barnes brothers will match up four more times during their careers‚ the first, including three days from its date. The baseball author and analyst Bill James is also a distant relative of them.

Walter Esau Beall (July 29, 1899 – January 28, 1959) was an American baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. Born in Washington, D.C., Beall was a standout pitcher in the minor leagues before his contract was sold by the Rochester Red Wings of the International League to the New York Yankees in August 1924 for $50,000 He was used sparingly at the major league level, usually in relief. He made appearances with the Yankees from 1924 through 1927, and was a member of the 1927 New York Yankees, a team often considered the greatest ever -- though he only pitched one inning that year (May 30 against the Philadelphia Athletics).. That was Beall's final appearance as a Yankee; two years later, he appeared in three games for the Washington Senators to close out his major league career. Beall is remembered as having one of the greatest curveballs in the history of baseball, though his lack of control prevented him from becoming a great pitcher Teammate Babe Ruth noted that Beall possessed the "greatest curveball I ever saw.

John "Zeke" Bella (August 22, 1930 – November 17, 2013) was a Major League Baseball outfielder; playing for the New York Yankees in 1957 and the Kansas City Athletics in 1959. Bella began his major league career on September 11, 1957, with the Yankees, playing in five games and garnering one hit in ten at bats during what would be his only appearances with the Bombers.. After spending 1958 with the Bears, he was traded to Kansas City for veteran relief pitcher Murry Dickson on August 22. Bella then played in 47 games for Athletics in 1959. He hit his lone major-league home run on August 13, a two-run shot off Jack Harshman of the Cleveland Indians. He retired from baseball after the 1960 minor-league season. In 52 career big-league games, Bella had 18 hits in 92 at-bats, with a .196 batting average.

Bernard Oliver "Benny" Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was an American professional baseball player and coach He played the majority of his Major League Baseball career as a catcher for the New York Yankees during the 1920s when the team garnered the nickname of Murderers' Row, due to their potent batting lineup. He played the final two seasons of his career with the St. Louis Browns. Bengough was a light-hitting, defensive specialist. After his playing career, he spent 18 seasons as a major league coach. Born in Niagara Falls, New York, Bengough was a graduate of Niagara University.[4] He began his professional baseball career at the age of 18 with the Buffalo Bisons of the International League in 1917. After having played for six seasons in Buffalo, he made his major league debut with the Yankees on May 18, 1923 at the age of 24. 1923 was also the first year the Yankees played their home games in Yankee Stadium. At the beginning of his playing career, Bengough served as a back up catcher to Wally Schang. On June 1, 1925, the same day that Lou Gehrig replaced Wally Pipp as the Yankees' first baseman, Bengough was given the Yankees' starting catcher's job. He ended the season with a .258 batting average along with a career-high 14 doubles and 23 runs batted in. Although Bengough was a good defensive player, his offense did not satisfy Yankees manager Miller Huggins and, he returned to his role as a backup catcher for the next few seasons. He had a close friendship with teammate Babe Ruth, both on and off the field. In 1926, Bengough developed a recurring throwing arm injury and the ailment would keep him from playing in the 1926 World Series. He began to play regularly late in the 1928 season and started in all four games of the 1928 World Series, as the Yankees swept the St. Louis Cardinals. He led American League catchers in 1928 with a .992 fielding percentage. Bengough's arm injury continued to hamper him during spring training in 1929 as Bill Dickey took over as the Yankees starting catcher, going on to a successful career and eventual induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1930, the Yankees released Bengough to the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association. In July 1931, he returned to the major leagues with the St. Louis Browns, where he served as a backup catcher to future Hall of Fame member, Rick Ferrell. He played in his final major league game on September 24, 1932. Bengough then returned to the minor leagues where he served as a player-manager for the Washington Generals of the Pennsylvania State Association in 1933 and 1934. He became the player-manager of the Joplin Miners from 1936 to 1937 before retiring as a player at the age of 38.

John Peter "Joe" Boley (July 19, 1896 – December 30, 1962) was a shortstop who played six seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1927 to 1932. He played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Cleveland Indians. Boley is best known as the starting shortstop of the dominant, World Series winning Athletics teams of the late 1920s and early 1930s. Boley started his professional career with the Baltimore Orioles where he played on seven championship teams. Boley, along with teammates Lefty Grove and Jack Ogden were held back by manager Jack Dunn for financial and performance reasons, which held back his Major League career. He was signed by Connie Mack for an estimated $60,000 in 1927, but his career was on the decline. Despite his short MLB career, Boley was one of the top shortstops in baseball.

William Robertson Breckinridge (October 16, 1907 – August 23, 1958) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played three games for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1929.

Thomas Jefferson Davis Bridges (December 28, 1906 – April 19, 1968) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers from 1930 to 1946. During the 1930s, he used an outstanding curveball to become one of the mainstays of the team's pitching staff, winning 20 games in three consecutive seasons and helping the team to its first World Series championship with two victories in the 1935 Series. He retired with 1,674 career strikeouts, then the eighth highest total in American League history, and held the Tigers franchise record for career strikeouts from 1941 to 1951.

Clinton Harold Brown (July 8, 1903 – December 31, 1955) was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of fifteen seasons (1928–1942) with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. For his career, he compiled an 89–93 record in 434 appearances, mostly as a relief pitcher, with a 4.26 earned run average and 410 strikeouts. In 1939, Brown finished 11th in the voting for American League Most Valuable Player.

Richard Paul "Rooster" Burleson (born April 29, 1951) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop. "Rooster," as Burleson was nicknamed, was a famously intense ballplayer. Former Boston Red Sox teammate Bill Lee once said of Burleson, "Some guys didn't like to lose, but Rick got angry if the score was even tied. On May 4, Burleson tied a major league record by committing three errors in his major league debut, and was replaced by Guerrero at short by the end of the game.[2] Despite the inauspicious start to his career, he would eventually end up being considered among the best defensive shortstops of his generation, earning a Gold Glove Award in 1979. Burleson was batting .298 with one home run, 28 runs batted in and 45 runs scored to be elected the starting American League shortstop at the 1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.[3] For the season, Burleson batted .293 with three home runs, 52 RBIs and 80 runs scored, and was second to Jim Rice among team hit leaders with 194 base hits. Burleson received All-Star nods in 1978 and 1979 as well. In 1979, Burleson batted .278, scored 90 runs and earned the AL's Gold Glove Award at short to earn his first of two consecutive Thomas A. Yawkey Awards as the Most Valuable Player of the Boston Red Sox. He batted .278 with a career high eight home runs and 89 runs scored, and set a major league record for double plays by a shortstop in a single season with 147 en route to winning the award the following season. From 1975 to 1980, he played in at least 145 games and got at least 140 hits each season.

George Henry Burns (January 31, 1893 – January 7, 1978), nicknamed "Tioga George", was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball (MLB) who played for five American League (AL) teams from 1914 to 1929. One of the league's top right-handed batters of the 1920s, he was named the AL Most Valuable Player in 1926 with the Cleveland Indians after batting .358 and setting a major league record with 64 doubles. A career .307 hitter, he retired with 2,018 hits, then the third-highest total by an AL right-handed hitter. His 1,671 games at first base were the most by an AL right-handed player until 1940; he still ranks third in league history.

George Henry Burns (January 31, 1893 – January 7, 1978), nicknamed "Tioga George", was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball (MLB) who played for five American League (AL) teams from 1914 to 1929. One of the league's top right-handed batters of the 1920s, he was named the AL Most Valuable Player in 1926 with the Cleveland Indians after batting .358 and setting a major league record with 64 doubles. A career .307 hitter, he retired with 2,018 hits, then the third-highest total by an AL right-handed hitter. His 1,671 games at first base were the most by an AL right-handed player until 1940; he still ranks third in league history.

Wilmer Dean Chance (June 1, 1941 – October 11, 2015) was an American professional baseball player. A right-handed pitcher, he played in 11 Major League Baseball seasons for the Los Angeles Angels, Minnesota Twins, Cleveland Indians, New York Mets and Detroit Tigers. With a touch of wildness and the habit of never looking at home plate once he received the sign from his catcher, Chance would turn his back fully towards the hitter in mid-windup before spinning and unleashing a good fastball, sinker or sidearm curveball. In 1964, Chance became at the time the youngest pitcher to win the Cy Young Award when, as a member of the Los Angeles Angels, he led the American League in wins (20), innings pitched (2781/3) and earned run average (1.65—as of 2015, a franchise record) and was third in the A.L. in strikeouts. He pitched 11 shutouts (also a franchise record as of 2015) that season, winning five of those by a 1–0 score. At the time, only one Cy Young Award was given in all of MLB; since 1967, separate awards have been given in the AL and the National League. Chance's Cy Young Award was the third in a string of five consecutive Cy Young Awards won by a pitcher from a Los Angeles-based team. The others were won by Dodger pitchers: Don Drysdale in 1962 and Sandy Koufax in 1963, 1965, and 1966.

A member of the 1903 World Series champions, Jimmy Collins was a magician with the glove and a terror with the bat. A feared clutch hitter for the Boston ball clubs, he batted .346 in 1897 and the following season led the National League in home runs with 15. Collins hit .300 or better five times and was Boston's player-manager for its first six seasons in the upstart American League. His defensive wizardry at the hot corner neutralized the opposition's bunting tactics. Elected 1945.

William Richard Cox (August 29, 1919 – March 30, 1978) was an American professional baseball third baseman and shortstop. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Brooklyn Dodgers, and Baltimore Orioles. He played for the Newport Buffaloes high school team. Signed as an amateur free agent by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1940, Cox made his MLB debut with the Pirates on September 20, 1941, playing in ten games at shortstop that season[1] before serving in the military during World War II. After returning to the Pirates, he was the starting shortstop in 1946 and 1947 before being traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers on December 8, 1947, along with Preacher Roe and Gene Mauch, for Dixie Walker, Hal Gregg and Vic Lombardi. Cox was the third baseman of a Dodgers infield in the 1950s that included Gil Hodges, Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese. In the 1953 World Series, Cox had a two-run double in Game 2 and a three-run homer in Game 5 against the New York Yankees. He batted .304 for the Series and led Brooklyn in runs batted in with six. Cox was an infield starter (principally at third base) and leadoff hitter for the Baltimore Orioles for the first half of 1955, but after being pulled for a pinch runner on June 11, was traded at the trading deadline, June 16. Cox, however, would not report to his new team, the Cleveland Indians, reigning American League champions. Even after a meeting with Indians' manager Al López, Cox resolved to retire and did so on June 17. After Cox retired, the Orioles did not settle on a starting third baseman until Brooks Robinson won the job in 1957. The Orioles used 13 third basemen in 1955.

Alvin Floyd Crowder (January 11, 1899 – April 3, 1972), nicknamed "General", was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played eleven seasons in the American League with the Washington Senators, the St. Louis Browns, and the Detroit Tigers. In 402 career games, Crowder pitched 2344.1 innings and posted a win-loss record of 167–115, with 150 complete games, 16 shutouts, and a 4.12 earned run average (ERA).

Hazen Cuyler's minor league teammates would shout a shortened version of his surname, "Cuy! Cuy!," allowing their star outfielder to take fly balls they could not reach. Cuyler thus earned the nickname, "Kiki." A powerful clutch hitter with blazing speed, Cuyler broke into the major leagues with the Pittsburgh Pirates, leading them to the pennant and smashing a dramatic two-run double off Walter Johnson to win the 1925 World Series. Cuyler later enjoyed several banner seasons with the Chicago Cubs, topping the league in stolen bases his first three years with the club and clouting a bases-loaded triple to clinch the 1932 NL pennant. Elected 1968.

George Willis "Kiddo" Davis (February 12, 1902 – March 4, 1983) was a Major League Baseball outfielder. He played all or part of eight seasons in the majors, 1926 and 1932-1938. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants, New York Yankees, and Philadelphia Phillies. Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Davis acquired the nickname “Kiddo” because he typically played baseball with children who were a few years older than he was. Davis attended Bridgeport High School before beginning his professional baseball career. In an eight-year major league career, Davis batted .282 (515-1824) with 281 runs scored, 19 home runs and 171 RBI. His on-base percentage was .336 and slugging percentage was .393. He compiled a .980 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions. In nine World Series games (1933 and 1936), he hit .381 (8-21).

Cut DEBERRY, HANK NM-MT 8

John Herman DeBerry (December 29, 1894 in Savannah, Tennessee – September 10, 1951), was an American professional baseball player, and scout. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball, most notably for the Brooklyn Robins during the 1920s. He was known for his defensive skills and for being the catcher for Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Dazzy Vance. DeBerry was born in Savannah, Tennessee and attended the University of Tennessee. He began his professional baseball career in 1914 at the age of 19 with the Paducah Indians of the Kentucky–Illinois–Tennessee League. He made his major league debut with the Cleveland Indians on September 12, 1916, at the age of 21. DeBerry appeared in 25 games for the Indians in 1917, but spent most of the season playing for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association. He joined the United States Navy in 1918 during the First World War. He returned to professional baseball after the war, playing for the New Orleans Pelicans of the Southern Association from 1919 to 1921. DeBerry returned to the major leagues in 1922 when the Brooklyn Robins purchased his contract from the Pelicans. Ironically, the Robins wanted to acquire DeBerry, but the Pelicans would not complete the deal unless Vance was included in the transaction. He was expected to be a backup catcher for Otto Miller however, Miller only appeared in 33 games and DeBerry caught the majority of the Robins' games that season.[7] He finished the year with a career-high .301 batting average and was third among National League catchers in range factor. From 1923 to 1925, he shared catching duties with Zack Taylor. It was during the 1920s that DeBerry developed his association with pitcher, Dazzy Vance and, the two players became known as one of the greatest batteries of their era.[8] With DeBerry as his catcher, Vance led the National League in strikeouts for seven consecutive seasons between 1922 and 1928. Vance also twice led the league in wins. DeBerry caught the no hitter thrown by Vance on September 23, 1925. By 1930, the 35-year-old DeBerry was in decline and Al López had emerged as his successor. He played in his final major league game on September 28, 1930. On January 19, 1931, the Robins traded DeBerry along with Eddie Moore to the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League for future Hall of Fame catcher, Ernie Lombardi. Later that year he signed to play for the Dallas Steers, but only appeared in five games and was released in July of that same year at the age of 36.

Martin Dihigo Llanos was perhaps the most versatile player in baseball history, known as "El Maestro." Dihigo spent more than 12 seasons in the Negro Leagues. He also starred in leagues in Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. Johnny Mize said of the Cuban-born star: "He was the only guy I ever saw who could play all nine positions, run, manage and switch-hit." In the 1938 Mexican League, Dihigo went 18-2, led the league with a 0.90 ERA and won the batting crown with a .387 mark. He totaled more than 260 wins while smashing his way to three Negro League home run crowns. Elected 1977

Cut DOUGLAS, PHIL NM-MT 8

Phillip Brooks Douglas (June 17, 1890 – August 1, 1952) was an American baseball player. He was known as "Shufflin' Phil", most likely because of his slow gait from the bullpen to the mound. Douglas originally signed with the Chicago White Sox in 1912, but soon landed with the Cincinnati Reds. In 1915, he was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers, then to the Chicago Cubs. Douglas' short stints with these and future teams stemmed from their frustrations with his well-documented alcoholism, about which a contemporary journalist wrote, "Drinking was not a habit with Douglas—it was a disease." His throwing error on a sacrifice bunt in Game 4 of the 1918 World Series gave the Boston Red Sox a 3-2 victory over the Cubs. In 1919, he was signed by the New York Giants. John McGraw had some luck in keeping Douglas' drinking under control. In 1920, Douglas had a 14–10 record and a 2.71 ERA. Following the season, the spitball was banned but 17 players, including Douglas, were allowed to continue using the pitch. Douglas' best year was in 1921, when he won 15 games in the regular season with an ERA of 2.08. He then won two games in the 1921 World Series to help the Giants win the series. In 1922, he had 11 wins and a league-leading 2.63 ERA, but was suspended after a quarrel with McGraw and fined $100. Shortly after he was suspended and while intoxicated, Douglas sent the following letter to Les Mann of the St. Louis Cardinals: I want to leave here but I want some inducement. I don't want this guy to win the pennant and I feel if I stay here I will win it for him. If you want to send a man over here with the goods, I will leave for home on next train. I will go down to fishing camp and stay there. The letter found its way to Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Landis banned Douglas from baseball for life.

Cut DUDLEY, CLISE NM-MT 8

Elzie Clise Dudley (August 8, 1903 – January 12, 1989) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched from 1929 to 1933. He attended the University of South Carolina. On April 27, 1929, Dudley became the 2nd player and first pitcher to hit a home run on the first pitch he ever saw. Despite the achievement, Brooklyn lost 8-3 to the Philadelphia Phillies. (Walter Mueller was the first player to do so, an outfielder, in 1922.)

Joseph Anthony (Joe) Dugan (May 12, 1897 – July 7, 1982), was an American professional baseball player.[1] Nicknamed "Jumping Joe", he was considered one of the best defensive third basemen of his era.[2][3] He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop and third baseman from 1917 through 1931, most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees, with whom he played in five World Series.

Malcolm Wayne (Mal) Eason (March 13, 1879 – April 16, 1970) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Orphans (1900–1902), Boston Beaneaters (1902), Detroit Tigers (1903) and Brooklyn Superbas (1905–1906). Eason batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Brookville, Pennsylvania. From 1901 to 1902 Eason went 8–17 and 10–12, while pitching for awful teams. Despite his losing records, he registered 3.59 and 2.61 ERAs respectively. His most productive season came in 1906, when he posted a 10–17 mark with a 3.25 ERA. It was his last season as an active player. That July 20, Eason no-hit the St. Louis Cardinals 2-0. Earlier in the season, he had been the losing pitcher in the last no-hitter before this one, by the Philadelphia Phillies' Johnny Lush on May 1. Not until Bill McCahan in 1947 would another pitcher hurl a no-hitter after being on the losing end of the last no-hitter before it. In a six-season career, Eason posted a 36–73 record with 274 strikeouts and a 3.42 ERA in 951 1/3 innings pitched. He completed 90 of 114 starts, including ten shutouts.

David Meadow Ferriss (December 5, 1921 – November 24, 2016) was an American Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Boston Red Sox from 1945 through 1950. Ferriss was given the nickname 'Boo' as the result of a childhood inability to pronounce the word 'brother'. After Ferriss's MLB playing career was over, he returned to the Mississippi Delta for two stints as the head baseball coach at Delta State University where he retired as the school's all-time leader in wins with 639. In November 2002, he was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame. When the Red Sox started slowly in 1945, Ferriss was called up and made a spectacular major league debut with a five-hit shutout against the Athletics on April 29.[6] He went on to set a longstanding American League (AL) record for scoreless innings pitched at the start of a career with 22, which stood until 2008, when it was broken by Brad Ziegler. Ferriss compiled a 21–10 win-loss record for the Red Sox in his rookie season. Ferriss then compiled a 25–6 record (the best in the AL) that helped the Red Sox win the AL pennant in 1946. He was selected for the All-Star Game that season for the first and only time but did not pitch (the 1945 All-Star Game had been cancelled due to World War II). He started two games in the 1946 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, and pitched a complete-game shutout in the third game before getting a no-decision in the seventh and deciding game, which was won by the Cardinals. Ferriss' record in 1947 was 12–11. His arm troubles and asthma restricted him to only nine starts and thirty-one appearances in 1948, and four appearances in 1949. His final major league appearance was on Opening Day of the 1950 season, when he pitched only one inning. Ferriss compiled a career record of 65–30, and shares the MLB record for consecutive home wins to start a season (13, in 1946). He was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002. Ferriss was a very good hitting pitcher in his six-year major league career, posting a .250 batting average (93-for-372) with one home run, 52 RBIs, and 44 runs scored. He had 19 RBIs in each of the 1945 and 1947 seasons. He finished his career with a .979 fielding percentage.

John Patrick Grabowski (January 7, 1900 – May 23, 1946), nicknamed "Nig", was an American baseball player. He played professional baseball for 12 years from 1922 to 1933, including seven years as a catcher in Major League Baseball with the Chicago White Sox (1924–1926), New York Yankees (1927–1929), and Detroit Tigers (1931). He was a member of the 1927 and 1928 New York Yankees teams that won consecutive World Series championships. Grabowski began his professional baseball career in 1922 with the St. Joseph Saints and in 1923 and 1924 with the Minneapolis Millers the American Association. He was traded to the Chicago White Sox in July 1924 and made his major league debut that month.[3] He played for the White Sox for three years from 1924 to 1926, appearing in 89 games, 78 of them as a catcher. One of the games Grabowski caught was Ted Lyons' no-hitter on August 21, 1926. In January 1927, the White Sox traded Grabowski to the New York Yankees.[5] He had his best season for the 1927 "Murderer's Row" New York Yankees, considered by some to be the best baseball team in history. Grabowski appeared in 70 games for the 1927 Yankees, sharing the catching duty with Pat Collins and Benny Bengough in 1927. Grabowski had a .350 on-base percentage for the 1927 Yankees. He remained with the Yankees through the 1929 season and won two World Series championships with the Yankees in 1927 and 1928. After spending 1930 with the St. Paul Saints, Grabowski returned to the major leagues in 1930 with the Detroit Tigers.[6] He appeared in 40 games with the Tigers, 39 as a catcher. He appeared in his last major league game in September 1931. In seven major league seasons, Grabowski appeared in 296 games, 282 as a catcher, and compiled a career .252 batting average and .295 on-base percentage.

Clark Griffith was a baseball pioneer his entire life. In 1901, "The Old Fox" became a player-manager for the Chicago White Sox in the new American League, leading them to a pennant. Griffith managed until 1920, when he became the Washington Senators principal owner after being a part owner since 1912. Innovative with limited finances, he won three pennants, hired entertainers for fans to enjoy and signed many Cuban players. "He was the greatest humanitarian who ever lived, and the greatest pillar of honesty ever had," said Bobo Newsom. "I never played for a better man. Elected 1946.

Walter Charles Hagen (December 21, 1892 – October 6, 1969) was an American professional golfer and a major figure in golf in the first half of the 20th century. His tally of 11 professional majors is third behind Jack Nicklaus (18) and Tiger Woods (15). Hagen is widely considered one of the greatest golfers ever. Hagen won the U.S. Open twice, and in 1922 he became the first native-born American to win the British Open, and won the Claret Jug three more times.[3] He also won the PGA Championship a record-tying five times (all in match play), and the Western Open five times when it had near-major championship status. Hagen totaled 45 PGA wins in his career, and was a six-time Ryder Cup captain. The Masters Tournament, the newest major, was established in 1934, after his prime.

Franklin Witman "Blimp" Hayes (October 13, 1914 – June 22, 1955) was an American professional baseball catcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, St. Louis Browns, Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, and Boston Red Sox. Although Hayes was considered one of the best catchers in the American League in the late 1930s and early 1940s, he played for an Athletics team that routinely finished in last place. A six-time All-Star, he holds the major league record of most consecutive games played by a catcher. Hayes made his major league debut with the Athletics on September 21, 1933, at the age of 18, making him the youngest player in the league at the time. He was hitless in five at bats that season.After the Athletics' regular catcher, Charlie Berry, suffered an injury in 1934, Hayes took his place and set a major league record for most games caught in a season by a teenager when he appeared in 92 games as a nineteen-year-old. In September 1934, Hayes joined a group of American baseball players led by Connie Mack in a barnstorming tour of Japan when Charlie Berry, who had originally been selected to go, was struck with appendicitis.[5] Among the baseball players who joined Hayes in Japan were Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx and Charlie Gehringer. He was sent to the minor leagues in 1935, where he played for the Buffalo Bisons and the Albany Senators of the International League. Hayes returned to the major leagues in 1936, replacing Paul Richards as the Athletics starting catcher, a position he held for six seasons. On July 25, 1936, he tied a major league record by hitting 4 doubles in a game against the Cleveland Indians. In 1939, Hayes earned his first All-Star selection when he was named as a reserve behind Bill Dickey on the American League team in the 1939 All-Star Game. He ended the year with a .283 batting average along with career-highs of 20 home runs and 83 runs batted in. His batting average improved in 1940, when he posted a .308 batting average with 16 home runs and 70 runs batted in.[1] Hayes' on-base percentage also improved from .348 in 1939 to .389, and was once again named as a reserve player for the American League team in the 1940 All-Star Game. He had another respectable season in 1941, hitting for a .280 average along with 12 home runs and 63 runs batted in, and for the third consecutive year, was named to as a reserve player for the American League in the 1941 All-Star Game. Despite his contributions, the Athletics finished in last place for the second consecutive season.

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Harvey "Gink" Hendrick (November 9, 1897 – October 29, 1941) was an American Major League Baseball player who played for several different teams during an eleven-year career. He signed with the Memphis Chicks after graduating from Vanderbilt, but was released from the team before playing a game. He began his professional career with the Chattanooga Lookouts in 1921, and had a .274 batting average in 141 games. He followed that up the following year with a .311 batting average in 134 games for the Galveston Sand Crabs. During the offseason, shortly after being signed by the Boston Red Sox, Hendrick was traded to the New York Yankees with George Pipgras for Al DeVormer. He made his major league debut with the Yankees in 1923, where he had a .273 batting average in 37 games and had one at-bat in the 1923 World Series. After one more year with New York where he played in 40 games, he joined the Cleveland Indians and played in 25 games for them. Hendrick spent 1926 in the minor leagues with the Newark Bears, then joined the Brooklyn Robins, arriving days before everyone else for spring training, as the team planned to use him as a utility player. In 1927, he had a .310 average and 29 stolen bases in 128 games, then followed that up a .318 average in 1928, a .354 average in 1929 which was ninth in the National League along with 14 home runs and 82 runs batted in, and a .257 average in 1930. After playing in one game for the Robins in 1931, he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds for Mickey Heath. In 137 games for the Reds, he had a .314 batting average. Hendrick split 1932 with the Reds and St. Louis Cardinals, who he was traded to during the season for Chick Hafey. He then finished his career with the Chicago Cubs in 1933 and the Philadelphia Phillies in 1934. In an 11-year major league career, Hendrick batted .308 (896-2910) with 434 runs scored, 48 home runs and 413 RBI in 922 games played. His on-base percentage was .364 and slugging percentage was .443. He surpassed the .300 mark four times.

Donald Albert Hoak (February 5, 1928 – October 9, 1969), nicknamed "Tiger", was an American professional baseball third baseman and coach. He played eleven seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) (1954–1964) for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Redlegs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Philadelphia Phillies. He broke into the professional baseball in 1947 after a stint in the United States Navy towards the end of World War II. He signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers organization and worked his way up the organization based almost solely on his glove, speed on the bases and tenacity. In 1954, his patience was rewarded by a spot on the Brooklyn Dodgers roster. During his two seasons with the Dodgers, Hoak shared third base duties with Jackie Robinson and Billy Cox. In 1955, the Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series to win their only championship in Brooklyn. Hoak played third base in place of Robinson in the seventh and deciding game of that Series—the only World Series game Robinson did not play in during his career when his team was in the World Series. After the season, Hoak was traded to the Chicago Cubs. In 1956, Hoak batted .215 with 5 home runs and 37 RBIs, and also set a National League record by striking out six times in one game, against six different pitchers, in which 48 players were used in a 17-inning marathon on May 2, won by the visiting New York Giants 6-5.

Many feel Hodges should be in the Hall of Fame but it has not happened yet. He would play for the Brooklyn Dodgers and LA Dodgers winning 3 World Series and would be selected to 8 All Star Teams. He would also lead the NY Mets to their first World Series defeating the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles.

"Shrewd" is the word best used to describe Miller Huggins. A smart second baseman who always found a way to get on base, the 5-foot 6-inch "Hug" skippered the St Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees for 17 seasons, leading the Bronx Bombers to their first six pennants and three World Series championships, effectively beginning the Yankees dynasty. In 1932, a monument to the "Mighty Mite" was dedicated and placed in center field at Yankee Stadium in his memory.

Leading the Detroit Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants, Hughie Jennings was no stranger to success. As a shortstop with a propensity to for being hit by pitched balls, the freckle-faced redhead helped the Baltimore Orioles to three straight National League pennants and four trips to the Temple Cup, (precursor to the World Series) during the 1890's. The man from Pennsylvania coal country was noted for the perpetual grin on his face that umpire Tim Hurst claimed "echoes." Elected 1945.

Leading the Detroit Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants, Hughie Jennings was no stranger to success. As a shortstop with a propensity to for being hit by pitched balls, the freckle-faced redhead helped the Baltimore Orioles to three straight National League pennants and four trips to the Temple Cup, (precursor to the World Series) during the 1890's. The man from Pennsylvania coal country was noted for the perpetual grin on his face that umpire Tim Hurst claimed "echoes." Elected 1945.

Samuel Pond "Sad Sam" Jones (July 26, 1892 – July 6, 1966) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators and the Chicago White Sox between 1914 and 1935. Jones batted and threw right-handed. His sharp breaking curveball also earned him the nickname "Horsewhips Sam".In a 22-year career, Jones compiled a 229–217 record with 1223 strikeouts and a 3.84 ERA in 3,883 innings pitched. Jones signed his first professional contract in 1913, with a minor league team in Zanesville, Ohio. He made his major league debut with the Indians in 1914. Before the 1916 season, he was sent to Boston in the same trade that brought Tris Speaker to Cleveland. In 1918, Jones joined the Red Sox starting rotation, ending with a 16–5 mark, a career-best 2.25 ERA, and a league-best .762 winning percentage. His most productive season came in 1921, when he posted career-highs in wins (23), strikeouts (98) and innings (298.2), and led the league in shutouts (5). But his most remembered season may have been 1923 as the ace of the Yankees' staff; he posted a 21–8 record with a 3.63 ERA and led his team to their first World Series title. Jones also no-hit the Philadelphia Athletics 2-0 on September 4 at Shibe Park, in a game in which he did not record a strikeout the entire game. Only one other pitcher (Ken Holtzman, 1969) has thrown a no-hitter with no strikeouts. Jones was 2–1 against the New York Giants in that World Series, and his crucial relief work in the final game of the Series clinched the championship for the Yankees. Like most pitchers of his time, Jones relieved as well as started, and his eight saves in 1922 led the league's relief pitchers. Jones lost a league-high 21 games in 1925. He pitched for the Browns a year later, and was waived to Washington in 1927. With the Senators, Jones regained his form, leading his team's staff with a 17–7 record. He enjoyed his last good season in 1930, ending with a 15–7 mark. After four years of service for the White Sox, Jones retired in 1935 as the oldest active player at the time (42). His 22 consecutive seasons pitching in one league is a major league record shared with Herb Pennock, Early Wynn, Red Ruffing and Steve Carlton. He was a better than average hitting pitcher in his career, compiling a .197 batting average (245-for-1243) with 151 runs, 6 home runs and 101 RBI.

James Ward Keesey (October 27, 1902 – September 5, 1951) was an American professional baseball player. He played in 5 games for the Major League Baseball Philadelphia Athletics during the 1925 season and 11 games during the 1930 season. He was born in Perryville, Maryland, and died in Boise, Idaho, at the age of 48.

Joseph James Kelley was a perennial .300 hitter and a member of five pennant winners during the 1890's. Kelley could seemingly do it all. Always a team leader, the left fielder was a supremely confident individual. On Labor Day 1894, Kelley put on one of the greatest offensive displays in major league history when he went 9-for-9 in a double-deader, hitting four consecutive doubles off Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young. Elected 1971.

Walter Arlington Latham (March 15, 1860 – November 29, 1952) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball. He played from 1880 through 1909 for the Buffalo Bisons, St. Louis Browns, Chicago Pirates, Cincinnati Reds, Washington Senators and New York Giants. He also served as player-manager of the Browns in 1896. Latham stole 129 bases during the 1887 season. His career total of 742 ranks seventh all-time in the majors. As a player-coach for the 1909 Giants, Latham at age 49 became the oldest MLB player to steal a base. After his retirement as a player, he became what is acknowledged as the first full-time base coach in baseball history. For years he served as a coach and manager in minor league baseball.

George Edward "Duffy" Lewis (April 18, 1888 – June 17, 1979), born in San Francisco, California, was a left fielder and right-handed batter who played Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1910–17), New York Yankees (1919–20) and Washington Senators (1921). Lewis attended Saint Mary's College of California. In Boston, Lewis belonged to the outfield trio which included Tris Speaker (CF) and Harry Hooper (RF) and is considered perhaps the best ever in fielding skill. At bat, Lewis was a renowned line-drive hitter who consistently finished in the top ten in most offensive categories despite a short career which was interrupted by World War I (Duffy served as a petty officer in the US Navy). In 11 seasons, Lewis batted .284 with 38 home runs, 793 RBI, 612 runs, 1,518 hits, 289 doubles, 68 triples, and 113 stolen bases in 1,459 games. In three World Series covering 18 games for the Red Sox, Lewis posted a .299 average (20-for-67) with 8 runs, 1 home run and 7 RBI. During his tenure in Boston patrolling left field, Fenway Park featured a ten-foot-high mound that formed an incline in front of the left field wall, now better known as the Green Monster. The young outfielder mastered the incline to such an extent that it was nicknamed "Duffy's Cliff".[2] Sports cartoons of the period often depicted him as a mountain climber making catches amid sheep and snowcaps. The mound was eventually reduced in 1934, long after Lewis had left the Sox, and was not eliminated until the field underwent a major renovation following the 2004 season. Duffy Lewis died in Salem, New Hampshire at 91 years of age. He was selected to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002.

Co-owner and business manager of the Newark Eagles from 1936 to 1948, Effa Manley was noted for running one of the most professional organizations in the Negro Leagues. Using her position with Newark to crusade for civil rights, Manley made the Eagles a social force off the field and a baseball force on it, as the club was usually a top-division team and won the Negro League World Series in 1946. With the sale of Monte Irvin to the New York Giants, Manley established that major league clubs should respect the contracts of the Negro Leagues by offering financial compensation. Elected 2006.

"Walter Maranville is the greatest player to enter baseball since Ty Cobb arrived," raved Boston Braves manager George Stallings. Maranville compensated for his lack of size with an overabundance of energy and determination. During his 23-year major league career, spent exclusively in the National League, the wide-ranging infielder accumulated a record 5,139 putouts at shortstop and developed a reputation for eye-popping "basket catches." Maranville finished in the top ten for the NL MVP Award five times, including a runner-up finish in 1914 after being a key member of the "Miracle Braves." Elected 1954.

Johnny Leonard Roosevelt "Pepper" Martin (February 29, 1904 – March 5, 1965) was an American professional baseball player and minor league manager. He was known as the Wild Horse of the Osage because of his daring, aggressive baserunning abilities. Martin played in Major League Baseball as a third baseman and an outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1930s and early 1940s. He was best known for his heroics during the 1931 World Series, in which he was the catalyst in a Cardinals' upset victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. Martin was an integral member of the Cardinals' teams of the 1930s that became known as the Gashouse Gang for their roguish behavior and practical jokes. Martin was even referred to as the inspiration for the pre-game warmup routine of "pepper. Early in his career, he was labeled by some contemporary press reports as the next Ty Cobb because of his spirited, hustling style of play. However, because his headlong attitude on the playing field took a physical toll on his body, he never lived up to those initial expectations. After the end of his playing career, he continued his career in baseball as a successful minor league baseball manager.

Edgar Martinez (January 2, 1963 -) is the only full-time designated hitter in Major League Baseball history to win a batting title, and has garnered significant consideration for Hall of Fame induction possibly making him the first DH to achieve such an honor. Edgar signed with the Seattle Mariners in 1982 and was widely recognized for his glove rather than his bat. Playing in the minor league until 1987 and finally finding a regular spot in 1990, Edgar made the best of his new job as he batted .302 with 11 home runs and 49 RBI as a third baseman. In1992. He led the American League in doubles with 47 and batting average with a .343 mark. By 1995, the Mariners used Martinez strictly as a designated hitter and he responded leading the AL in games (145), runs (121), doubles (52), batting average (.356) and on-base percentage (.479). He won his second of five Silver Sluggers, earned his second of seven All-Star appearances and finished third in AL MVP voting. Playing much of his career hitting behind sluggers Ken Griffey, Jr., Jay Buhner and Alex Rodriguez, once Martinez became the undisputed Mariners DH his number were staggering as he averaged a .316 BA, 156 hits, 36 doubles, 25 HRs and 99 RBI from 1995 to 2004. His numbers even rose as Seattle traded or lost high-profile players to free agency. Edgar is often remembered for his clutch hitting, most significantly when he hit a doubles against the New York Yankees in the 1995 ALDS to put them into the ALCS against the Cleveland Indians. The shot is known in the Settle area as "The Double." Edgar Martinez ended his career, entirely played with the Mariners (1987-2004), with a .312 career batting average, 2,247 hits including 514 doubles and 309 home runs, 1,219 runs and 1,261 RBI. In 2004, Major League Baseball renamed the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award the Edgar Martinez Outstanding Designated Hitter Award. edgar Martinez was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

"There has only been one manager, and his name is John McGraw," Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack once declared. McGraw was a fiery third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles in the 1890's, but he received much more recognition as an innovative, autocratic field manager. In his 31 years at the helm of the New York Giants, McGraw's teams won 10 pennants, finished second 10 times, and won three World Series titles. "Little Napoleon" finished his career with 2,763 managerial wins. As a player, he was credited with helping to develop the hit-and-run, the "Baltimore Chop," the squeeze play and other strategic moves. Elected 1937.

Donald Eric McNair (April 12, 1909 – March 11, 1949) was a Major League Baseball shortstop from 1929 to 1942. He played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, and Chicago White Sox. McNair became an everyday player with Philadelphia in 1932, and he led the league in doubles that season. After his playing days, McNair had brief tenures as a minor-league manager and as a baseball scout. He died of heart problems a month before his 40th birthday. McNair spent much of 1929 with minor-league teams in Memphis and Knoxville. Late in the year, he was called up to the Philadelphia Athletics. The team went to the World Series that year, but McNair had been called up too late to be included in the World Series roster. Connie Mack and John Shibe arranged for McNair to serve as an usher so that he could watch his team play. McNair said that he had great difficulty directing fans to their seats, so he ultimately took off his badge and sat in an aisle to watch the games. The Athletics won that series four games to one. In 1932, his first season as a major league regular, McNair led the American League in doubles with 47. He struggled in the infield during the early part of that season, often committing two errors in the same game. Manager Jimmy Dykes helped him to relax and to forget about errors after they happened, which led to better overall fielding. McNair was a member of a 1934 All-American team that toured China, Japan and the Philippines, playing against teams in those countries. McNair recalled that the series in Japan was particularly popular: After 75,000 people attended each of the first four games, the Japanese government cancelled the fifth game out of concern that too many people were neglecting their work. In 1936, for reasons that are still unknown, McNair wore uniform number 4 rather than his previous number 6 jersey. Player-manager Joe Cronin wore number 4 for the Red Sox in every other season between 1935 and 1945; the Red Sox later retired Cronin's number. In a 14-year, 1251-game career, McNair compiled a .274 batting average (1240-for-4519) with 82 home runs and 633 RBI. He recorded a .950 fielding percentage as an infielder.

Edmund John "Bing" Miller (August 30, 1894 – May 7, 1966) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder, most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics for whom he spent the prime years of his career. Born in Vinton, Iowa, Miller debuted in the major leagues on April 16, 1921, at the age of 26 with the Washington Senators, but in 1922 Miller was traded to the Philadelphia Athletics. He also appeared for the St. Louis Browns and Boston Red Sox. Miller batted .311 in 1,820 Major League games played with 1,934 hits over the course of his 16-year career, with 389 doubles, 96 triples and 116 home runs. Defensively, he recorded a .972 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions and first base. He is best known for hitting a two-out walk-off double in the bottom of the ninth inning in Game 5 of the 1929 World Series, in which the Athletics won their fourth world championship. Miller was the A's starting right fielder during their three consecutive American League championships, and batted .258 with 17 hits in 18 World Series games from 1929–1931. He retired as a player six days after his 42nd birthday. Miller was a professional baseball coach for 17 years after his playing career ended, working with the Red Sox (1937), Detroit Tigers (1938–1941), Chicago White Sox (1942–1949) and Athletics (1950–1953). Bing Miller's younger brother Ralph Miller (left-handed pitcher) played in one Major League game for the Washington Senators in 1921. On May 7, 1966, he was injured in an auto accident while driving home after attending a game at Connie Mack Stadium between the Phillies and Pirates. Taken to Presbyterian Hospital in Philadelphia, Bing Miller died six hours after the accident.

Lowell Otto Miller (June 1, 1889 – March 29, 1962) was a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1910 through 1922 for Brooklyn teams the Superbas (1910, 1913), Dodgers (1911–1912) and Robins (1914–1922). Nicknamed "Moonie", Miller batted and threw right-handed. In a 13-season career, Miller was a .245 hitter (695-for-2836) with five home runs and 231 RBIs in 927 games played, including 229 runs, 97 doubles, 33 triples, and 40 stolen bases. In eight postseason games, he went 3-for-22 for a .136 average. As a catcher, he collected 3870 outs with 1053 assists and committed 135 errors in 5058 chances for a .973 fielding percentage. His best season was 1920, when he posted a career-high .289 average and led National League catchers with .986 fielding percentage. Miller was also a participant in a historical play in the fifth inning of Game 5 of the 1920 World Series. He was tagged by Cleveland Indians second baseman Bill Wambsganss for the third out in the only unassisted triple play in World Series history.

William John Mullen (January 23, 1896 in St. Louis, Missouri – May 4, 1971) was a professional baseball player who played third base from 1920 to 1928 for the STL Browns, Detroit Tigers and Brooklyn Robins.

Born in Akron, Ohio, Munson was selected as the fourth pick of the 1968 MLB draft and was named as the catcher on the 1968 College Baseball All-American Team. Munson hit over .300 in his two seasons in the minor leagues, establishing himself as a top prospect. He became the Yankees' starting catcher late in the 1969 season, and after his first complete season in 1970, in which he batted .302, he was voted AL Rookie of the Year. Consi9dered the "heart and soul" of the Yankees, Munson was named captain of the Yankees in 1976, the team's first since Lou Gehrig. That same year, he won the AL MVP Award, making him the only Yankee to win the Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. Munson led the Yankees to three consecutive World Series appearances from 1976 to 1978, winning championships in the latter two years. He is the first player in baseball history to be named a College Baseball All-American and then in MLB win a Rookie of the Year Award, MVP Award, Gold Glove Award, and World Series championship. He is also the only catcher in MLB postseason history to record at least a .300+ batting average (.357). 20 RBIs (22), and 20 defensive caught stealing's (24). During an off day in the summer of 1969, Munson died at age 32 while practicing landing his Cessna Citation aircraft at Akron-Canton Airport. He suffered a broken neck as a result of the crash, and his cause of death was asphyxiations. The Yankees honored him immediately retiring his uniform 15, and dedicating a plaque to him in Monument Park.

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Bernard Edmund Neis (September 26, 1895 – November 29, 1972) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Brooklyn Robins, Boston Braves, Cleveland Indians, and Chicago White Sox between 1920 and 1927. He managed in the minor leagues in 1932 and 1933. In 677 games over eight seasons, Neis posted a .272 batting average (496-for-1825) with 297 runs, 25 home runs and 210 RBI. He recorded a .950 fielding percentage playing at all three outfield positions.

Louis Norman "Bobo" Newsom (August 11, 1907 – December 7, 1962) was an American starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Also known as "Buck", Newsom played for nine of the 16 then-existing big-league teams from 1929 through 1953 over all or parts of 20 seasons, appearing in an even 600 games pitched and 3,7591/3 innings pitched. Newsom pitched valiantly in a losing cause in Game Seven of the 1940 World Series with the Detroit Tigers, two days after pitching a shutout in honor of his father, who had died while visiting from South Carolina and watching his son win the opener. Bobo had said before pitching Game Five, "I'll win this one for my daddy." When manager Del Baker named Newsom to take the mound for Game Seven, Bobo was asked by reporters, "will you win this one for your daddy too?" "Why, no", Newsom said, "I think I'll win this one for old Bobo. Newsom's performance in 1941 was a disappointment, as he lost 20 games, winning only 12. When Tigers' general manager Jack Zeller negotiated a contract with Newsom, he said, "You'll have to take a salary cut, Newsom, since you lost 20 games last season." The plain-spoken Bobo, remembering what Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis had done to release players on minor-league teams that were under major-league teams' control, snapped, "Hell, you lost ninety-one of Briggs' [the team owner] ball players last year, and I don't see you taking no cut." Zeller was not amused and traded Newsom to the Washington Senators. Although Newsom pitched poorly in Game 3, allowing five runs in less than two innings, he garnered a Series ring while with the New York Yankees in 1947. In a 20-season career, Newsom posted a 211–222 record with 2082 strikeouts and a 3.98 ERA in 3759.3 innings pitched. He also made the American League All-Star team from 1938–1940 and in 1944. With 211 wins, he is one of the 100 winningest pitchers of all time. His 222 losses also make him one of only two major league pitchers to win 200 games and still have a sub .500 career winning percentage, the other being Jack Powell. Upon his retirement in 1953, he was the last major leaguer to have played in the 1920s to still be active. Newsom is one of only 29 players in baseball history to date to have appeared in Major League games in four decades.Al Benton is the only major-league pitcher to have faced both Babe Ruth and Mickey Mantle.[3] Newsom was the only other pitcher whose career spanned that of both hitters. He did face Ruth in 1934; however, in 1951, Mantle's first year, Newsom was out of the majors, and in 1952, Newsom never faced the Yankees—and the one time he faced them in 1953, Mantle was out of the lineup with an injury.

Ralph Foster "Cy" Perkins (February 27, 1896 – October 2, 1963) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics. He was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Perkins served as a catcher with the Philadelphia Athletics (1915, 1917–30), New York Yankees (1931) and Detroit Tigers (1934). He was the starting catcher for Philadelphia until Mickey Cochrane joined the team in 1925. After that Perkins served as a backup, being hailed as the man who taught Cochrane to catch without injuring his hands. He also was a member of the Athletics' World Series champion teams in 1929 and 1930. In 17 MLB seasons and 1,171 games played, Perkins was a .259 hitter with 933 hits, 175 doubles, 35 triples, 30 home runs, and 409 runs batted in. Following his playing career, Perkins coached for 17 years in the Major Leagues with the Yankees (1932–33), Tigers (1934–39) and Philadelphia Phillies (1946–54). He worked with two World Series champions, the Yankees of 1932 and the Tigers of 1935, and for two league pennant-winners, the 1934 Tigers and the 1950 Phillies. He also managed Detroit in 1937 (along with Cochrane and Del Baker) and posted a 6–9 record.

Americo Peter "Rico" Petrocelli (born June 27, 1943) is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 6 feet 0 inches (1.83 m) and 185 pounds (84 kg), he both threw and batted right-handed. Petrocelli spent all the 1965 season with Boston, playing in 103 games; he made 93 starts at shortstop. For the season, he batted .232 with 13 home runs and 33 RBIs. In 1966, Petrocelli batted .238 with 18 home runs and 59 RBIs in 139 games played. In 1967, Boston's "Impossible Dream" year, Petrocelli was selected to the All-Star game; he was the starting shortstop for the American League team, and went hitless in his one at bat. Petrocelli played in 142 regular season games, with 17 home runs, 66 RBIs, and a .259 average. In the 1967 World Series, he started all seven games, batting 4-for-20 (.200) with two home runs and three RBIs. Both of his home runs came in Game 6, off of Dick Hughes of the St. Louis Cardinals. Boston ultimately lost the series, four games to three. In 1968, Petrocelli played 123 games while batting .234 with 12 home runs and 46 RBIs. In 1969, he set a record (since broken) for home runs by a shortstop with 40; he had 97 RBIs and a career-high .297 average while playing 154 games. He also played in his second All-Star game, starting at shortstop for the American League squad and going 1-for-3 at the plate, with a double off of Jerry Koosman. Petrocelli led American League shortstops in fielding percentage in both 1968 and 1969, at .978 and .981, respectively. During his career with the Red Sox, Petrocelli hit 210 home runs with 773 RBIs and 653 runs scored in 1553 games played, with a .251 average. As of 2018, Petrocelli holds MLB's eighth-best all-time fielding percentage for third basemen (.970).[14] He was inducted to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 1997.

Delbert Rice Jr. (27 October 1922 – 26 January 1983) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played for 17 seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1945 to 1961, most notably for the St. Louis Cardinals. Although Rice was a relatively weak hitter, he sustained a lengthy career in the major leagues due to his valuable defensive abilities. A native of Portsmouth, Ohio, Rice attended Portsmouth High School where he starred in football, basketball and track as well as baseball.[2] He was contracted as an amateur free agent by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1941. Although Rice received his induction notice into the military in 1943, he was turned down because of a physical disqualification.[2] After playing in the minor leagues for four seasons, he made his major league debut with the Cardinals on 2 May, 1945 at the age of 22. Shortly after the season began, the Cardinals sold the contract for their star catcher, Walker Cooper to the New York Giants, leaving Rice to share catching duties with Ken O'Dea. Although they competed for the same job, the veteran O'Dea, who had played with Hall of Fame catcher Gabby Hartnett in Chicago during the 1930s, provided Rice with valuable help in learning the intricacies of catching in the major leagues. Rice posted a .261 batting average in 83 games as the Cardinals finished in second place, three games behind the Chicago Cubs. Although he served as a backup catcher to Joe Garagiola in 1946, he regularly played whenever Harry Brecheen pitched. The Cardinals ended the season tied for first place with the Brooklyn Dodgers and the two teams met in the 1946 National League tie-breaker series. It was the first playoff tiebreaker in Major League Baseball history. The Cardinals won the first two games of the best-of-three game series to capture the National League pennant. In the 1946 World Series against the Boston Red Sox, Rice caught all three of Brecheen's victories, as the Cardinals defeated the Red Sox in seven games. He was also the hitting standout in Game 2, with a single, a double and a walk, scoring two runs in the Cardinals' 3-0 victory. In 1947, Rice caught the majority of the team's games and guided the Cardinals' pitching staff to the lowest team earned run average and the most strikeouts in the National League, as the Cardinals finished in second place to the Dodgers. His pitch-calling skills were made evident once again in 1949, leading the Cardinals' pitching staff to the lowest team earned run average in the league, as the Cardinals once again finished in second place, one game behind the Dodgers. Rice had his best season in 1952, posting a .259 batting average along with 11 home runs and a career-high 65 runs batted in. He also led National League catchers in games played, putouts, assists and in baserunners caught stealing. The following season, Rice was named as a reserve player for the National League team in the 1953 All-Star Game.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez, nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American former professional baseball shortstop and third baseman. He played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers, and New York Yankees. Rodriguez began his professional career as one of the sport's most highly touted prospects and is considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Rodriguez amassed a .295 batting average, 696 home runs, over 2,000 RBI, over 2,000 runs scored, and over 3,000 hits. He is a 14-time All-Star and won three American League MVP Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodriguez is the career record holder for grand slams with 25. He signed two of the most lucrative sports contracts in history, but his career was highly controversial. He incurred criticism from the media for his behavior and the use of performance enhancing drugs.

Lynwood Thomas "Schoolboy" Rowe (January 11, 1910 – January 8, 1961) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, primarily for the Detroit Tigers (1932–42) and Philadelphia Phillies (1943, 1946–49). He was a three-time All-Star (1935, 1936 & 1947), and a member of three Tigers' World Series teams (1934, 1935 & 1940). Rowe also contributed to the Tigers' success in 1934 and 1935 with his hitting. In 1934, he hit for a .303 batting average and had eight doubles, two home runs, and 22 RBIs in 109 at bats. In 1935, he raised his average to .312 with three home runs and 28 RBIs in 109 at bats. In his fifteen seasons in the big leagues, Rowe hit eighteen home runs (14th best in major league history for a pitcher) and 153 RBIs. His career batting average was .263 (239-for-909).

George Napoleon "Nap" Rucker (September 30, 1884 – December 19, 1970) was a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Brooklyn Superbas/Dodgers/Robins. Over his 10 seasons, Rucker lead the league in Shutouts, Complete Game, and Innings Pitched throughout his career. On September 5, 1908, Rucker became the first left-handed pitcher to throw a no-hitter in Dodger history. Rucker threw a no-hitter against the Boston Doves on September 5, 1908 . He led the National League in complete games (27), innings pitched (320.1), and shutouts (6) in 1910. His best year was 1911, when he won 22 games for the Dodgers. He holds the Brooklyn Dodgers record for the most shutouts in the National League (38); most strikeouts (16) in a regulation nine-inning game, and the most 1-0 shutouts (3) in a 154-game season. He became strictly a knuckleball pitcher when his speed declined.

James Edward "Pete" Runnels (January 28, 1928 – May 20, 1991) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as an infielder for the Washington Senators (1951–57), Boston Red Sox (1958–62) and Houston Colt .45s (1963–64). Runnels was a five-time All-Star player during his tenure with the Red Sox and, is notable for being a two-time American League batting champion. He was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2004. A master at handling the bat, he was a notorious singles hitter who had one of the best eyes in the game, compiling an outstanding 1.35 walk-to-strikeout ratio (844-to-627). Altogether, he batted over .300 six times, once with the Senators, five with the Red Sox. Despite winning the batting title in 1960, he drove in just 35 runs, a record low for a batting title winner. Solid and versatile with the glove, Runnels started as a shortstop with the Senators, but ultimately played 644 games at first base, 642 at second, 463 at shortstop, and 49 at third. Twice he led the American League in fielding percentage, at second base in 1960 (.986), and at first base in 1961 (.995). He was not a good base stealer: in 1952 he set the record for most attempted steals with no successes, at 10. In his career he stole 37 bases and was caught 51 times. In five seasons with Boston, Runnels never hit less than .314 (1959), winning two batting crowns in 1960 (.320) and 1962 (.326), and just missed the 1958 American League Batting Crown by six points to his teammate Ted Williams on the final day of the 1958 season (.328 to .322). On August 30, 1960, in a double-header against the Tigers, Runnels hit 6-for-7 in the first game (including a game-winning RBI–double in the 15th inning) and 3-for-4 in the second, tying a Major League record for hits in a double-header (9). In 1962, Runnels played in his third All-Star Game for the American League and hit a home run off the Philadelphia Phillies' Art Mahaffey.[2] He went on to win the American League batting title that year. But after the season, Runnels was traded to the Houston Colt .45s (forerunners of the Astros) in exchange for outfielder Román Mejías.[3] Runnels was released by Houston early in the 1964 season. Runnels was a career .291 hitter (1854-for-6373) with 49 home runs, 630 RBI, 876 runs, 282 doubles, 64 triples, 37 stolen bases, and a .375 on-base percentage in 1799 games. He was selected an All-Star in 1959, 1960 and 1962. He also coached for the Red Sox in 1965–1966, serving as an interim manager for the last 16 games of the 1966 season. Under Runnels, the Sox played .500 baseball and escaped last place by one-half game. However, he was replaced by Dick Williams for the 1967 season.

Still an American icon decades after his death, George Herman "Babe" Ruth emerged from humble beginnings to become the game's greatest slugger and gate attraction. Ruth hit home runs at a prodigious rate - his single season output often exceeded those of entire major league teams. He retired with 714 career home runs, at a time when only tow other players had reached 300. He also posted a record of 94-46 in 163 games as a pitcher, most coming before he became a regular in the outfield. Reggie Jackson once deflected a comparison to "The Sultan of Swat," saying, "There will never be another Babe Ruth. He was the greatest home run hitter who ever lived." Elected 1936.

John Clement Schulte (September 8, 1896 – June 28, 1978) was an American catcher and longtime coach in professional baseball. Schulte's professional playing career began in 1915. It lasted for 15 seasons and was interrupted by two years (1917–18) in military service during World War I. He played for five Major League Baseball teams over all or parts of five seasons: the St. Louis Browns (1923 and 1932), St. Louis Cardinals (1927), Philadelphia Phillies (1928), Chicago Cubs (1929) and Boston Braves (1932). Altogether, he appeared in 192 games, hitting .264 with 98 hits, including 15 doubles, four triples and 14 home runs. His best year, as a second-string catcher for the 1927 Cardinals, saw him set personal bests in most offensive categories. In Chicago, he was a reserve catcher on the 1929 National League champions and played under Joe McCarthy, whom he would later serve as a longtime coach. After his maiden coaching assignment with the Cubs in 1933, Schulte joined McCarthy and the New York Yankees beginning in 1934. He coached 15 full seasons (1934–48) in the Bronx, even serving under Bill Dickey, Johnny Neun and Bucky Harris after McCarthy's retirement in May 1946. The Yankees won seven World Series titles and eight American League pennants during Schulte's decade and a half as a coach.

Cut SHAUTE, JOE NM-MT 8

Joseph Benjamin Shaute (August 1, 1899 in Peckville, Pennsylvania – February 21, 1970 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched from 1922 to 1934, and during his 13-year career, he played primarily for the Cleveland Indians. He attended Juniata College and Mansfield University of Pennsylvania. He made his major league debut in September 1922, and threw his first pitch to legendary swatter Babe Ruth. Baseball historian William C. Kashatus noted that when Shaute came to the pitching mound, "the Indians were clinging to a one-run lead in the bottom of the eighth with two outs and bases loaded with Yankees". Shaute gained notoriety when he struck out Ruth on four pitches to end the inning.[1] In the following inning, he faced another powerful hitter, Bob Meusel, who "swung so hard on Shaute's first offering that he whirled completely around and fell to the ground". The pitcher next struck out Yankee catcher Freddie Hoffman. Kashatus observed that Shaute "continued to dominate Ruth for the next three years". The situation changed in 1927, however, when Ruth hit 60 home runs, setting a major league record that stood for more than seven decades.[1] Ruth hit three of those home runs—numbers 30, 40, and 52—off of Shaute. Nevertheless, during his 13-season career, Shaute struck out Ruth on more than 30 occasions. Shaute enjoyed his best season in 1924, "when he won 20 games for the lowly Indians who finished sixth that year".

Urbain Jacques Shockcor (September 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), known as Urban James Shocker was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees and St. Louis Browns between 1916 and 1928. Shocker, known as one of the last legal spitball pitchers, led the American League (AL)—and set the Browns record—in 1921 with 27 wins, and won at least 20 games 4 seasons in a row from 1920 to 1923. At the time of his retirement he was the Browns all-time leader in wins with 126 and shutouts with 23. hocker was born in Cleveland, Ohio to Anna and William Shockor and relocated to Michigan some time later. Shocker began his career in the Border League where he played as a catcher. In 1913, when he played for the Windsor team in the Border League, he broke one of his fingers on his right hand; when the finger healed it became hooked which allowed him to throw a breaking ball as well as his spitter. As a prelude to his major league career, Shocker was demoted by the Yankees for seasoning and improvement, and he spent most of the 1916 season playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs (International League) in the International League, where he posted a marvelous 15–3 record and strung together 54 consecutive scoreless innings. His scoreless inning streak and 1.31 ERA for the campaign both still stand as International League records. He was called up by the Yankees and played with them through the 1917 season. That winter, Miller Huggins engineered a trade of Shocker to the Browns which he very much came to regret. However, Shocker rejoined Huggins and the Yankees in 1925. In March 1918 his draft number came up and he reported for service on May 31 of that year. After he served overseas, he returned to the Browns in April 1919. The right-handed hurler had four consecutive 20-win seasons with the Browns in the early 1920s, during which he was one of the dominant pitchers in baseball. Urban was the last Yankees pitcher to legally throw a spitball, as he and a handful of other pitchers were grandfathered to continue the practice after it was banned by baseball in 1920. Shocker lived with a heart condition so severe some books say he had to sleep either sitting or standing up. By the early fall of 1927, he was too ill to maintain his place in the starting lineup. His career totals for 412 games include a 187–117 record, a .615 winning percentage, 317 games started, 200 complete games, 28 shutouts, 72 games finished, 25 saves, and an ERA of 3.17 in 2,681.2 innings pitched. He compiled a career .209 batting average (167-798) with 89 runs scored and 70 RBI. He was a good fielding pitcher in his era, committing only 15 errors in 769 total chances for a .980 fielding percentage.

Hilton Smith often found himself in the shadow of the legendary Negro League pitcher Satchel Paige - not because of lack of skill, but rather Smith's quiet laid-back personality. "There was nobody better in this whole world (than Hilton)," declared Negro League legend Buck O'Neil. Smith, credited with 20-or-more wins in each of his 12 seasons with the Kansas City Monarchs, played in six consecutive East-West All-Star Games between 1937 and 1942. He also helped lead the Monarchs to seven pennants. Elected 2001.

Carl Reginald Smith (born April 2, 1945) is an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder and afterwards served as a coach and front office executive. He also played in the Nippon Professional Baseball league for two seasons at the end of his playing career. During a seventeen-year major league career (1966–1982), Smith appeared in 1,987 games, hit 314 home runs and batted .287. He was a switch-hitter who threw right-handed. In his prime, he had one of the strongest throwing arms of any outfielder in the big leagues. Smith played at least 70 games in 13 different seasons, and in every one of those 13 seasons, his team had a winning record. Smith grew up in Los Angeles. He won the International League batting title in 1966 with a .320 average while playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs. He was called up to the major leagues late in that season and played for the Boston Red Sox (1966–73), St. Louis Cardinals (1974–76), Los Angeles Dodgers (1976–81) and San Francisco Giants (1982). Smith appeared in four World Series, including during his rookie 1967 season for the Red Sox, and three (1977, 1978 and 1981) for the Dodgers. He hit three home runs in the 1977 series. In the 1978 season, Dodger pitcher Don Sutton went public with comments that Smith was a more valuable player to the Dodgers than the more-celebrated Steve Garvey. This led to an infamous clubhouse wrestling match between Sutton and Garvey. In the 1981 season as a member of the Dodgers, Smith was taunted by Giants fan Michael Dooley, who then threw a batting helmet at him. Smith then jumped into the stands at Candlestick Park and started punching him. He was ejected from the game, and Dooley was arrested.[1] Five months later, Smith joined the Giants as a free agent. He spent one season in San Francisco, then moved on to Japan with the Yomiuri Giants for two seasons before retiring in 1984.

The game's premier pitcher of the 1870s, A.G. Spalding led the league in victories in each of his six full seasons. His 47 wins in 1876 keyed the Chicago White Stockings' drive to the inaugural National League championship. One year later, he turned his boundless energies to the sporting goods business and executive roles with the White Stockings, where he gained renown as the era's top promoter of baseball as the national game, "The genius of our institutions is democratic," Spalding maintained. "Baseball is a democratic game." Elected 1939.

One of the most prolific home run hitters in the Negro Leagues, Norman "Turkey" Stearns spent his summers blasting baseballs for the Detroit Stars and his winters laboring in the Motor City's auto plants. Satchel Paige called the left-handed Stearns "one of the greatest hitters we ever had, as good as anybody who ever played." Stearns generated his power with strong shoulders and an unusual , open stance. A swift center fielder renowned for his fielding, Stearnes was regarded by "Cool Papa" Bell as "one of the best all-around ballplayers. Elected 2000.

Vernon Decatur Stephens (October 23, 1920 – November 3, 1968) was an American shortstop in professional baseball who played 15 seasons in the American League for four teams. He was born in McAlister, New Mexico while his parents were en route from Oklahoma to California. Stephens batted and threw right-handed. He was also nicknamed "Little Slug", "Junior", and "Buster". Ted Williams credited him with being the most effective of those who followed him in the Red Sox batting order. During his stint with the Red Sox he outshone Bobby Doerr, a Hall-of-famer, who followed him in the Sox batting order. In 1949 he hit 39 home runs, second only to Williams that year in the American League, while batting in 159 runs tying Williams for the league lead. The next closest American Leaguers hit 24 home runs that year while Doerr hit 18. In his book "Summer of '49" author David Halberstam seems to go great lengths to belittle Stephens' 1949 performance while exalting that of Doerr which was patently unfair. One of the strongest-hitting shortstops in major league history, Stephens compiled a .286 batting average with 247 home runs and 1174 RBI in 1720 games. Breaking with American Major League baseball, Stephens signed a five-year contract with the Mexican League in 1946. He had been in Mexico only a few days when his father, a minor league umpire, and the Browns scout Jack Fournier drove down and brought him back to the United States. In August 2008, he was named as one of the ten former players who began their careers before 1943 to be considered by the Veterans Committee for induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 2009. He was not selected. Doerr was a member of the selection committee.

John Lawrence Sullivan (October 15, 1858 – February 2, 1918), known simply as John L. among his admirers, and dubbed the "Boston Strong Boy" by the press, was an Irish-American boxer recognized as the first lineal heavyweight champion of gloved boxing, de facto reigning from February 7, 1882, to 1892. He is also generally recognized as the last heavyweight champion of bare-knuckle boxing under the London Prize Ring Rules, being the cultural icon of the late 19th century America, arguably the first boxing superstar and one of the world's highest-paid athletes of his era. Newspapers coverage of his career, with latest accounts of his championship fights often appeared in the headlines, and as cover stories, gave birth for the sports journalism in the United States and set the pattern internationally for covering boxing events in media, and photodocumenting the prizefights.

Myles Lewis Thomas (October 22, 1897 – December 12, 1963) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He was born in State College, Pennsylvania. He threw and batted right-handed, and he was also 5 ft 9.5 in (1.77 m) tall and 170 pounds. He was nicknamed "Duck Eye" by Babe Ruth. On April 18, 1926 at the age of 28, he made his major league debut with the New York Yankees. On June 15, 1929, he was purchased from the Yankees by the Washington Senators. Overall, he went 23–22 with a 4.64 career ERA. As a batter, he hit a respectable (for a pitcher) .240. He had a career .955 fielding percentage. In the postseason, he had a 3.00 ERA in 2 games.

James Francis Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk): Wa-Tho-Huk, translated as "Bright Path";[4] May 22 or 28,[2] 1887 – March 28, 1953)[5] was an American athlete and Olympic gold medalist. A member of the Sac and Fox Nation, Thorpe became the first Native American to win a gold medal for the United States. Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals in the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, and played American football (collegiate and professional), professional baseball, and basketball. He lost his Olympic titles after it was found he had been paid for playing two seasons of semi-professional baseball before competing in the Olympics, thus violating the amateurism rules that were then in place. In 1983, 30 years after his death, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) restored his Olympic medals.

Robert Trowbridge (June 27, 1930 – April 3, 1980) was an American professional baseball player, a pitcher who appeared in all or parts of five seasons (1956–60) for the Milwaukee Braves and Kansas City Athletics. A right-hander, he was listed as 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and 180 pounds (82 kg). He was a member of the 1957 World Series champion Braves. After he followed that by posting a 13–8 record in Triple-A in 1955, Trowbridge made the Braves' MLB roster in 1956 out of spring training. He was used sparingly as a relief pitcher in the season's early weeks and sent back to Triple-A in May to get more work. Recalled at the end of June, he became a "swing man" on the Milwaukee pitching staff, getting four starts and 13 relief assignments over the rest of the season. He notched his first MLB complete game on August 8 in a six-hit, 10–1 triumph over the St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee County Stadium. As a rookie, he posted a career-best 2.66 earned run average in 502/3 innings pitched. In 1957, Trowbridge worked in 32 games as a member of the Brave staff, sandwiched around a three-game stint at Triple-A. He won a MLB-career-high seven games and worked in 126 innings, another career mark. Trowbridge again was a swing man, with 16 starts and 16 relief appearances. On September 2, he threw a complete game shutout, a three-hitter against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field, striking out nine.[3] It would be the only shutout of his big-league career. But his seven victories contributed to the Braves' 1957 National League pennant, their first title in nine years and their first in Milwaukee. In the 1957 World Series, he appeared in one inning in relief of Game 3. Inheriting a 7–3 deficit to the New York Yankees, Trowbridge allowed only two hits, but he issued three bases on balls and surrendered five earned runs, three of them coming on a home run by Tony Kubek.[4] It would be his only Fall Classic appearance, but the Braves triumphed in seven games to become world champions. His first two major league seasons would prove to be Trowbridge's best. He spent all of both 1958 and 1959 with Milwaukee, but worked in only 43 total games (with four starts), and was not called upon when the Braves made a return trip to the World Series in 1958. His final appearance in 1959, and as a Brave, occurred on August 18, five weeks before Milwaukee met the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1959 National League tie-breaker series. The Braves sold Trowbridge's contract during the 1959–60 off-season to the Kansas City Athletics, a second-division team in the American League, and he finished his MLB career there in 1960, making one start and relieving in 21 other games before being sent to Triple-A. He ended his pro career in 1961. As a major leaguer, Trowbridge compiled a 13–13 record with a 3.95 earned run average and 201 strikeouts in 116 appearances and 3301/3 innings pitched, allowing 324 hits and 156 bases on balls. He had four complete games, one shutout and five saves.

George Edward Martin Van Haltren (March 30, 1866 – October 1, 1945) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball. In his 17-year career, lasting from 1887 through 1903, he played for the Chicago White Stockings, Brooklyn Ward's Wonders, Baltimore Orioles, Pittsburgh Pirates, and New York Giants. He also served as player-manager of the Orioles in 1892. It would be hyperbolic to say that George Van Haltren was bona fide Hall of Fame material. But the pitcher-turned-outfielder has been called the "premier leadoff man" of his era. From 1887 to 1903, Van Haltren batted a career .316 with over 2,500 hits, nearly 600 stolen bases and almost 900 walks! Some even credit him with inventing the "Baltimore Chop," a style of bounding grounder made notorious by Ned Hanlon's Orioles. Later, under his mentor Monte Ward, Van Haltren played for the Giants in the legendary 1894 Temple Cup.

James Leslie "Hippo" Vaughn was a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. In a career that spanned thirteen seasons, he played for the New York Highlanders, the Washington Senators, and the Chicago Cubs. Vaughn won over 20 games in give seasons for the Cubs. His highlight year was 1918, where he won a National League leading 22 inn 1918, when the season was ended a month early due to government restrictions brought on by World War I. That same year Vaughn also led the National League in earned run average and strikeouts to become the ninth triple crown winner in the modern era and the fifteenth overall. His nickname of "Hippo" came from his height and weight of 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds.

James Leslie "Hippo" Vaughn was a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. In a career that spanned thirteen seasons, he played for the New York Highlanders, the Washington Senators, and the Chicago Cubs. Vaughn won over 20 games in give seasons for the Cubs. His highlight year was 1918, where he won a National League leading 22 inn 1918, when the season was ended a month early due to government restrictions brought on by World War I. That same year Vaughn also led the National League in earned run average and strikeouts to become the ninth triple crown winner in the modern era and the fifteenth overall. His nickname of "Hippo" came from his height and weight of 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds.

Edward Stephen Waitkus (September 4, 1919 – September 16, 1972) was a Lithuanian American first baseman in Major League Baseball who had an 11-year career (1941, 1946–1955). He played for the Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies in the National League and for the Baltimore Orioles of the American League. He was elected to the National League All-Star team twice (1948 and 1949). Waitkus continued his resurgence in the 1950 Philadelphia Phillies season as the leadoff hitter for the Whiz Kids team that won the 1950 National League Pennant. Waitkus led the team in scoring with 102 runs. Waitkus made his only post-season appearance in the 1950 World Series. After the 1950 season, Waitkus was named the Associated Press Comeback Player of the Year.

Samuel Filmore West (October 5, 1904 – November 23, 1985) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams from 1927 to 1942. West batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Longview, Texas. West entered the majors in 1927 with the Washington Senators, playing six years for them before moving to the St. Louis Browns (1933–1938), again with Washington (1938–1941), and the Chicago White Sox (1942). His most productive season came in 1931 when he posted a career-high .333 batting average and reached career highs in slugging percentage (.481), hits (175), doubles (43), triples (13), and rbi (91). In 1933, he was selected to the first All-Star Game ever played, being selected again in 1934, 1935 and 1937. During his career, West collected a .300 average during eight seasons; led AL outfielders in putouts twice, double plays three times, and assists once, and four times was considered in the AL Most Valuable Player vote. Although he played with Washington during ten seasons, he missed the American League pennant-winning team that lost the 1933 World Series to the New York Giants after being traded to the Browns in exchange for Goose Goslin. In a sixteen-season career, West was a .299 hitter (1838-for-6148) with 75 home runs and 838 RBI in 1753 games, including 934 runs, 347 doubles, 101 triples, 53 stolen bases, a .371 on-base percentage, and a .425 slugging percentage. Defensively, he posted a .983 fielding percentage. Following his playing career, West served in the U.S. Army during World War II. After discharge from the service, he spent three years as a coach with the Senators.

Edwin Dibrell Williams (January 19, 1910 – April 2, 1992) was an American second baseman and shortstop in Major League Baseball who played from 1930 to 1935 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox. Born in Greenbrier, Arkansas, he played in the 1931 World Series with the Athletics. He died at age 82 in Searcy, Arkansas. He compiled a .267 batting average (421-1574) with 198 runs, 29 home runs, and 201 RBI in a six-year, 475 game career.

George Wright was an accomplished cricket player who helped transform baseball into the National Pastime. Wright was a star on the first all-professional team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings. In addition to possessing excellent hitting skills, Wright revolutionized the role of the shortstop. Hall of Famer Jim O'Rourke said, "George Wright never had any equal as a fielder, base runner and batsman, combined with heady work of a quality never accredited to any ball tosser. All his qualifications taken together, he was really in a class by himself." Elected 1937.

Charles Carroll Yerkes (June 13, 1903 – December 20, 1950) was a professional baseball pitcher. Over the course of five seasons in Major League Baseball, he played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1927–29) and Chicago Cubs (1932–33).

Edward Frederick Joseph Yost (October 13, 1926 – October 16, 2012) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played the majority of his Major League Baseball career as a third baseman for the Washington Senators, then played two seasons each with the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels before retiring in 1962. He was nicknamed the "Walking Man" for the numerous bases on balls he drew, and continues to rank 11th all-time among major leaguers in that category, ahead of the likes of Pete Rose, Willie Mays, Stan Musial and Hank Aaron. Yost was considered one of the best lead off men and third basemen of his era. Yost was born in Brooklyn, New York where he played baseball and basketball at New York University (NYU) before being signed by the Washington Senators as an amateur free agent in 1944. He made his Major League debut with the Senators at the age of 17 on August 16, 1944, having never played in the minor leagues. Yost spent the 1945 season in the United States Navy before returning to the Senators in 1946. In 1950, Yost posted career-highs with a .295 batting average and a .440 on-base percentage. In 1951 he led the American League with 36 doubles and produced a career-high 65 runs batted in. He earned a place as a reserve player for the American League team in the 1952 All-Star Game.[11] Between August 30, 1949 and May 11, 1955, Yost played in 829 consecutive games for the Senators, the ninth longest consecutive game streak in major league history. Yost's home run totals were diminished by having to play his home games in Washington's cavernous Griffith Stadium. Between 1944 and 1953, he hit only 3 home runs at home while hitting 52 home runs on the road. On December 6, 1958, after 14 seasons with the Senators, Yost was traded to the Detroit Tigers, allowing the Senators to make room for young prospect Harmon Killebrew. Playing in hitter-friendly Tiger Stadium in 1959, his home run production climbed to a career-high of 21 and, he led the American League with 115 runs scored, 135 base on balls and a .435 on-base percentage. In 1960, he again led the league in base on balls and on-base percentage. Yost spent two seasons with the Tigers before being selected by the Los Angeles Angels in the 1961 American League expansion draft. While with the Angels during their inaugural season, Yost earned the distinction of being the first Angels player to appear in a major league game, leading off in the team's first game, played at Baltimore on April 11, 1961. In his last plate appearance as a major league player, he received a base on balls.

As a player, manger and owner, Cumberland "Cum" Posey was the driving force behind the Homestead Grays - one of the most successful teams in the Negro Leagues history - for 35 years - Posey's business acumen and organizational skills made the Grays a perennial powerhouse and money-making machine. Skilled at talent evaluation and development, Posey's teams produced a number of future Hall of Famers. Homestead split its "home" games between Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., regularly drawing 25,000 to 30,000 fans at Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. His teams won nine consecutive Negro National League pennants from 1937 to 1945, including three championships. Elected 2006

As a player, manger and owner, Cumberland "Cum" Posey was the driving force behind the Homestead Grays - one of the most successful teams in the Negro Leagues history - for 35 years - Posey's business acumen and organizational skills made the Grays a perennial powerhouse and money-making machine. Skilled at talent evaluation and development, Posey's teams produced a number of future Hall of Famers. Homestead split its "home" games between Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., regularly drawing 25,000 to 30,000 fans at Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. His teams won nine consecutive Negro National League pennants from 1937 to 1945, including three championships. Elected 2006

Henry Ludwig "Hank" Borowy (May 12, 1916 – August 23, 2004) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. From 1942 through 1951, Borowy played for the New York Yankees (1942–45), Chicago Cubs (1945–48), Philadelphia Phillies (1949–50), Pittsburgh Pirates (1950) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). He batted and threw right-handed. Born in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Borowy graduated from Bloomfield High School and Fordham University. He pitched in six World Series games and posted a 108–82 record with 690 strikeouts and a 3.50 earned run average (ERA) in 1,717 innings. Borowy debuted on April 18, 1942 with the Yankees, finishing with a 15–4 record, 85 strikeouts and a 2.82 ERA. He started Game 4 of the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals and did not receive a decision. In 1943, Borowy went 14–9 with 107 strikeouts and a 2.82 ERA and won Game 3 of the World Series against St. Louis. Named an All-Star in 1944, he pitched three scoreless innings in the game, ending the season with a 17–12 record, 107 strikeouts and a 2.64 ERA. In 1945 Borowy posted a 10–5 record with the Yankees in the first half of the season. The 1945 All Star game was cancelled due to wartime travel restrictions, but Borowy was selected a "virtual" All Star in an unofficial poll of managers conducted by the Associated Press. At the All-Star break he was placed on waivers by the Yankees, and eventually sold to the Cubs for $100,000 ($1,391,682 in current dollar terms). Borowy went 11–2 for the remainder of the season, including three wins over the Cardinals down the stretch, and led the National League in winning percentage (.846) and ERA (2.14), as the Cubs won the pennant. His combined 1945 Yankees/Cubs record was 21–7 with 82 strikeouts and a 2.65 ERA. Borowy is one of two pitchers in major league history to win at least 10 games for two different teams in the same season (the other is Bartolo Colón, with the Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos, in 2002). On October 3, 1945, the Detroit Tigers and Cubs met in the World Series for the fourth time. In the opener Borowy pitched a six-hit, 9–0 shutout. He lost the fifth game, and then came back to win the sixth with four scoreless relief innings. Borowy started the final game on one day's rest but gave up hits to the first three batters before leaving. He took the loss and the Tigers won the Series. Before the 2016 World Series, Borowy was the last Chicago Cubs pitcher to win a World Series game. He is also the fourth and last pitcher to hit two doubles in the same inning, on May 5, 1946. The previous three pitchers were Fred Goldsmith, Joe Wood, and Ted Lyons. For the remainder of his career, Borowy was plagued by finger blisters and a chronic sore shoulder. He pitched his final game on September 14, 1951. Just prior to his retirement, he performed one of the worst pitching performances ever seen in Major League baseball. Playing against the St Louis Browns on the 18th of August, Borowy was called up to pitch in the botto

Kenneth Alphonse Heintzelman (October 14, 1915 – August 14, 2000) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of 13 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1937–42 and 1946–47) and Philadelphia Phillies (1947–52). Heintzelman, who was born in Peruque, Missouri, was originally signed by the Boston Braves in 1935, and was acquired by the Pirates the following year. Heintzelman lost three full seasons in the prime of his career, serving in the army in WWII. Heintzelman's best season statistically was in 1949 when he finished 9th in voting for the National League MVP for leading the league in shutouts (5) and having a 17–10 win-loss record, 33 games (32 started), 15 complete games, 250 innings pitched, 239 hits allowed, 96 runs allowed, 84 earned runs allowed, 19 home runs allowed, 93 walks allowed, 65 strikeouts, 1 hit batsmen, 2 wild pitches, 1,041 batters faced, a 3.02 ERA and a 1.328 WHIP. The following season, he was a member of the Phillies National League pennant winners, and started game 3 of the World Series. In 13 seasons Heintzelman had a 77–98 win-loss record, 319 games (183 started), 66 complete games, 18 shutouts, 72 games finished, 10 saves, 1,5012/3 innings pitched, 1,540 hits allowed, 746 runs allowed, 656 earned runs allowed, 100 home runs allowed, 630 walks allowed, 564 strikeouts, 14 hit batsmen, 33 wild pitches, 6,497 batters faced, 4 balks, a 3.93 ERA and a 1.445 WHIP.

Suffering from epilepsy and haunted by his experience in combat during World War I, Grover Cleveland "Pete" Alexander still managed to win 373 games during a 20-year career. He led the National League in ERA on five occasions, wins in six seasons, complete games six times and shutouts during seven campaigns. Alexander also won 30-or-more games in three consecutive seasons. Elected 1938.

Scrappy Nellie Fox was a catalyst for the "Go-Go" Chicago White Sox of the 1950's. The 15-time All-Star was the 1959 American League Most Valuable Player, leading Chicago to its first World Series in 40 years. He led the AL in hits four times and fewest strikeouts 11 times. New York Yankees ace Whitey Ford said, "In 12 years, I struck him out once....and I think the umpire blew the call," a comment lament of pitchers who had to face the pesky left. Fox captured three Gold Glove Awards and set a major league record for consecutive games played at second base. Elected 1997.

Scrappy Nellie Fox was a catalyst for the "Go-Go" Chicago White Sox of the 1950's. The 15-time All-Star was the 1959 American League Most Valuable Player, leading Chicago to its first World Series in 40 years. He led the AL in hits four times and fewest strikeouts 11 times. New York Yankees ace Whitey Ford said, "In 12 years, I struck him out once....and I think the umpire blew the call," a comment lament of pitchers who had to face the pesky left. Fox captured three Gold Glove Awards and set a major league record for consecutive games played at second base. Elected 1997.

Michael Franklin "Pinky" Higgins (May 27, 1909 – March 21, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager, front office executive and scout in Major League Baseball who played for three teams and served as manager or general manager of the Boston Red Sox during the period of 1955 through 1965. Higgins was born in Red Oak, Texas. He was nicknamed "Pinky" as a baby, and according to some reports detested it. Alternatively, he was called by either of his given names. He signed some autographs as Frank Higgins, but was predominantly known as Mike, especially later in his career. Higgins graduated from W. H. Adamson High School in Dallas, where he played on the 1926 state championship runner-up team. He attended the University of Texas at Austin before beginning his career with the Philadelphia Athletics on June 25, 1930. After only 24 at bats that year, he did not play in the majors again until 1933, when he began to play full-time for the A's. In his rookie season of 1933, he batted .314 with 13 home runs and 99 RBIs. He hit for the cycle on August 3 in a 12–8 win over the Washington Senators. The A's of that year finished third in the American League. By 1938, when he was traded to the Boston Red Sox for fellow third baseman Billy Werber, he was not only considered one of the better-hitting third basemen in the league but led them in batting average in 1933 and 1934. In his first two years with the Bosox (1937 and 1938), he hit over .300 with a career-high 106 RBIs in both years. In June 1938, he set (and still holds) a major league record with base hits in 12 consecutive at bats, accomplishing the feat over 14 plate appearances because he also received two bases on balls during that streak. His mark was tied by Walt Dropo in 1952, who made his 12 straight knocks in 12 appearances, with no bases on balls in between. He would next head to the Detroit Tigers in a trade for submarine pitcher Elden Auker, where he would spend the majority of his playing career. It was also where his hitting numbers dropped while his power numbers still stayed fairly strong, but not in the same realm as his career-high of 23 homers with Philadelphia in 1935. Boston got Higgins back in mid-1946 as the team's regular third baseman, winning the AL pennant by 12 games (but losing the 1946 World Series to the Cardinals in seven). The Red Sox then released him, and he retired to become a manager in the Red Sox farm system. His final numbers included a .292 batting average with 140 home runs and 1,075 RBIs. He accumulated 1,941 career hits in 6,636 at bats, and made the All-Star team three times (1934, '36, '44).

Charles Hebert Klein was a powerful hitter who captured the Triple Crown in 1933, also nabbing three other home run titles. A .320 hitter in 17 seasons, Klein totaled 300 home runs and was named to the first two National League All-Star teams (1933 and 1934). Strong enough to wield a 42-once bat, Klein possessed all-around talent as a superb defensive right fielder. The 1932 NL MVP, Klein four years later became the first 20th-centruy player in the senior circuit to slug four home runs in a game. Elected 1980.

Walter O'Malley was among one of the most influential baseball team owners of the last half of the 20th century. he was a persuasive and visionary businessman who altered the big league landscape with seismic force by moving his Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. Thwarted in attempts to replace an outdated Ebbets Field, O'Malley led baseball's geographic expansion west after the 1957 season by relocating his team to California, while convincing the New York Giants to follow suit. Under O'Malley's ownership, the Dodgers became the "gold standard" of baseball franchises winning 11 pennants and four World Series titles. Elected 2008.

Charles Culbertson Robertson (January 31, 1896 – August 23, 1984) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher, and is best remembered for throwing a perfect game in 1922. He was the last surviving player who played at least one game for the 1919 Chicago White Sox, having died in 1984. Robertson was born in Dexter, Texas, grew up in Nocona, Texas, and graduated from Nocona High School in 1915. Charles attended Austin College from 1917 until 1919. He began his career with the Chicago White Sox in 1919 at the age of 23. Robertson was an average player for most of his career, having a career record of 49–80[1] and never winning more than he lost during a single season. His main pitch throughout his career was a slow curveball which he often threw on the first pitch to a batter on any side of the plate, followed by a fastball up in the zone. On April 30, 1922, in just his fourth career start, he pitched the fifth perfect game in baseball history against the Detroit Tigers at Navin Field (later known as Tiger Stadium) in Detroit. He became the first pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game on the road. The Detroit lineup featured such Hall of Famers as Ty Cobb and Harry Heilmann, who both complained that he was doctoring the ball throughout the game. A spectacular diving catch by Johnny Mostil on a liner to left by Bobby Veach in the second inning preserved the historic feat. The Tigers submitted several game balls to American League President Ban Johnson after the game to check for irregularities, but Johnson dismissed the charge. No pitcher would equal the feat after Robertson for another 34 years, until Don Larsen in the 1956 World Series; the next regular season perfect game would not come until Jim Bunning's perfect game in 1964.

Gino Nicholas Cimoli (December 18, 1929 – February 12, 2011) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Brooklyn / Los Angeles Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Milwaukee Braves, Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, and Los Angeles Angels from 1956 through 1965. He was an MLB All-Star in 1957, and a member of the 1960 World Series champions.

Connie Mack won five World Series titles, a record nine American League pennants, and 3,731 games, nearly 1,00o more than any other manager in history. Still, "The Tall Tactician," is best remembered as a dignified leader who donned a business suit to dispense wisdom to a generation of players. "Your born with two strikes against you, so don't take a third one on your own," Mack was fond of stating to his clubs. Though his entrance to baseball came by playing catcher for 11 seasons, in 1901 Mack assumed control of the Philadelphia Athletics, the team he would lead for the next 50 years. Elected 1937.

Donald Arthur Mattingly (born April 20, 1961) is an American former professional baseball first baseman, coach and current manager for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Nicknamed "The Hit Man" and "Donnie Baseball", he spent his entire 14-year career playing with the New York Yankees and later managed the Los Angeles Dodgers for five years. Mattingly graduated from Reitz Memorial High School in Evansville, Indiana, and was selected by the Yankees in the amateur draft. Debuting with the Yankees in 1982 after three seasons in minor league baseball, Mattingly emerged as the Yankees' starting first baseman after a successful rookie season in 1983. Mattingly was named to the American League (AL) All-Star team six times. He won nine Gold Glove Awards (an American League record for a first baseman), three Silver Slugger Awards, the 1984 AL batting title, and was the 1985 AL Most Valuable Player. Mattingly served as captain of the Yankees from 1991 through 1995, when he retired as a player. The Yankees later retired Mattingly's uniform number, 23. Mattingly is the only Yankee to have his number retired without having won a World Series with the team. Returning to the Yankees as a coach in 2004 for manager Joe Torre, he followed Torre to the Dodgers in 2008, and succeeded him as the Dodgers' manager in 2011. The Dodgers and Mattingly mutually parted ways after the 2015 season, and he became manager of the Miami Marlins.

John Samuel Vander Meer (November 2, 1914 – October 6, 1997) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher, most notably for the Cincinnati Reds. Vander Meer is best known for being the only pitcher in Major League Baseball history to throw two consecutive no-hitters. After the impressive start to his major league career, he experienced problems controlling the accuracy of his pitching, and his later career was marked by inconsistent performances. Vander Meer made his major league debut with the Cincinnati Reds on April 22, 1937 at the age of 22.[1] He won 3 games and lost 4 before being sent back to the minor leagues with the Syracuse Chiefs for most of the season when the Reds recalled him in September. The following year on June 11, 1938, Vander Meer pitched a no hitter against the Boston Bees. Four days later against the Brooklyn Dodgers in what was the first night game ever held at Ebbets Field, he threw another no hitter, becoming the only player in major league history to throw two consecutive no-hitters, a historic record that has never been tied and almost certainly will never be beaten.

John Junior Roseboro (May 13, 1933 – August 16, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1957 until 1970, most notably for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Roseboro was a four-time All-Star player and won two Gold Glove Awards for his defensive skills. He was the Dodgers' starting catcher in four World Series with the Dodgers winning three of those.[2] He is considered one of the best defensive catchers of the 1960s. Roseboro was known for his role in one of the most violent incidents in baseball history when Juan Marichal struck him in the head with a bat during a game in 1965. In an fourteen-year major league career, Roseboro played in 1,585 games, accumulating 1,206 hits in 4,847 at bats for a .249 career batting average along with 104 home runs, 548 runs batted in and an on-base percentage of .326. He had a .989 career fielding percentage as a catcher. Roseboro caught 112 shutouts during his career, ranking him 19th all-time among major league catchers. He was the catcher for two of Sandy Koufax's four no-hitters and caught more than 100 games in 11 of his 14 major league seasons. Baseball historian Bill James ranked Roseboro 27th all-time among major league catchers.

Michael Warren Scott (born April 26, 1955) is an American former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets and the Houston Astros. He won the National League Cy Young Award 1986. Scott is part of a select group of pitchers that have thrown a no-hitter and struck out 300 batters in the same season. Scott enjoyed his most successful season in 1986, when he posted an 18-10 record with a 2.22 earned run average, striking out a league-leading 306 batters. On September 25 of that season, he threw a 2-0 no-hitter against the San Francisco Giants at the Astrodome to clinch the National League West division title for the Astros. This game was voted one of the top five games played in the Astrodome after the Astros moved to Enron Field following the 1999 season. He led a strong starting rotation that included Bob Knepper, Nolan Ryan, and Jim Deshaies. Scott's outstanding form continued into the postseason, when Houston faced the Eastern Division champion New York Mets in the 1986 National League Championship Series. The Astros lost the series, 4 games to 2, but those two Astros victories were courtesy of Scott's overwhelming starting pitching performances in Games 1 and 4. However, there were rumors that Scott's dominating performance was the result of doctoring the baseball or cutting it or "scuffing" it. The New York Mets aggressively voiced their suspicions to the media during the series. So dominating was Scott against the Mets' batting order in those two games that Game 6 was considered something of a "must win" for the Mets' pennant hopes; a Game 6 loss to the Astros would have meant that New York would again face an apparently unbeatable Mike Scott in a deciding Game 7 in the Astrodome. The Mets won that Game 6 in sixteen innings, averting another Scott start, to win the league pennant. In recognition of his regular season performance, Scott was awarded the 1986 National League Cy Young Award as the league's best pitcher. Scott was also voted the NL 1986 NLCS MVP, the first time in NLCS history that a member of the losing team was so honored (a year later, the San Francisco Giants' Jeffrey Leonard would become the second consecutive NLCS MVP of the losing team). In 1987, Scott was the National League starter in the All-Star Game, and threw two scoreless innings. He was also the opening day starter for the Astros. He went 16-13 with a 3.23 earned run average, eight complete games and three shutouts in 247.2 innings while finishing second in the National League with 233 strikeouts. In 1988, Scott once more was named the Astros' opening day starter. On June 12, he was denied a second no-hitter when the Atlanta Braves' Ken Oberkfell singled to right with two outs in the ninth inning. He had a 14-8 record with a 2.92 earned run average, eight compete games and five shutouts in 218.2 innings while having 190 strikeouts. In 1989, Scott won 20 games (while losing 10) and finished second in NL Cy Young Award voting, behind

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

Winner of four home run titles, Lewis Robert "Hack" Wilson packed a wallop in his 12-year career. Known for his compact stature, Wilson was described by sportswriter Thomas Holmes thusly; "There is Wilson, a giant of a little man, one who looks as though he might have been battered down to his five-foot six-inches by a ponderous blacksmith's hammer." Holmes also opined that "[Wilson's] feet are in proportion to his height - they are the feet of a ballet dancer or bantamweight fighter." Wilson's 1930 season still inspires awe: a record 191 RBI, 56 home runs and a .356 batting average. Elected 1979.

Eugene Walter Baker (June 15, 1925 – December 1, 1999) was an American Major League Baseball infielder who played for the Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates during eight seasons between 1953 and 1961, and was selected for the National League team in the 1955 All-Star Game.. After his release from the Navy, he played for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro American League as their regular shortstop during 1948 and 1949. In 1950, Baker joined the Cubs' organization, playing briefly at Springfield and Des Moines before joining the Los Angeles Angels, of the Triple-A and Open Classification Pacific Coast League, where he impressed all with his fielding and baserunning. Bobby Bragan, manager of the Angels’ chief rivals, the Hollywood Stars, said Baker was "as good a shortstop as I’ve ever seen – and that includes Pee Wee Reese." The Cubs purchased Gene Baker's contract and he made his major league debut September 20, 1953. A few days after acquiring Baker, the Cubs acquired another shortstop, future Hall of Famer Ernie Banks, and moved Baker to second base, perhaps believing he would be able to adapt to a different position more easily than the younger Banks. He primarily played second base for the Cubs and Pirates during eight seasons. He was a reserve infielder for the 1960 World Series champion Pirates and made three pinch-hit appearances during the Series.

Rex Edward Barney (December 19, 1924 – August 12, 1997) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943 and from 1946 through 1950. As a teenage phenom, Barney was signed by the Dodgers at the age of 18, in 1943. He pitched 45 innings that year. Enlisting in the Army in 1943, Barney eventually served in the Europe receiving 2 Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star Medal. Barney returned to the majors in 1946. He was one of the hardest throwers in the league but struggled with wildness early in his career. In 1948, however, he gained control of his fastball and had his greatest season; he won 15 games and finished second in the National League with 138 strikeouts. The highlight was hurling a no-hitter against the New York Giants on September 9. He had to sit through a one-hour rain delay and showers in the 7th, 8th, and 9th innings to finish the game. The next season, Barney pitched semi-effectively while suffering lingering effects from a leg injury suffered while sliding into second base. Barney appeared in 3 games in the 1947 World Series – starting and losing the fifth game – against the New York Yankees. He got knocked out early in his 1949 World Series start, also against the Yankees, after just 22/3 innings. In 1950, he walked 48 batters in just 33 innings and never played in the majors again. He ended his career with a 35–31 record and a 4.31 earned run average.

Government Postcard BARRY, JACK NM 7

John Joseph "Jack" Barry (April 26, 1887 – April 23, 1961) was an American shortstop, second baseman, and manager in Major League Baseball, and later a college baseball coach. From 1908 through 1919, Barry played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1908–15) and Boston Red Sox (1915–19). Born in Meriden, Connecticut, Barry spent his nearly entire tenure in the big leagues on winning teams, first the Philadelphia Athletics and later the Boston Red Sox. Athletics manager Connie Mack signed Barry off the campus of the College of the Holy Cross to play shortstop on what would become his famous $100,000 infield. The unit, one of the most famous groups of teammates in baseball history, consisted of first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, and third baseman Frank Baker. The group was critical to the Athletics winning the American League pennant in 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914, and World Championships in 1910, 1911, and 1913. In 1915, the year after the Boston Braves swept the Athletics in the World Series, Red Sox owner Joe Lannin paid $8,000 for Barry's services, as Mack was dismantling the team. Upon joining the Red Sox, he hit just .262 but played reliable defense at shortstop, proving to be the last piece of the puzzle in what was to be another pennant-winning team. He played in the World Series in 1915 and 1916 for the Red Sox. Acknowledged as the team's on-field leader, he became a player-manager in 1917, leading the team to a 90-win season and a second-place finish to the Chicago White Sox. In the war year of 1917, manager Jack Barry chose to enlist and on October 18, 1917 Jack and four other Red Sox players, who had enlisted as yeomen in the naval reserve, were called to active duty and ordered to report for duty on November 3, 1917. He served all of 1918 in the military. After poor play in 1919, he decided to retire rather than be sold away in another fire sale following Harry Frazee's decision to sell his shortstop back to the Athletics. In an 11-season career, Barry posted a .243 batting average with 10 home runs and 429 RBI in 1223 games.

Fred Donald Bessent (March 13, 1931 – July 7, 1990) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched from 1955 to 1958 with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers. He was signed by the New York Yankees out of high school, and in his first professional season he pitched a no-hitter[1] while going 22–7 in Class D. The following season, he moved up to the Class B Norfolk Tars and went 11–2 with a 2.04 earned run average. Bessent then developed a spinal condition and was unable to pitch in 1952. He underwent surgery and was subsequently drafted by the Dodgers. From 1953 to 1955, Bessent pitched for the St. Paul Saints of the American Association. He was called up to the majors in July 1955 and immediately pitched well. That season, he went 8–1 with a 2.70 ERA, mostly coming out of the bullpen. He also pitched 31/3 scoreless innings in the 1955 World Series, and the Dodgers won their first championship. Bessent pitched just as well in 1956, going 4–3 with nine saves and a 2.50 ERA. The Dodgers won another National League pennant but lost the World Series to the New York Yankees, despite Bessent's win in Game 2. He pitched the final seven innings of a 13–8 slugfest after both teams' starting pitchers were knocked out in the second inning. In 1957, he dropped off sharply, posting a 5.73 ERA in 44 innings. He began to develop arm problems shortly afterwards and played his final major league game in September 1958. He retired in 1962, after several unsuccessful seasons in the minors. He is survived by 3 daughters, who remain in Jacksonville. Bessent returned to Jacksonville and became a sales representative. He died of alcohol poisoning in 1990.

Ewell Blackwell (October 23, 1922 – October 29, 1996) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Whip" for his sidearm, snap-delivery, Blackwell played for the Cincinnati Reds for most of his career (1942; 1946–52). He also played with the New York Yankees (1952–53) and finished his career with the Kansas City Athletics (1955). Blackwell is considered to have been one of the greatest pitchers of his era, and starred in a six-year streak in the All-Star Game from 1946 through 1951. He was the winning pitcher of the 1950 All-Star Game, getting Joe DiMaggio to ground into a game-ending double play in the 14th inning. On June 18, 1947, Blackwell pitched a 6–0 no-hitter against the Boston Braves. In his next start, June 22, against the Brooklyn Dodgers, he took a no-hitter into the ninth inning, trying to tie the achievement of his veteran Reds teammate Johnny Vander Meer from nine years earlier, of throwing consecutive no-hitters. However, the no-hit attempt was broken up by Eddie Stanky. The Reds won the game 4–0. In a 10-season career, Blackwell posted an 82–78 record with 839 strikeouts and a 3.30 ERA in 1,321 innings pitched. In 1960, he was just the eighth player ever to be inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. During a 2007 New York Mets broadcast, Blackwell was referred to as the best right-handed pitcher ever by Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner. Both Kiner and Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella called Blackwell the toughest pitcher they ever faced. Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully also reported that batters were genuinely afraid to face him.

"That old paw served me pretty well in its time," said Mordecai Brown. "it gave me a firmer grip on the ball, so I could spin it over the hump, it gave me a greater dip." After his pitching hand was mangled in a farm-machine accident as a youth, Brown became known as "Three-Finger." Despite the injury, Brown was one of the National League's best pitchers of the early 20th century, winning 239 games - nearly 65 percent of his starts. He posted six 20-win seasons and once beat Christy Mathewson in nine straight matchups. Brown's Chicago Cubs won four NL pennants and two World Series championships. Elected 1949.

George Daniel Crowe (March 22, 1921 – January 18, 2011) was an American professional baseball player who appeared in 702 games in the major leagues as a first baseman and pinch hitter between 1952 and 1961. He also played professional basketball. Born in Whiteland, Indiana, Crowe graduated from Franklin High School, Franklin, Indiana, and Indiana Central College (now the University of Indianapolis) as a member of the Class of 1943. He was the first Indiana "Mr. Basketball" and served in the United States Army during World War II. Crowe batted and threw left-handed, stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 210 pounds (95 kg). He played for the Boston and Milwaukee Braves (1952–1953; 1955), Cincinnati Redlegs (1956–1958) and St. Louis Cardinals (1959–1961), all of the National League. He hit 31 home runs for Cincinnati in 1957, filling in most of the season for the injured Ted Kluszewski. He was selected to the 1958 NL All-Star squad but did not play in the July 8 midsummer classic, won by the rival American League 4–3 at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. The previous season, Cincinnati fans had been involved in a ballot stuffing campaign to put all of the team's regulars in the Senior Circuit's starting lineup for the 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Frank Robinson, Gus Bell and Wally Post were voted into the lineup, but Crowe was beaten out in the tally by future Cardinal teammate Stan Musial.

Robert Irving Elliott (November 26, 1916 – May 4, 1966) was an American third baseman and right fielder in Major League Baseball who played most of his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Braves. He also briefly managed and coached in the Majors. Elliott contributed some of the happiest memories to the Braves' final Boston years, winning the 1947 National League Most Valuable Player Award and earning the nickname "Mr. Team." The following season, his power hitting helped lift Boston to its second National League pennant of the 20th century, the team's first in 34 years, and last before relocating to Milwaukee. He was the second Major League third baseman to have five seasons of 100 runs batted in, joining Pie Traynor, and retired with the highest career slugging percentage (.440) of any NL third baseman. He also led the National League in assists three times and in putouts and double plays twice each, and ended his career among the NL leaders in games (8th, 1262), assists (7th, 2547), total chances (10th, 4113) and double plays (4th, 231) at third base.

Philip Joseph Gallivan (May 29, 1907 – November 24, 1969) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. Born in Seattle, Washington, he pitched for the 1931 Brooklyn Robins and then for the Chicago White Sox in 1932 and 1934. He died in St. Paul, Minnesota on November 24, 1969.

Gustave Getz (August 3, 1889 – May 28, 1969) was an American professional baseball third baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1909 through 1918 for the Boston Doves, Brooklyn Robins, Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, and Pittsburgh Pirates. He had one at-bat in the 1916 World Series for Brooklyn.

Joseph Walton Haynes (September 21, 1917 – January 6, 1967) was an American professional baseball player, coach and front office executive. A right-handed pitcher, he logged 14 seasons in Major League Baseball as a member of the Washington Senators (1939–40; 1949–52) and Chicago White Sox (1941–48). He married Thelma Mae Robertson Griffith, niece and adopted daughter of Washington owner Clark Griffith, in October 1941, ten months after he had been traded to Chicago by his future father-in-law. Born in Lincolnton, Georgia, Haynes' pro career began in 1937. He stood 6 feet 2 inches (188 cm) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg). In 379 games pitched, including 147 games started, Haynes compiled a 76–82 win-loss record, 53 complete games, five shutouts, 159 games finished and 21 saves in 1,581 innings pitched. He allowed 1,672 hits, 823 runs, 704 earned runs, 95 home runs and 620 walks, with 475 strikeouts, 26 hit batsmen, 35 wild pitches, 6,890 batters faced, four balks and a 4.01 ERA. Of Haynes' 379 appearances, 218 came with the White Sox, where he won 55 of 98 decisions (.561) and posted a solid (3.14) ERA. He was named to the 1948 American League All-Star team (although he did not appear in the game) and led the American League in games pitched (40) and games finished (35) in 1942 and in earned run average (2.42) in 1947. He was reacquired by Washington after the 1948 season, but was ineffective, going only 10–21 (5.42) in 112 games in his second stint with the Senators.

Jack Eugene Jensen (March 9, 1927 – July 14, 1982) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for three American League (AL) teams from 1950 to 1961, most notably the Boston Red Sox. He was named the AL's Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1958 after hitting 35 home runs and leading the league with 122 runs batted in (RBIs); he also led the league in RBIs two other years, and in triples and stolen bases once each. Respected for his throwing arm, he won a Gold Glove Award and led the AL in assists and double plays twice each. He retired in his early thirties as major-league baseball expanded westward, due to an intense fear of flying. After being a two-sport star in college, Jensen was the first man to play in the Rose Bowl, the World Series, and the MLB All-Star Game.

Willie Edward Jones (August 16, 1925 – October 18, 1983), nicknamed "Puddin' Head", was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1947–1959), Cleveland Indians (1959) and Cincinnati Reds (1959–1961). He batted and threw right-handed. In a 15-season career, Jones was a .258 hitter with 190 home runs and 812 RBI in 1691 games played. Born in Dillon, South Carolina, Jones grew up in and listed Laurel Hill, North Carolina, as his home. A World War II veteran of the United States Navy, Jones started his major league career with the Phillies in 1947. By 1949, he became the team's starting third baseman, and held that position until 1959. Jones was the top fielding third baseman in the National League during the 1950s. He led the league in fielding percentage five times, in putouts for seven years (also tying a record), and twice in assists and double plays. Jones' most productive season came as a member of the fabulous 1950 "Whiz Kids" National League champion team, when he posted career-highs in home runs (25), RBI (88), runs (100), hits (163), and led the league in games played (157). In 1951 he hit 22 homers with 81 RBI and a career-high .285 batting average. He was selected for the All-Star Game in both seasons. In 1959, Jones was part of successive trades between the Phillies, Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds. He finished his career with Cincinnati in 1961.

Colorful and flamboyant, Bill Klem brought dignity and respect to his profession. Know as "The Old Arbitrator," he umpired almost exclusively behind the plate his first 16 years because of his superior ability to call balls and strikes. Klem was among the first to use arm signals to coincide with his calls. Proof of is skill and universal respect were his 18 World Series assignments. Klem umpired from 1905 to 1941 and the served as chief of National League umpires. When honored at the Polo Grounds on September 2, 1949, he declared: "Baseball to me is not a game; it is a religion." Elected 1953.

Stanley Edward Lopata (September 12, 1925 – June 15, 2013) was an American professional baseball player. A catcher, Lopata played in Major League Baseball for 13 seasons in the National League with the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Braves. In 853 career games, Lopata recorded a batting average of .254 and accumulated 661 hits, 116 home runs, and 379 runs batted in (RBI). A two-time all-star, he was the first National League catcher to wear glasses. On September 13, 1948, Lopata finally received his call to the majors along with four of his teammates (Lou Possehl, Jocko Thompson, Jim Konstanty, and Willie "Puddin' Head" Jones) from the AAA Toronto Maple Leafs.[10] He got his first start in the second game of a doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 19, playing catcher and batting 8th in the order. He went 0 for 4 in the game. On the next day, Lopata was called upon again to start the second game of a doubleheader, this time getting his first hit, a double. The rookie impressed manager Eddie Sawyer so much in spring training that he initially won the role of starting catcher from six-year veteran Andy Seminick, citing that he was "the most improved player on the club."[12] He was said to be a product of club President Bob Carpenter's "youth movement."[13] The Phillies had the youngest team in the majors that year, calling themselves the "Fighting Phillies of '49,"[14] determined to improve upon their dreadful record of 66–88 from the 1948 season.[2] Despite having the starting job, Lopata split time with Seminick, eventually playing in less games than Seminick and also providing much less offensive support. Despite putting up relatively average numbers of a .271 batting average, 8 home runs, and 27 RBI in 83 games, the 23-year-old's first full season was generally regarded as a success. One reporter recalled that Lopata "hit one of the longest homers Sunday at Shibe Park since the days of (Jimmie) Foxx. Before the start of the 1950 season, Lopata's status as starter or backup was not established until mid-March as Seminick was holding out for a sufficient contract. He was reportedly the "last of the club's holdouts", and "appeared eager to sign after (Bob) Carpenter informed him his substitute, Stan Lopata" had hit three towering home runs over the deep left field wall at the Phillies' training park in Clearwater, Florida. Seminick got the starting role, with Lopata coming in as the backup. The season saw less playing time for Stan, hitting just .209 with 1 home run and 11 RBI in 58 games. The Phillies, dubbed the Whiz Kids due to their youthful roster age, won the National League pennant, before being swept in four straight games in the 1950 World Series by the New York Yankees. Lopata was used very sparingly in the World Series, but earned the dubious honor of recording the final out of the series, striking out to a cutter from Yankees pitcher Allie Reynolds. 1951 was full of downs for Lopata. On April 27, he was optio

Wallace Moses (October 8, 1910 – October 10, 1990) was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics (1935–41; 1949–51), Chicago White Sox (1942–46), and Boston Red Sox (1946–48). Moses started his professional career with Galveston of the Texas League, where he batted .316 in 1934.[1] He debuted with the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1935 season. He batted over .300 each of his seven years with them, with a career-best .345 in his sophomore year. Moses had by far his most productive season in 1937, when he hit career-highs in home runs (25), RBI (86), runs (113), hits (208) and doubles (48), batting .320 with 13 triples. In 1939, he missed a World Series opportunity when his trade to the Detroit Tigers for Benny McCoy was nullified by Baseball Commissioner K.M. Landis. The verdict made several Tigers free agents. Through years of last place finishes with Philadelphia, Moses had little chance to display his speed on the basepaths. But in 1943, with the Chicago White Sox, he posted a career-high 56 stolen bases and co-led the American League in triples (12). A strong-armed right fielder, he led the AL in putouts (329) in 1945. In the 1946 World Series with the Boston Red Sox, Moses hit .417 (5-for-12) and tied a WS record with four hits in a game. He finished his career with the Athletics in 1951. His first 7 years with the A's (1935-1941) were the most productive in his career. Moses surpassed .300 in every season. He posted 61 home runs, 354 rbi, and hit .317 (1135-for-3580). After being traded away after the 1941 season, he never hit .300 again and his productivity declined, posting 28 home runs, 325 rbi, and batting .266 (1003-for-3776) over the next 10 seasons with the White Sox and Red Sox and the A's again. The closest he came to the .300 plateau is when he hit .295 with the White Sox in 1945. His second tenure with the A's (1949-1951) was not even close to the numbers he put up with them at the beginning of his career. In a 17-season career, Moses hit .291 with 89 home runs and 679 RBI in 2012 games played. He added 1,124 runs, 2,138 hits, 435 doubles, 110 triples and 174 stolen bases. His career fielding percentage was .973. A patient hitter with a good eye, Moses collected a 80 walk-to-strikeout ratio (821-to-457). He also made the American League All-Star team in 1937 and 1945.

Donald Newcombe (June 14, 1926 – February 19, 2019), nicknamed "Newk", was an American professional baseball pitcher in Negro league and Major League Baseball who played for the Newark Eagles (1944–45), Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers (1949–1951 and 1954–58), Cincinnati Reds (1958–1960), and Cleveland Indians (1960). Newcombe was the first pitcher to win the Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player, and Cy Young Awards during his career. This distinction would not be achieved again until 2011, when Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander, who was Rookie of the Year in 2006, won the Cy Young and MVP awards. In 1949, he became the first black pitcher to start a World Series game. In 1951, Newcombe was the first black pitcher to win twenty games in one season.[1] In 1956, the inaugural year of the Cy Young Award, he became the first pitcher to win the National League MVP and the Cy Young in the same season. Newcombe was an excellent hitting pitcher who compiled a career batting average of .271 with 15 home runs and was used as a pinch hitter, a rarity for pitchers.

Charles Flint Rhem (January 24, 1901 – July 30, 1969), born in Rhems, Georgetown County, South Carolina, was a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1924–28, 1930–32, 1934 and 1936), Philadelphia Phillies (1932–33) and Boston Braves (1934–35). Before his professional career, Rhem played for the Clemson Tigers baseball team (1922–24).[1] He helped the Cardinals win the 1926 World Series, 1931 World Series, and 1934 World Series and 1928 and 1930 National League pennants. He finished 8th in voting for the 1926 National League MVP for having a 20–7 Win–loss record, 34 Games, 34 Games Started, 20 Complete Games, 1 Shutout, 258 Innings Pitched, 241 Hits Allowed, 121 Runs Allowed, 92 Earned Runs Allowed, 12 Home Runs Allowed, 75 Walks Allowed, 72 Strikeouts, 1 Hit Batsmen, 5 Wild Pitches, 1,068 Batters Faced, 1 Balk and a 3.21 ERA. In 12 seasons he had a 105–97 Win–Loss record, 294 Games, 229 Games Started, 91 Complete Games, 8 Shutouts, 41 Games Finished, 10 Saves, 1,725 ? Innings Pitched, 1,958 Hits Allowed, 989 Runs Allowed, 805 Earned Runs Allowed, 113 Home Runs Allowed, 529 Walks Allowed, 534 Strikeouts, 20 Hit Batsmen, 33 Wild Pitches, 7,516 Batters Faced, 4 Balks and a 4.20 ERA.

Branch Rickey spent a half a century as a baseball visionary. With the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1920s and 1930s, Rickey invented the modern farm system, promoting a new way of training and developing players. After joining the Brooklyn Dodgers, Rickey became the first executive to challenge baseball's color line when he signed Jackie Robinson, who in 1947 would become the major leagues' first African American player in the 20th century. When Robinson asked Rickey if he was looking for a Negro who was afraid to fight back, Rickey replied, "No, I'm looking for a ballplayer with the guts enough not to." Elected 1967.

Branch Rickey spent a half a century as a baseball visionary. With the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1920s and 1930s, Rickey invented the modern farm system, promoting a new way of training and developing players. After joining the Brooklyn Dodgers, Rickey became the first executive to challenge baseball's color line when he signed Jackie Robinson, who in 1947 would become the major leagues' first African American player in the 20th century. When Robinson asked Rickey if he was looking for a Negro who was afraid to fight back, Rickey replied, "No, I'm looking for a ballplayer with the guts enough not to." Elected 1967.

Albert Leonard Rosen (February 29, 1924 – March 13, 2015), nicknamed "Flip" and "The Hebrew Hammer", was an American baseball third baseman and right-handed slugger in Major League Baseball for ten seasons in the 1940s and 1950s. After serving for four years in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Rosen played his entire ten-year career (1947–1956) with the Cleveland Indians in the American League (AL). A stand-out on both offense and defense, he drove in 100 or more runs five consecutive years, was a four-time All-Star, twice led the league in home runs and twice in runs batted in (RBIs), and was an AL Most Valuable Player. Rosen was a .285 career hitter, with 192 home runs and 717 RBIs in 1,044 games. He was selected for the All-Star Game from 1952 to 1955. Rosen appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1955. Following two decades as a stockbroker upon retirement from baseball, Rosen returned to the game as a top front office executive in the late 1970s, serving the New York Yankees, Houston Astros, and San Francisco Giants variously as president, CEO, and general manager. Regarded as a GM who still thought like a player, he became the only former MVP to also earn baseball's Executive of the Year award.

Lynwood Thomas "Schoolboy" Rowe (January 11, 1910 – January 8, 1961) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, primarily for the Detroit Tigers (1932–42) and Philadelphia Phillies (1943, 1946–49). He was a three-time All-Star (1935, 1936 & 1947), and a member of three Tigers' World Series teams (1934, 1935 & 1940). Rowe also contributed to the Tigers' success in 1934 and 1935 with his hitting. In 1934, he hit for a .303 batting average and had eight doubles, two home runs, and 22 RBIs in 109 at bats. In 1935, he raised his average to .312 with three home runs and 28 RBIs in 109 at bats. In his fifteen seasons in the big leagues, Rowe hit eighteen home runs (14th best in major league history for a pitcher) and 153 RBIs. His career batting average was .263 (239-for-909).

Government Postcard SAIN, JOHNNY MINT 9

John Franklin Sain (September 25, 1917 – November 7, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who was best known for teaming with left-hander Warren Spahn on the Boston Braves teams from 1946 to 1951. He was the runner-up for the National League's Most Valuable Player Award in the Braves' pennant-winning season of 1948, after leading the National League in wins, complete games and innings pitched. He later became further well known as one of the top pitching coaches in the majors. Born in Havana, Arkansas, Sain pitched for 11 years, winning 139 games and losing 116 in his career and compiled an earned run average of 3.49. His best years were those immediately after World War II, when he won 100 games for the Boston Braves, before being traded to the New York Yankees during the 1951 season for Lew Burdette and cash. Sain also had the distinction of being the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth in a game and the first in the Major League to throw a pitch against Jackie Robinson. In 1948, Sain won 24 games against 15 losses and finished second in the voting for the Most Valuable Player Award behind the St. Louis Cardinals' Stan Musial, who had won two legs of the Triple Crown. Sain and teammate Spahn achieved joint immortality that year when their feats were the subject of sports editor Gerald V. Hern's poem in the Boston Post which was eventually shortened to the epigram "Spahn and Sain; then pray for rain." The poem was inspired by the performance of Sain and Spahn during the Braves' 1948 pennant drive. The team swept a Labor Day doubleheader, with Spahn throwing a complete game 14-inning win in the opener, and Sain pitching a shutout in the second game. Following two off days, it did rain. Spahn won the next day, and Sain won the day after that. Three days later, Spahn won again. Sain won the next day. After one more off day, the two pitchers were brought back, and won another doubleheader. The two pitchers had gone 8–0 in twelve days' time. That year, the Boston Braves won their second and last National League pennant of the post-1901 era, but fell in six games to the Cleveland Indians in the 1948 World Series. Sain won the first game of the Series, a 1–0 shutout at Braves Field that included a memorable play in which Boston catcher Phil Masi was called safe after an apparent pickoff at second base. Masi went on to score the game's only run. With the Yankees, Sain became a relief pitcher and enjoyed late-career success, leading the American League in saves with 22 in 1954. He finished his career in 1955 with the Kansas City Athletics. A very good hitting pitcher in his 11 year major league career, Sain posted a .245 batting average with 69 runs, 3 home runs and 101 RBI.

Government Postcard SAIN, JOHNNY MINT 9

John Franklin Sain (September 25, 1917 – November 7, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who was best known for teaming with left-hander Warren Spahn on the Boston Braves teams from 1946 to 1951. He was the runner-up for the National League's Most Valuable Player Award in the Braves' pennant-winning season of 1948, after leading the National League in wins, complete games and innings pitched. He later became further well known as one of the top pitching coaches in the majors. Born in Havana, Arkansas, Sain pitched for 11 years, winning 139 games and losing 116 in his career and compiled an earned run average of 3.49. His best years were those immediately after World War II, when he won 100 games for the Boston Braves, before being traded to the New York Yankees during the 1951 season for Lew Burdette and cash. Sain also had the distinction of being the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth in a game and the first in the Major League to throw a pitch against Jackie Robinson. In 1948, Sain won 24 games against 15 losses and finished second in the voting for the Most Valuable Player Award behind the St. Louis Cardinals' Stan Musial, who had won two legs of the Triple Crown. Sain and teammate Spahn achieved joint immortality that year when their feats were the subject of sports editor Gerald V. Hern's poem in the Boston Post which was eventually shortened to the epigram "Spahn and Sain; then pray for rain." The poem was inspired by the performance of Sain and Spahn during the Braves' 1948 pennant drive. The team swept a Labor Day doubleheader, with Spahn throwing a complete game 14-inning win in the opener, and Sain pitching a shutout in the second game. Following two off days, it did rain. Spahn won the next day, and Sain won the day after that. Three days later, Spahn won again. Sain won the next day. After one more off day, the two pitchers were brought back, and won another doubleheader. The two pitchers had gone 8–0 in twelve days' time. That year, the Boston Braves won their second and last National League pennant of the post-1901 era, but fell in six games to the Cleveland Indians in the 1948 World Series. Sain won the first game of the Series, a 1–0 shutout at Braves Field that included a memorable play in which Boston catcher Phil Masi was called safe after an apparent pickoff at second base. Masi went on to score the game's only run. With the Yankees, Sain became a relief pitcher and enjoyed late-career success, leading the American League in saves with 22 in 1954. He finished his career in 1955 with the Kansas City Athletics. A very good hitting pitcher in his 11 year major league career, Sain posted a .245 batting average with 69 runs, 3 home runs and 101 RBI.

Karl Benjamin Spooner (June 23, 1931 – April 10, 1984) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a left-handed pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers. After a meteoric professional baseball debut in 1954, his promising athletic career was cut short by an injury to his pitching arm. A native of Oriskany Falls, New York, at the age of 20, Spooner was signed to a contract by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1951 and was assigned to play in Minor league baseball. Spooner's early minor league career was promising, but erratic. Walks were frequently a problem, as Spooner averaged a walk per inning in his first two minor league seasons. However, he also had great speed, and showed flashes of brilliance. He made his way up the Dodgers' minor league system, compiling an unimpressive 27–36 record during his first three seasons. He had a breakout year in 1954 when he won 21 games with 262 strikeouts in 238 innings for the Fort Worth Cats of the Texas League. His successful performance earned him a promotion to the Brooklyn Dodgers with one week left in the 1954 season. Spooner made his major league debut with the Dodgers on September 22, 1954 at the age of 23. He allowed only 3 hits, all singles and, struck out 15 batters, setting a Major League Baseball record for most strikeouts by a pitcher in his major league debut. He broke the record of 13 strikeouts set by the New York Giants’ Cliff Melton on April 25, 1937.[4] J. R. Richard tied the record in his major league debut in 1971. Spooner also set another record for pitching debuts by recording six consecutive strikeouts, striking out the side in both the 7th and 8th innings. Pete Richert (1962) is the only other pitcher to strike out six consecutive batters in his Major League debut. Four days later, Spooner beat the Pittsburgh Pirates, 1-0, striking out 12 and surrendering 4 hits. Although he only started two games for the Dodgers, Spooner, compiled two complete game shutouts, throwing 18 innings, giving up 7 total hits and no runs. His 27 strikeouts in two successive games was a National League record (not just for rookies) and was second only to Bob Feller’s 28 on the major league list. However, during spring training prior to the 1955 season, Spooner entered a game without warming up properly. A severe arm injury was the result, after which Spooner was out of action until May 15, then made a comeback, appearing in 29 games with the Dodgers that year, but with only mild success. Initially used as a spot starter, Spooner was moved to the bullpen after two poor starts. He was added back into the rotation in late June, removed from it at the end of July, and was then given some spot starts in August and September, finishing the season at 8–6. He appeared in his final major league game on October 3, 1955 when he started game 6 of the 1955 World Series. Despite the winning record, Spooner was deemed only marginally effective. Prior to the injury

John Samuel Vander Meer (November 2, 1914 – October 6, 1997) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher, most notably for the Cincinnati Reds. Vander Meer is best known for being the only pitcher in Major League Baseball history to throw two consecutive no-hitters. After the impressive start to his major league career, he experienced problems controlling the accuracy of his pitching, and his later career was marked by inconsistent performances. Vander Meer made his major league debut with the Cincinnati Reds on April 22, 1937 at the age of 22.[1] He won 3 games and lost 4 before being sent back to the minor leagues with the Syracuse Chiefs for most of the season when the Reds recalled him in September. The following year on June 11, 1938, Vander Meer pitched a no hitter against the Boston Bees. Four days later against the Brooklyn Dodgers in what was the first night game ever held at Ebbets Field, he threw another no hitter, becoming the only player in major league history to throw two consecutive no-hitters, a historic record that has never been tied and almost certainly will never be beaten.

William Robert Wight (April 12, 1922 – May 17, 2007) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1946 through 1958 for the New York Yankees (1946–47), Chicago White Sox (1948–50), Boston Red Sox (1951–52), Detroit Tigers (1952–53), Cleveland Indians (1953, 1955), Baltimore Orioles (1955–57), Cincinnati Reds (1958) and St. Louis Cardinals (1958). Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 180 lb. Wight batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Rio Vista, California. In a twelve-season career, Wight posted a 77–99 record with 574 strikeouts and a 3.95 ERA in 347 appearances, including 198 starts, 66 complete games, 15 shutouts and eight saves in 1,563 innings of work. Wight scouted for the Houston Colt .45s/Astros and Atlanta Braves for 37 years after his active career ended — signing Baseball Hall of Fame second baseman Joe Morgan for Houston in 1962. He died in Mount Shasta, California, at the age of 85.

George "Sparky" Anderson was the first manager in history to win World Series championships in both the American and National leagues, doing so with the Detroit Tigers and the Cincinnati Reds. His career totals include 2,194 victories, two manager of the year awards, five league pennants and three World Series crowns. Elected 2000.

Manning the Chicago White Sox shortstop position throughout his 20-year career, Luke Appling proved to be a consistent fielder, solid batter and fan favorite. As a leadoff hitter, he was known for his ability to intentionally foul off pitches until hitting the pitch he wanted. Appling twice captured American League batting titles and finished with a .310 lifetime batting average. He collected 2,749 career hits. The seven-time All-Star also was selected as the Chicago White Sox's greatest player by Chicago fans in 1969. Elected 1964.

Among the most reliable leadoff batters in history, Richie Ashburn was a solid center fielder and consistent hitter who sprayed hits to all fields for the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit better than .300 during nine of 15 seasons, twice capturing the National League batting titles, while finishing second two other times. A .308 lifetime batter, Ashburn also led the NL in walks four times. A six-time All-Star selection "Whitey" transitioned to the broadcast booth following his career to become a popular Phillies announcer for more than three decades. Elected 1995.

Perhaps the subject of the most well known deadline deal in history, Jeff Bagwell proved to be the perfect fit in Houston. Traded by his hometown Red Sox before he ever appeared in a big league game, Bagwell won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1991 with his patient approach at the plate. By 1994, Bagwell added power in his resume, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 116 runs in that strike-shortened campaign to win the NL MVP Award. In 15 big league seasons, all spent with the Astros, the four time All-Star hit .297 with 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI and a .408 on base percentage. Elected 2017.

Harold Douglas Baines (March 15, 1959 - ) was first spotted as a spry 12-year-old by legendary Chicago White Sox owner/GM Bill Veeck and eventually played right field for 22 seasons in the Major Leagues with five different teams, including the White Sox. The Chicago White Sox selected with the Number 1 overall pick of the 1977 MLB June Amateur Draft and he made is Major League debut three years later in 1980. In 1982, Baines broke out as he amassed 165 hits, 25 home runs and 105 RBI beginning a streak as one of the most consistent hitters over the next 20 years. Harold played for the White Sox (1980-1989, 1996-1997, 2000-2001), the Texas Rangers (1989-1990), the Oakland Athletics (1990-1992), the Baltimore Orioles (1993-1995, 1997-1999, 2000) and the Cleveland Indians. Harold won one American League Silver Slugger Award, enjoyed six seasons batting above the .300-mark and earned six All-Star Game selections. Baines posted a .978 fielding percentage with 2,031 putouts, 69 assists, 17 double plays and 47 errors in 2,147 chances. Harold Baines finished his career with a .289 batting average, 2,866 hits including 488 doubles and 384 home runs, 1,299 runs and 1,628 RBI. The beloved White Sox right fielder returned to the Windy City to assist his former team in a coaching capacity. Harold won a World Series ring as a member of the 2005 Chicago White Sox coaching staff. Harold Baines was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

Heir to Honus Wagner's throne, Bancroft was the senior circuit's best shortstop in the late 1910's and 1920's. His play was, like his nickname, a thing of "Beauty". Bancroft is a very rare Hall of Fame autograph, especially on yellow plaque postcards because he was inducted in 1971 and died the following year.

Roy Campanella broke into baseball with the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro National League at age 16 and joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948. He was selected to eight All-Star Games and played in five World Series. Strong defensively, "Campy" also was a star with the bat, setting then-records for single-season (41) and career (242) home runs by a catcher. He won three National League Most Valuable Player Awards (1951. 1953 and 1955). His playing career was cut short by an automobile accident in 1958. Elected 1969.

"He's got everything - intelligence, strength, confidence, speed afoot and hand-eye coordination," manager Gene Mauch said of Rod Carew. "Many ballplayers are pleasant to manage, but managing Rod is a privilege." Carew was a pure hitter, who as pitcher Ken Holtzman described, "could move the bat around as if it were a magic wand." In 19 seasons with the Minnesota Twins and California Angels, Carew won seven American League batting titles, hitting .300-or-better for 15 consecutive seasons while compiling a .328 career average. He won the 1967 AL Rookie of the Year Award and the 1977 AL Most Valuable Player Award, and was selected to 18 All-Star Games. Elected 1991.

Richie Ashburn once likened Steve Carlton to an artist on the mound: "He painted a ballgame. Stroke, stroke, stroke, and when he go through it was a masterpiece." Carlton was an intense competitor with a hard biting slider that was complemented by a great fastball and curve. He ranks second on career lists for wins (329) and strikeouts (4,136) by a left-handed pitcher. In 1972, his first of four Cy Young Award-winning seasons, Carlton led the National League in wins (27), ERA (1.97), inning pitched (346.1) and strikeouts (310) - all for a last-place team that won only 59 games. Elected 1994.

Jocko Conlan became an umpire by accident when Red Ormsby was overcome by the heat while umpiring a 1935 game between the Chicago White Sox and the St. Louis Browns. Conlan, then an outfielder with the White Sox, was asked to fill in. The following year, Conlan launched a new career. A polka-dot tie, balloon chest protector and a quick grin became his trademarks. Conlan won the respect of players and managers alike with his hustle, accuracy and fairness. He umpired in five World Series. Elected 1974.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

Joe Cronin was the first to work his way from the playing field to the league presidency. A lifetime .301 hitter with 515 career doubles, Cronin was selected as an American League All-Star seven times. At age 26, he won the 1933 pennant as a player-manager with Washington Senators before being trade to the Boston Red Sox following the 1934 season, where his roles included player, manager, general manager, treasurer and vice president. He served two terms as AL president, overseeing the league's expansion from eight to twelve teams. Hall of Fames slugger Ted Williams praised his former manager stating, "Whatever I am, I owe to Joe." Elected 1956.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

As famed sportswriter Dan Daniels once wrote, "Bill Dickey isn't just a catcher, he's a ball club." A key performer for the New York Yankees on eight American League pennant-winners and seven World Series champions, the expert handler of pitchers with the deadly accurate throwing arm was also a top hitter, batting better than .300 in 10 of his first 11 full seasons. Know for his durability, he set an AL record by catching a 100 or more games 13 years in a row. Dickey finished his 17-year career with a .313 batting average. Elected 1954.

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.