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Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Nicknamed "Rowdy Richard", Dick Bartell was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball. One of the most ferocious competitors of his era, he won both admirers and critics of each stop during a career which saw him traded every few seasons, often under acrimonious circumstances. While hitting .300 over a full season five times, he led the National League in double plays four times and in putouts and assists three times each. From 1927 through 1946, Bartell played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927-30), Philadelphia Phillies (1931-34), New York Giants (1935-38, 1941), Chicago Cubs (1939), and Detroit Tigers (1940-41). After two years of military service in World War II, he played briefly in 1946 before retiring. At 5'9" and 160 pounds, he batted and threw right handed.

James Joseph Dykes was an American third and second baseman, manager and coach in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox from 1918 to 1939. He batted over .300 five times and led the American League in assists one at second base and twice at third base, ending his career sixth in AL history in games at third base (1,253), and seventh in putouts (1,361), assists (2,403), total chances (3,952) and double plays (199). When he retired he ranked eighth in AL history in games played (2,282), and ninth in at bats (8,046). He holds the Athletics franchise career double (365) and formerly held team marks for career games and at bats. He went on to become the winningest manager in White Sox history with 899 victories over 13 seasons, though his teams never finished above third place; he later became the first manager in history to win 1,000 games without capturing a league pennant.

William Anthony Hallahan (August 4, 1902 – July 8, 1981) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1920s and 1930s. Nicknamed "Wild Bill" because of his lack of control on the mound—he twice led the National League in bases on balls—Hallahan nevertheless was one of the pitching stars of the 1931 World Series and pitched his finest in postseason competition. He also was the starting pitcher for the National League in the first All-Star Game in 1933, losing a 4–2 decision to Lefty Gomez of the American League and surrendering a third-inning home run to Babe Ruth in the process.

Joseph "Flash" Gordon was a model of consistency throughout his 11-year major league career with the New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians. Gordon made his debut on April 18, 1938, and belted 25 home runs with a slugging percentage of .502 in his rookie season with the Yankees. He hit .322 in 1942 en route to the American League Most Valuable Player Award and was named to the AL All-Star team nine times. He hit 20-or-more home runs in seven seasons and drove in at least 100 runs four times. Gordon won four World Series titles with the Yankees and another with the Indians in 1948. Elected 2009.

Joseph Francis Page (October 28, 1917 – April 21, 1980), nicknamed Fireman and The Gay Reliever,[1] was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher. Page, who was left-handed, played with the New York Yankees from 1944 to 1950 and with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. Page was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. After spending time in the Yankees farm system, Page made his Major League Baseball debut on April 19, 1944 where he began his career as a starter. In his rookie season (starting 16 games, and relieving in three others), Page was voted to play in the All-Star Game and ended his season with over 100 innings pitched and a 4.56 ERA. The next season, Page suffered a shoulder injury, which led him to start only nine of the twenty games he pitched. That season, Page improved his ERA to 2.82, along with a 6–3 record. In 1946, Page split his time between closing and starting games, and he picked up three saves while posting a 3.57 ERA and a 9–8 record. In 1947, Page spent practically the whole season in the bullpen and only started twice. He was voted to play in the All-Star Game once again, because of his 2.48 ERA and a 14–8 record. He also led the American League with 17 saves this season. (Note that the save statistic was not an official baseball statistic until 1969, and had not even entered common usage until well after Page did this; this feat is something that is only retroactively appreciated. However, it was certainly appreciated at the time that Page played a greater than average role as the Yankees relief pitcher, at a time when there was no generally acknowledged "closing pitcher" role in baseball, and when starting pitchers were more often expected to finish complete games.) His fourteen relief wins in 1947 was an American League record until Luis Arroyo broke it in 1961. He was fourth in the league in American League MVP voting. In the seventh game of the 1947 World Series he earned the save by inducing Brooklyn Dodgers hitter Eddie Miksis to hit into a series-ending double play.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

With 2,678 career hits and 1,602 managerial wins, Fred Clarke excelled both on the field and in the dugout. In his first big league game, he went 5-for-5 on his way to fashioning a career .313 batting average, topping .300 in 11 seasons. In 1903, he led the league in doubles and slugging percentage while piloting the Pittsburgh Pirates to an appearance in the first modern World Series. A full-time player-manger in 15 of his 19 seasons at the helm, Clarke led his clubs to four first-place finishes. Elected 1945.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

Clark Griffith was a baseball pioneer his entire life. In 1901, "The Old Fox" became a player-manager for the Chicago White Sox in the new American League, leading them to a pennant. Griffith managed until 1920, when he became the Washington Senators principal owner after being a part owner since 1912. Innovative with limited finances, he won three pennants, hired entertainers for fans to enjoy and signed many Cuban players. "He was the greatest humanitarian who ever lived, and the greatest pillar of honesty ever had," said Bobo Newsom. "I never played for a better man. Elected 1946.

Napoleon "Nap" Lajoie combined graceful fielding with precision at the plate. Lajoie hit .300 or better in 17 of 21 seasons, topping .350 in nine campaigns and his high of .426 in 1901 remains an American League single-season record. That year, he won the AL Triple Crown and initiated the first court challenge to the reserve clause. By 1903, the Cleveland club became known as the "Naps" as a tribute to his star power. Billy Murphy, a St. Louis journalist, once wrote; "As long as baseball lives, the memory of Lajoie will last; and it ever will be a fresh memory of a ball player and a gentlemen. Elected 1937.

The greatest master of the legal spitball, "Big Ed" Walsh averaged 24 wins per season for the Chicago Whit Sox during a seven-year span from 1906 to 1912. The right-hander is best remembered for his amazing 1908 campaign, when he finished with a 40-15 record, 42 compete games, 11 shutouts, 269 strikeouts and a 20th-centruy record 464 innings pitched. During a six-year span, he average 375 innings per season. "Although I worked hard in the mines," he said during that run, "I work harder when I play ball." Elected 1946.

The greatest master of the legal spitball, "Big Ed" Walsh averaged 24 wins per season for the Chicago Whit Sox during a seven-year span from 1906 to 1912. The right-hander is best remembered for his amazing 1908 campaign, when he finished with a 40-15 record, 42 compete games, 11 shutouts, 269 strikeouts and a 20th-centruy record 464 innings pitched. During a six-year span, he average 375 innings per season. "Although I worked hard in the mines," he said during that run, "I work harder when I play ball." Elected 1946.

According to legend, New York Giants manager John McGraw received a flippant scouting report on Paul Waner: "That little punk don't even know how to put on a uniform," Upon seeing Waner play, McGraw fired the scout. "That little punt don't know how to put on a uniform, but he's removed three of my pitchers with line drives this week," McGraw roared. Waner began his baseball career as a pitcher, but his hitting prowess assured that "Big Poison" would play every day. During a 20-year career, Waner accumulated 3,152 hits, batted .333, won three National League batting championships and garnered the 1927 MVP Award. Elected 1952.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

With the nickname "sunny Jim" that reflected his upbeat demeanor, James Leroy Bottomley became the first major league Most Valuable Player to emerged from a team's own farm system, doing so for the St' Louis Cardinals in 1928. Bottomley played more than 1,809 games at first base, owning a lifetime battering average of .310 and posting nine seasons of .300 or better. In 1928 Bottomley led the National League in home runs and RBI, while guiding the Cardinals to the World Series. He authored one of the greatest single-game performances in history on Sept. 16, 1924, recording 12 RBI with two home runs, three singles and a double. Elected 1974.

Baseball's "Iron Horse," Lou Gehrig teamed with Babe Ruth to form the sport's most devastating tandem. A "Gibraltar in cleats," Gehrig posted 13 consecutive seasons with 100 runs scored and 100 RBI, averaging 141 runs and 149 RBI. The two-time American League Most Valuable Player set an AL mark with 185 RBI in 1931, hit a record 23 career grand slams and won the 1934 Triple Crown. His .361 batting average in seven World Series led the New York Yankees to six titles. A true gentleman and a tragic figure, Gehrig's consecutive games played streak ended at 2,130 when he was sidelined by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a disease that now bears his name. Elected 1939.

Undeniably the hardest throwing pitcher of his era, Walter Johnson was celebrated as much for his character as for his heroics on the mound. In a career that spanned from the rowdy Deadball Era through the Jazz Age. "The Big Train" always behaved in a noble and gentlemanly fashion, both on and off the field. "I throw as hard as I can when I think I have to throw as hard as I can," he reasoned when endlessly questioned about his fastball. Pitching his entire big league career with the Washington Senators in the nation's capital, Johnson finished with 417 wins, second only to Cy Young and 3,509 strikeouts, a record that stood for 56 years. Elected 1936.

Al Simmons grew up in a poor section of Milwaukee and was a classic case of local boy making good, playing parts of his first two professional seasons with the minor league Milwaukee Brewers. "Bucketfoot Al" was the consummate ballplayer - he could run, hit for power and average, and was an excellent fielder with a tremendous throwing arm. Paired with Jimmie Foxx on the Philadelphia Athletics, the two sluggers formed a dangerous 1-2 punch, leading the club to three straight appearances in the World Series (1929-1931). Simmons was a favorite of Connie Mack, who once said, "I wish I had nine players named Al Simmons." Elected 1953.

Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 – January 11, 1965) was an American professional baseball player. A first baseman, Pipp played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, and Cincinnati Reds between 1913 and 1928. After appearing in 12 games for the Tigers in 1913 and playing in the minor leagues in 1914, he was purchased by the Yankees before the 1915 season. They made him their starting first baseman. He and Home Run Baker led an improved Yankee lineup that led the league in home runs. He led the American League in home runs in 1916 and 1917. With Babe Ruth, Bob Meusel, Joe Dugan, and Waite Hoyt, the Yankees won three consecutive American League pennants from 1921 through 1923, and won the 1923 World Series. In 1925, he lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig, after which he finished his major league career with Cincinnati. Pipp is considered to be one of the best power hitters of the dead ball era. Pipp is now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrig's streak of 2,130 consecutive games. According to a popular legend, Pipp asked to sit due to a headache.

Playing in an era that favored slap hitters, Frank "Home Run" Baker manned the hot corner for Connie Mack's famed "100,000 Infield" in Philadelphia from 1911 through 1914. He led or tied for the league lead in home runs in each of those years, though he never hit more than 12 in a season. In the 1911 World Series, Baker's on successive days off Rube Marquard and Christy Mathewson earned him his nickname. The Maryland farm boy was a .307 lifetime hitter and batted .363 in six World Series. Elected 1955.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Mickey Cochrane batted .320 during his 13-year career and excelled behind the plate. He also possessed that special trait - a fierce competitive spirit - which gave him exceptional leadership qualities. "Black Mike" sparked the Philadelphia Athletics' pennant- winning teams in 1929, 1930 and 1931, hitting .331, .357 and .349, respectively. As player-manager for the Detroit Tigers from 1934 to 1937, he guided the team to the American League championship n 1934 and the World Series title in 1935. A beaning in 1937 ended his playing career. Elected 1947.

Signed in 1906 at age 18, Eddie Collins played 25 seasons in the major leagues - a 20th-century record for position players. In 10 seasons, he batter better than .340, helping earn membership in the exclusive 3,000 hit club. The fiery second baseman starred in the famous "100,000 infield" with the Philadelphia Athletics and also for the Chicago White Sox. The "choke-grip" batting style Collins used proved fruitful. An aggressive and confident second baseman, he also was an outstanding baserunner. Elected 1939.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

Known as "The Mechanical Man" for his remarkable consistency, Charlie Gehringer batted better than .300 in 13 seasons and collected more than 200 hits seven times. As New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez put it, "He's in a rut. He goes 2 for 5 on Opening Day and stays that way all season." An agile second baseman with quick hands, Gehringer led the league in assists and fielding percentage seven times each. Regarding his quiet reputation, the six-time All-Star said, "You can't talk your way into a batting championship." A cornerstone of three pennant-winning Tigers teams, he won the 1937 Most Valuable Player Award by batting .371. Elected 1949.

Rogers Hornsby hit for average and power, winning two Triple Crowns and seven batting titles during his 23-year major league career. His .424 average in 1924 remains the highest in the National League since 1901. Intense and demanding, Hornsby often wore out his welcome with clubs, despite two pennants a player-manager. At the start of 1935, Hornsby was one of only three players - long with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig - with 300 career home runs. His lifetime batting average of .358 remains the second-highest of all time.

Connie Mack won five World Series titles, a record nine American League pennants, and 3,731 games, nearly 1,00o more than any other manager in history. Still, "The Tall Tactician," is best remembered as a dignified leader who donned a business suit to dispense wisdom to a generation of players. "Your born with two strikes against you, so don't take a third one on your own," Mack was fond of stating to his clubs. Though his entrance to baseball came by playing catcher for 11 seasons, in 1901 Mack assumed control of the Philadelphia Athletics, the team he would lead for the next 50 years. Elected 1937.

Though slight in stature, Charles "Kid" Nichols was a giant among pitchers. In a 15-year career, Nichols - known for his velocity, curve and control - dominated late-19th century hitters, winning 361 games. During one stretch, he won at least 26 games for nine consecutive seasons. Nichols completed 532 of the 562 games he started. "You stayed in there and worked in those days," Nichols said. "My objective was to have the batter hit at the first one, and the second one and the third one. By that time, barring fouls, I figure he is either out or had made a hit." Elected 1949.

Melvin Thomas "Mel" Ott was a New York Giants hero for 22 seasons, during which he emerged as one of the game's premier sluggers. As a 17-year old "Boy Wonder" in 1926, Ott's size belied his power. Using an unorthodox batting style in which he lifted his right foot prior to impact, he smashed 511 home runs, then a National League record. He hit 30-or-more homers in a season eight times and led or shared the league lead on six occasions. "Master Melvin" earned 11 consecutive All-Star selections and batted .304 lifetime with 488 doubles NS 1,860 RBI. Elected 1951.

A symbol of durability and toughness, diminutive Ray Schalk was a defensive standout and an innovator at his position. Schalk is credited as one of the first catchers to back up plays at first and third base, and continuously caught 100-or-more games per season. A skilled receiver, he caught the 1920 Chicago White Sox staff, which featured four 20-game winners. He also was the first backstop to catch four no-hitters. Schalk retired after 18 seasons as owner of a slew of defensive records. He went on to manage, coach and scout for numerous professional and amateur baseball teams. Elected 1955.

The most celebrated defensive outfielder of the Dead Ball Era, Tris Speaker played a shallow center field, amassing a record 449 assists and mastering the unassisted double play. John Lardner wrote that Speaker was "as free and easy in the broad spaces of an outfield as a wild horse on a prairie." A terrific hitter with a .345 lifetime average, Speaker set the career record of 792 doubles and finished with 3,514 hits. A successful player-manager, he led the 1920 Cleveland Indians to the World Series championship. Elected 1937.

Clarence Arthur "Dazzy" Vance toiled in the minor leagues for a decade and didn't win a game in the majors until he was 31 years old. The most dominant pitcher of the 1920s, Vance used his blazing fastball to lead the National League in strikeouts for seven consecutive seasons. Teammate Johnny Frederick said that Vance "could throw a crème puff through a battleship." His 1924 season=, for which he won the MVP Award, featured the pitching Triple Crown; he led the league with a 28-6 record, 2.16 ERA and 262 strikeouts. Elected 1955.

Bobby Wallace began his career as a pitcher before moving to shortstop, where he starred for the St. Louis Browns for 15 seasons. A steady hitter, Wallace was best known for his defensed, leading the American League in fielding percentage two times and setting a record for most chances in one game (17). Credited with developing the "scoop and throw" method for getting throws to first base faster, he followed his playing career with stints as manager, coach, umpire and scout. "I loved every minute of it," Wallace said of his 60-year baseball career. Elected 1953.

Bobby Wallace began his career as a pitcher before moving to shortstop, where he starred for the St. Louis Browns for 15 seasons. A steady hitter, Wallace was best known for his defensed, leading the American League in fielding percentage two times and setting a record for most chances in one game (17). Credited with developing the "scoop and throw" method for getting throws to first base faster, he followed his playing career with stints as manager, coach, umpire and scout. "I loved every minute of it," Wallace said of his 60-year baseball career. Elected 1953.

"He was just as fast between his ears as he was with his feet." said sportswriter Joe Williams. "That's what made him harder to stop than a run in a silk stocking." Max Carey hustled on the bases, totaling 738 career steals, leading the National League 10 times during his 20-year career. Defensively, Carey led the league in putouts nine times and recorded 339 outfield assists. He batter better than .300 six times, amassing 2,665 career hits. In 1925, Carey hit .343 during the regular season and .458 in the World Series. Elected 1961.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

Joe Cronin was the first to work his way from the playing field to the league presidency. A lifetime .301 hitter with 515 career doubles, Cronin was selected as an American League All-Star seven times. At age 26, he won the 1933 pennant as a player-manager with Washington Senators before being trade to the Boston Red Sox following the 1934 season, where his roles included player, manager, general manager, treasurer and vice president. He served two terms as AL president, overseeing the league's expansion from eight to twelve teams. Hall of Fames slugger Ted Williams praised his former manager stating, "Whatever I am, I owe to Joe." Elected 1956.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

As famed sportswriter Dan Daniels once wrote, "Bill Dickey isn't just a catcher, he's a ball club." A key performer for the New York Yankees on eight American League pennant-winners and seven World Series champions, the expert handler of pitchers with the deadly accurate throwing arm was also a top hitter, batting better than .300 in 10 of his first 11 full seasons. Know for his durability, he set an AL record by catching a 100 or more games 13 years in a row. Dickey finished his 17-year career with a .313 batting average. Elected 1954.

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.

When Bob Feller said of his pitching; "I just reared back and let them go," he accurately described his blazing fastball. "Rapid Robert" set the standard for generations of future fireballers. During his 18-year career - spent entirely with the Cleveland Indians - Feller amassed 266 victories, leading the league in wins six times and strikeouts seven. After enlisting in the Navy in 1941, he missed nearly four full seasons to serve his country. As a Navy gun captain, Feller earned five campaign ribbons studded with eight battle stars. Feller authored three no-hitters and 12 one-hitter, winning 20 or more games six times. Elected 1962.

Like the original Roy Hobbs, Elmer Flick reported to the Philadelphia Phillies in the spring of 1898 with a bat he had turned on a lathe himself. Described by sportswriter Francis Richter as "one of the most promising youngsters the Phillies had ever had." Flick replaced injured Hall of Famer Sam Thompson in the outfield and remained in the majors for the next 13 seasons. In four full years with the Phillies, Flick hit .338. In nine seasons with the Cleveland Naps, the speedster let the American League in stolen bases twice, triples three times and retired with a .313 lifetime average. Elected 1963.

Known as the "Fordham Flash," Frankie Frisch jumped directly from Fordham University to the New York Giants and played o eight pennant winners in 19 seasons. A switch-hitter, Frisch compiled 11 straight .300 seasons and retired with numerous fielding records for second basemen. Recalling Frisch, writer Damon Runyon wrote, "Tell 'em most especially about the way Frisch played second base, some of center field and a slice of right field too." As player-manager (and later, manger) of the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch instilled the rollicking, all-out style of hard-nosed play that produced two World Series championships and prompted sportswriters to tab the Cardinals "The Gashouse Gang." Elected 1947.

One of three Hall of Famers to garner Most Valuable Awards at two different positions, (first base , 1935; outfield, 1940), Henry "Hank" Greenberg was one of the game's premier sluggers. Widely regarded as the first great Jewish ball player, Greenberg finished his career with 331 home runs, despite missing three full seasons and parts of two others while serving in the military. His big bat helped lead the Detroit Tigers to World Series titles in 1935 and 1945, batting .318 in four Fall Classics overall. Joe DiMaggio once said of Greenberg: "He was one of the truly great hitters, and when I first saw him at bat, he made my eyes pop out." Elected 1956.

Journalist Arthur Baer once noted, "Lefty Grove could throw a lamb past a wolf." Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove, arguably one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all time, was famous for his hard-headed, competitive nature. Connie Mack purchased him from the minor-league Baltimore Orioles for a then-record $100,600 in 1924, and Grimes pitche the Philadelphia Athletics to three straight AL pennants and two World Series titles from 1929 to 1931, going 19-15. He led the league in wins on four occasions, in winning percentage in five seasons, in strikeouts seven consecutive times, and in ERA a staggering nine times. Elected 1947.

Charles "Gabby" Hartnett excelled both behind the plate and at the plate, becoming the first backstop in history to slug 200 home runs and drive in 1,000 runs in a career. His catching prowess prompted pitcher Dizzy Dean to proclaim, "If I had that guy to pitch to all the time, I'd never lose a game." Hartnett, who spent 19 seasons with the Chicago Cubs - where he won four pennants - was named to the NL All-Star Game in the first six years the contest was held, starting behind the plate in 1934, 1936 and 1937. he also won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1935. Elected 1955.

Master of the screwball, left-handed "King Carl" Hubbell was one of the best pitchers of the 1930's. Unflappable on the mound Hubbell became a national sensation for striking out five straight Hall of Famers in the 1934 All-Star Game: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin. From 1929 to 1937, the New York Giants' "Meal Ticket" averaged 20 wins, led the club to three pennants and won the National League Most Valuable Player Award twice. Waite Hoyt claimed, "Hubbell is the greatest pitcher in the league. Elected 1947.

Tris Speaker once declared, "If I had the choice for any pitcher for a clutch game, the guy I'd pick would be Ted Lyons." Nearly every Sunday afternoon, Ted Lyons would take the mound for the Chicago White Sox, and the result was almost always the same; a victory.. Lyon, who won 260 games, abandoned his law school plans by signing with Chicago in 1923 and became a top draw for the club for 21 years. After a World War II stint in the Marines, Lyons returned to manage the Sox for three seasons. Elected 1955.

Joe McCarthy, the New York Yankees manager of the 1930s and early 1940s, finished his 24-year major league career with an all-time best winning percentage of .615 to go along with 2,125 wins. After winning one pennant with the Chicago Cubs, McCarthy won eight at the helm of the Yankees. Included in that were seven World Series championships, four of the consecutive, from 1936 to 1939. On six occasions, his teams won 100 or more games in a season. "I don't know where he learned all his psychology about ballplayers. He could handle almost anybody." claimed former Yankee outfielder Tommy Henrich. Elected 1957.

Known for his expertise of pitching and defense, Bill McKechnie became a highly successful manager after an 11-year playing career and was the first skipper to win pennants with three different National League clubs - the Pittsburgh Pirates (1925), St. Louis Cardinals (1928) and Cincinnati Reds (1939 and 1940). Former pitcher Johnny Vander Meer said, "He knew how to hold onto a one or two-run lead better than any other manager." In 1925 and 1940, "Deacon" led his clubs to World Series victories. He was also named Manager of the Year on two separate occasions, (1937 and 1940). Elected 1962.

Edgar C. "Sam" Rice could do wonderful things with a bat - like tallying 2,987 career hits. Longtime American League rival Ty Cobb said of Rice, "You couldn't appreciate Sam Rice enough unless you played against him." Rice's disputed catch in the 1925 World Series saved game 3 for the Washington Senators and remains one of baseball's most controversial plays. In a letter not to be opened until after his death, Rice wrote, in part, "I had a death grip on it. At no time did I lose possession of the ball." Elected 1963.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

One of the best line-drive hitters in history, Edd Roush swung a heavy bat and seldom struck out. His speed proved an asset in the field and on the basepaths. A shrewd businessman and a good baseball mind, Roush invested wisely and was independently wealthy by the time he retired. Contract squabbles often kept Roush from Spring Training, but he kept himself in such phenomenal shape year-round that manager Pat Moran once said, "All that fella has to do is wash his hands, adjust his cap and he's in shape to hit. Elected 1962.

Al Simmons grew up in a poor section of Milwaukee and was a classic case of local boy making good, playing parts of his first two professional seasons with the minor league Milwaukee Brewers. "Bucketfoot Al" was the consummate ballplayer - he could run, hit for power and average, and was an excellent fielder with a tremendous throwing arm. Paired with Jimmie Foxx on the Philadelphia Athletics, the two sluggers formed a dangerous 1-2 punch, leading the club to three straight appearances in the World Series (1929-1931). Simmons was a favorite of Connie Mack, who once said, "I wish I had nine players named Al Simmons." Elected 1953.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

Bill Terry referred to hitting as a business. With a lifetime .341 batting average - a modern National League record for left-handed batters - his business was a resounding success. The last player in the NL to top .400, Terry socked 254 hits in 1930, when he hit .401. An excellent fielder and team leader, he succeeded John McGraw as the New York Giants manager in 1932 and won three pennants and a World Series championship in the next six years. Elected 1954.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

Once described as, "170 pounds of scrap-iron, rawhide and guts," Zachariah Davis Wheat, was a model of consistency during a 19-year career, spent mostly with Brooklyn of the National League. Wheat's soft spoken demeanor belied a competitive fierceness on the diamond. Considered an intelligent ballplayer with impressive defensive skills, Wheat vexed his opponents with line-drive hitting, which netted 2,884 career hits. Beloved by the fans in Brooklyn, Wheat was remembered by Casey Stengel as "the only great ballplayer who was never booed." Elected 1959.

Sandaharu Oh, also known as Wang Chen-chih, is a retired Japanese-born Taiwanese baseball player and manager who played 22 seasons for the Yomiun Giants in Nippon Professional Baseball from 1959 to 1980. Oh holds the world lifetime home run record, having hit 868 home runs during his professional career. He established many NPB batting records, including RBI, slugging percentage, bases on balls, and on-base plus slugging in 1977. Oh became the first recipient of the People's Honour Award. He was inducted into the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers. During his career as a center, Abdul-Jabbar was a record six-time NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP), a record 19-time NBA All-Star, a 15-time All-NBA selection, and an 11-time NBA All-Defensive Team member. A member of six NBA championship teams as a player and two more as an assistant coach, Abdul-Jabbar twice was voted NBA Finals MVP. In 1996, he was honored as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. NBA coach Pat Riley and players Isiah Thomas and Julius Erving have called him the greatest basketball player of all time. After winning 71 consecutive basketball games on his high school team in New York City, Alcindor was recruited by Jerry Norman, the assistant coach of UCLA, where he played for coach John Wooden[7] on three consecutive national championship teams and was a record three-time MVP of the NCAA Tournament. Drafted with the first overall pick by the one-season-old Bucks franchise in the 1969 NBA draft, Alcindor spent six seasons in Milwaukee. After leading the Bucks to its first NBA championship at age 24 in 1971, he took the Muslim name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Using his trademark "skyhook" shot, he established himself as one of the league's top scorers. In 1975, he was traded to the Lakers, with whom he played the final 14 seasons of his career and won five additional NBA championships. Abdul-Jabbar's contributions were a key component in the "Showtime" era of Lakers basketball. Over his 20-year NBA career, his teams succeeded in making the playoffs 18 times and got past the first round 14 times; his teams reached the NBA Finals on 10 occasions. At the time of his retirement at age 42 in 1989, Abdul-Jabbar was the NBA's all-time leader in points scored (38,387), games played (1,560), minutes played (57,446), field goals made (15,837), field goal attempts (28,307), blocked shots (3,189), defensive rebounds (9,394), career wins (1,074), and personal fouls (4,657). He remains the all-time leader in points scored and career wins. He is ranked third all-time in both rebounds and blocked shots. In 2007, ESPN voted him the greatest center of all time, in 2008, they named him the "greatest player in college basketball history", and in 2016, they named him the second best player in NBA history (behind Michael Jordan) Abdul-Jabbar has also been an actor, a basketball coach, and a best-selling author. In 2012, he was selected by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to be a U.S. global cultural ambassador. In 2016, President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Clayton Edward Kershaw is a professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball. A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average and walks and hits per inning pitched average are the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. Kershaw has a career hits allowed per nine innings pitched average of 6.61 - the second lowest in MLB history - along with three Cy Young Awards and the 2014 National League MVP Award. He has been described throughout the majority of his career as the best pitcher in baseball.

James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 – December 31, 1980) was an American baseball pitcher who played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1915 to 1927. He batted and threw right-handed and served primarily as a starting pitcher. An adept batsman during his 15 year career, Shawkey compiled a .214 batting average (225-for-1049) with 90 runs, 3 home runs and 95 RBI. From 1920-1924, he drove in 59 runs for the New York Yankees. In 8 World Series games, he hit .267 (4-for-15) with 2 RBI. In 1970, Shawkey was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in Brookville, Pennsylvania. During the 1976 opening day festivities for the renovated Yankee Stadium, Shawkey threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

The '55 Pirates would finish the season in last place in the National League. But things were looking good as a young player named Roberto Clemente would join the team on April 17th. With Clemente on the roster, they would be 5 years away from a World Series victory! Elected 1973.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

A hard throwing southpaw with a devastating changeup and pinpoint control, William Hendrick Foster (Rube Foster's half-brother) was one of the best pitchers in the original Negro League. On the last day of the 1926 season, Foster won both ends of a crucial doubleheader to cinch the pennant for the Chicago American Giants. Then, in the ensuing World Series, he posted a 1.27 ERA. He was the leading vote-getter and winning pitcher in the inaugural East-West All-Star Game in 1933. Elected 1996.

Will Harridge - who worked for the American League for 48 years - started out as a ticket agent for the Wabash Railroad Company, where he handled booking and transportation for American League teams and umpires. In 1911, he was hired as personal secretary for AL president and founder Ben Johnson before becoming league secretary in 1927. Elected American League president in 1931, Harridge held that position until his retirement in 1958, later serving on the board of directors. During his record 28-year tenure, he presided over the birth of the All-Star Game in 1933 and maintained prosperity for the league. Elected 1972.

Harry Heilmann spent 15 of his 17 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, racking up an impressive .342 career batting average. Mentored by his teammate and manager, Ty Cobb, Heilmann won four batting titles in seven years from 1921 to 1927. "People nowadays just don't realize how great a hitter Harry was," Cobb said. "Next to Rogers Hornsby, he was the best right-handed hitter of them all." After his playing days were over, Heilmann spent 17 years in the Tigers broadcast booth. Elected 1952

Tough the power-hitting second baseman was overshadowed by his New York Yankees teammates, Tony "Poosh 'em up" Lazzeri was respected for his quiet leadership skills. A key member of seven pennant winners, he was a .300 hitter five times and drove in more than 100 runs seven times. In 1925, he belted 60 home runs and amassed and amassed 222 RBI for Salt Lake City of the Pacific Coast League. In 1927, hall of Fame manager Miller Huggins said of Lazzeri, "I've seen a few better second baseman, but not many. He has a phenomenal pair of hands, a great throwing arm and he covers acres of ground." Elected 1991.

Tough the power-hitting second baseman was overshadowed by his New York Yankees teammates, Tony "Poosh 'em up" Lazzeri was respected for his quiet leadership skills. A key member of seven pennant winners, he was a .300 hitter five times and drove in more than 100 runs seven times. In 1925, he belted 60 home runs and amassed and amassed 222 RBI for Salt Lake City of the Pacific Coast League. In 1927, hall of Fame manager Miller Huggins said of Lazzeri, "I've seen a few better second baseman, but not many. He has a phenomenal pair of hands, a great throwing arm and he covers acres of ground." Elected 1991.

Henry Emmett "Heinie" Manush was one of seven sons, six of whom played professional baseball. A left-handed, line drive hitting outfielder, Manush consistently ranked among the game's top batters. In 1926, he hit .378 to lead the American League, and his lifetime average was .330 over a 17-year career. In a 1977 interview, Joe Cronin said of Manush, "If he'd catch 'em playing back, he'd dump a bunt. If they moved in on him, Heinie slapped the ball by 'em." Elected 1964.

Henry Emmett "Heinie" Manush was one of seven sons, six of whom played professional baseball. A left-handed, line drive hitting outfielder, Manush consistently ranked among the game's top batters. In 1926, he hit .378 to lead the American League, and his lifetime average was .330 over a 17-year career. In a 1977 interview, Joe Cronin said of Manush, "If he'd catch 'em playing back, he'd dump a bunt. If they moved in on him, Heinie slapped the ball by 'em." Elected 1964.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

Francis Joseph "Lefty" O'Doul (March 4, 1897 – December 7, 1969) was an American Major League Baseball player who went on to become an extraordinarily successful manager in the minor leagues. He was also a vital figure in the establishment of professional baseball in Japan. Born in San Francisco, California, O'Doul began his professional career as a left-handed pitcher with the minor-league San Francisco Seals of the Triple-A Pacific Coast League. He had some major-league success with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox from 1919 to 1923 as a reliever. In 1927, he became one of what are today four Pacific Coast League hitters to have had a 30 home runs, 30 stolen bases season, along with Joc Pederson (2014), Frank Demaree (1934), and Hall of Famer Tony Lazzeri (1925). O'Doul returned to the majors in 1928, where he batted .319 as a platoon player. In 1929, he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies and, teaming up with Chuck Klein, had one of the best offensive years in baseball history, leading the league in batting at .398 with 254 hits, 32 home runs, 122 runs batted in, and 152 runs scored. His hit total broke the previous National League record of 250 by Rogers Hornsby of the 1922 St. Louis Cardinals. The record was tied by Bill Terry in 1930. After batting .383 with 22 homers during the 1930 season, O'Doul was traded to the Brooklyn Robins (now the Los Angeles Dodgers). In 1932, he batted .368 for Brooklyn to win another league batting title. After a slow start in 1933, when he batted just .252 through 43 games, O'Doul was again traded, this time back to the Giants. He rallied to hit .306 the rest of the way that season, but played just one more year before ending his career in 1934. In an 11-year major league career, he was in 970 games played, 34 games as a relief pitcher and the rest as an outfielder, posting a .349 batting average (1140-for-3264) with 624 runs scored, 175 doubles, 41 triples, 113 home runs, and 542 RBI. His on-base percentage was .413 and slugging percentage was .532. In seven seasons between 1928 and 1934, when he became a regular outfielder, he hit .353 (1126-for-3192). O'Doul hit over .300 six times, missing only in 1933 when he hit .284 playing with the Dodgers and Giants.

Herb Pennock, known as "The Knight of Kennett Square," was a solid southpaw hurler for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox, but made his biggest impact as a member of the New York Yankees. Pennock's first manager in New York, Miller Huggins, called him the greatest left-hander in the history of baseball, saying if Pennock's head was cut open, "The weakness of every batter in the league would fall out." Pennock's Yankees teams won five pennants and four World Series crowns, promoting manager Joe McCarthy to say: "I am going to pitch Pennock in spots this season - the tough ones." Elected 1948.

Eppa Rixey, a tall and lean lefty, battled National League hitters for more than two decades. "How dumb can the hitters in this league get?" questioned Rixey in trying to explain his success. "When their hitting with the count two balls and no strikes, or three and one, they're always looking for the fastball. And they never get it." He retired with 266 wins, then tops among NL southpaws. "(Rixey) was a fierce competitor and a hard loser," said Clyde Sukeforth. "When he pitched, you didn't have to ask who won the game - all you had to do was look at the clubhouse later." Elected 1963.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

"Roger is a fighter. He was a fighter when a pupil of [John] McGraw's and he has instilled this fighting spirit into his team" Fred Lieb wrote in Baseball Magazine. Roger Bresnahan broke in with the Washington Senators in 1897, hurling a shutout in his debut. As a catcher and center fielder, the versatile Bresnahan was a key component of the New York Giants' pennant winners in 1904 and 1905. Later, Bresnahan served as a player-manager for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs. In 1907, he was the first catcher to don shin guards, helping to revolutionize the position. Elected 1945.

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Wilbert Robinson rose to prominence as a catcher for the savvy, hard-nosed Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s. In 1892, he lashed a record seven hits in a nine-inning game. Robinson moved on to coach with the New York Giants, but after a falling out with long-time friend and Giants manager, John McGraw, Robinson left to become manager of the rival Brooklyn franchise. During his tenure, the Dodgers were nicknamed the "Robins" in his honor. Affectionately dubbed "Uncle Robbie" thanks to an easygoing and fatherly attitude, the long-time Brooklyn manager guided his teams to two National League pennants. Elected 1945.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

Owner Jacob Ruppert, a visionary leader, transformed the New York Yankees from a second division afterthought to the most storied franchise in the game's long history. The brewery executive and former U.S. Congressman partnered with Tillinghest Huston, to purchase the middling team in 1915. Over a few short years, they assembled a formidable group, including manager Miller Huggins, front office executive Ed Barrow and slugger Babe Ruth. After opening Yankee Stadium in 1923, the club won its first World Series championship. The Yankees collected 10 pennants and seven Fall Classic crowns during Ruppert's tenure, which ended with his death in 1939. Elected 2013.

A member of the 1903 World Series champions, Jimmy Collins was a magician with the glove and a terror with the bat. A feared clutch hitter for the Boston ball clubs, he batted .346 in 1897 and the following season led the National League in home runs with 15. Collins hit .300 or better five times and was Boston's player-manager for its first six seasons in the upstart American League. His defensive wizardry at the hot corner neutralized the opposition's bunting tactics. Elected 1945.

Alvin Floyd Crowder (January 11, 1899 – April 3, 1972), nicknamed "General", was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played eleven seasons in the American League with the Washington Senators, the St. Louis Browns, and the Detroit Tigers. In 402 career games, Crowder pitched 2344.1 innings and posted a win-loss record of 167–115, with 150 complete games, 16 shutouts, and a 4.12 earned run average (ERA).

Hazen Cuyler's minor league teammates would shout a shortened version of his surname, "Cuy! Cuy!," allowing their star outfielder to take fly balls they could not reach. Cuyler thus earned the nickname, "Kiki." A powerful clutch hitter with blazing speed, Cuyler broke into the major leagues with the Pittsburgh Pirates, leading them to the pennant and smashing a dramatic two-run double off Walter Johnson to win the 1925 World Series. Cuyler later enjoyed several banner seasons with the Chicago Cubs, topping the league in stolen bases his first three years with the club and clouting a bases-loaded triple to clinch the 1932 NL pennant. Elected 1968.

Martin Dihigo Llanos was perhaps the most versatile player in baseball history, known as "El Maestro." Dihigo spent more than 12 seasons in the Negro Leagues. He also starred in leagues in Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. Johnny Mize said of the Cuban-born star: "He was the only guy I ever saw who could play all nine positions, run, manage and switch-hit." In the 1938 Mexican League, Dihigo went 18-2, led the league with a 0.90 ERA and won the batting crown with a .387 mark. He totaled more than 260 wins while smashing his way to three Negro League home run crowns. Elected 1977

Joseph Anthony (Joe) Dugan (May 12, 1897 – July 7, 1982), was an American professional baseball player.[1] Nicknamed "Jumping Joe", he was considered one of the best defensive third basemen of his era.[2][3] He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop and third baseman from 1917 through 1931, most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees, with whom he played in five World Series.

Clark Griffith was a baseball pioneer his entire life. In 1901, "The Old Fox" became a player-manager for the Chicago White Sox in the new American League, leading them to a pennant. Griffith managed until 1920, when he became the Washington Senators principal owner after being a part owner since 1912. Innovative with limited finances, he won three pennants, hired entertainers for fans to enjoy and signed many Cuban players. "He was the greatest humanitarian who ever lived, and the greatest pillar of honesty ever had," said Bobo Newsom. "I never played for a better man. Elected 1946.

Many feel Hodges should be in the Hall of Fame but it has not happened yet. He would play for the Brooklyn Dodgers and LA Dodgers winning 3 World Series and would be selected to 8 All Star Teams. He would also lead the NY Mets to their first World Series defeating the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles.

"Shrewd" is the word best used to describe Miller Huggins. A smart second baseman who always found a way to get on base, the 5-foot 6-inch "Hug" skippered the St Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees for 17 seasons, leading the Bronx Bombers to their first six pennants and three World Series championships, effectively beginning the Yankees dynasty. In 1932, a monument to the "Mighty Mite" was dedicated and placed in center field at Yankee Stadium in his memory.

Leading the Detroit Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants, Hughie Jennings was no stranger to success. As a shortstop with a propensity to for being hit by pitched balls, the freckle-faced redhead helped the Baltimore Orioles to three straight National League pennants and four trips to the Temple Cup, (precursor to the World Series) during the 1890's. The man from Pennsylvania coal country was noted for the perpetual grin on his face that umpire Tim Hurst claimed "echoes." Elected 1945.

Leading the Detroit Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants, Hughie Jennings was no stranger to success. As a shortstop with a propensity to for being hit by pitched balls, the freckle-faced redhead helped the Baltimore Orioles to three straight National League pennants and four trips to the Temple Cup, (precursor to the World Series) during the 1890's. The man from Pennsylvania coal country was noted for the perpetual grin on his face that umpire Tim Hurst claimed "echoes." Elected 1945.

Joseph James Kelley was a perennial .300 hitter and a member of five pennant winners during the 1890's. Kelley could seemingly do it all. Always a team leader, the left fielder was a supremely confident individual. On Labor Day 1894, Kelley put on one of the greatest offensive displays in major league history when he went 9-for-9 in a double-deader, hitting four consecutive doubles off Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young. Elected 1971.

Ernie Lombardi, legendary for his powerful drives, hit with his fingers interlocked so he could grip his bat - the league's heaviest - closer to the end. In a 17-year career, Lombardi batted .306 and captured the 1938 NL MVP Award and a pair of batting titles (1938 and 1942). Lombardi had an outstanding throwing arm, rifling the ball with a side-armed release from the crouch position. Lombardi once stated: "I told ever batter what the pitch would be, and we still won." Lombardi was behind the plate for Johnny Vander Meer's consecutive no-hitters in 1938. Elected 1986.

Co-owner and business manager of the Newark Eagles from 1936 to 1948, Effa Manley was noted for running one of the most professional organizations in the Negro Leagues. Using her position with Newark to crusade for civil rights, Manley made the Eagles a social force off the field and a baseball force on it, as the club was usually a top-division team and won the Negro League World Series in 1946. With the sale of Monte Irvin to the New York Giants, Manley established that major league clubs should respect the contracts of the Negro Leagues by offering financial compensation. Elected 2006.

"Walter Maranville is the greatest player to enter baseball since Ty Cobb arrived," raved Boston Braves manager George Stallings. Maranville compensated for his lack of size with an overabundance of energy and determination. During his 23-year major league career, spent exclusively in the National League, the wide-ranging infielder accumulated a record 5,139 putouts at shortstop and developed a reputation for eye-popping "basket catches." Maranville finished in the top ten for the NL MVP Award five times, including a runner-up finish in 1914 after being a key member of the "Miracle Braves." Elected 1954.

Johnny Leonard Roosevelt "Pepper" Martin (February 29, 1904 – March 5, 1965) was an American professional baseball player and minor league manager. He was known as the Wild Horse of the Osage because of his daring, aggressive baserunning abilities. Martin played in Major League Baseball as a third baseman and an outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1930s and early 1940s. He was best known for his heroics during the 1931 World Series, in which he was the catalyst in a Cardinals' upset victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. Martin was an integral member of the Cardinals' teams of the 1930s that became known as the Gashouse Gang for their roguish behavior and practical jokes. Martin was even referred to as the inspiration for the pre-game warmup routine of "pepper. Early in his career, he was labeled by some contemporary press reports as the next Ty Cobb because of his spirited, hustling style of play. However, because his headlong attitude on the playing field took a physical toll on his body, he never lived up to those initial expectations. After the end of his playing career, he continued his career in baseball as a successful minor league baseball manager.

Edgar Martinez (January 2, 1963 -) is the only full-time designated hitter in Major League Baseball history to win a batting title, and has garnered significant consideration for Hall of Fame induction possibly making him the first DH to achieve such an honor. Edgar signed with the Seattle Mariners in 1982 and was widely recognized for his glove rather than his bat. Playing in the minor league until 1987 and finally finding a regular spot in 1990, Edgar made the best of his new job as he batted .302 with 11 home runs and 49 RBI as a third baseman. In1992. He led the American League in doubles with 47 and batting average with a .343 mark. By 1995, the Mariners used Martinez strictly as a designated hitter and he responded leading the AL in games (145), runs (121), doubles (52), batting average (.356) and on-base percentage (.479). He won his second of five Silver Sluggers, earned his second of seven All-Star appearances and finished third in AL MVP voting. Playing much of his career hitting behind sluggers Ken Griffey, Jr., Jay Buhner and Alex Rodriguez, once Martinez became the undisputed Mariners DH his number were staggering as he averaged a .316 BA, 156 hits, 36 doubles, 25 HRs and 99 RBI from 1995 to 2004. His numbers even rose as Seattle traded or lost high-profile players to free agency. Edgar is often remembered for his clutch hitting, most significantly when he hit a doubles against the New York Yankees in the 1995 ALDS to put them into the ALCS against the Cleveland Indians. The shot is known in the Settle area as "The Double." Edgar Martinez ended his career, entirely played with the Mariners (1987-2004), with a .312 career batting average, 2,247 hits including 514 doubles and 309 home runs, 1,219 runs and 1,261 RBI. In 2004, Major League Baseball renamed the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award the Edgar Martinez Outstanding Designated Hitter Award. edgar Martinez was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019.

"There has only been one manager, and his name is John McGraw," Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack once declared. McGraw was a fiery third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles in the 1890's, but he received much more recognition as an innovative, autocratic field manager. In his 31 years at the helm of the New York Giants, McGraw's teams won 10 pennants, finished second 10 times, and won three World Series titles. "Little Napoleon" finished his career with 2,763 managerial wins. As a player, he was credited with helping to develop the hit-and-run, the "Baltimore Chop," the squeeze play and other strategic moves. Elected 1937.

Born in Akron, Ohio, Munson was selected as the fourth pick of the 1968 MLB draft and was named as the catcher on the 1968 College Baseball All-American Team. Munson hit over .300 in his two seasons in the minor leagues, establishing himself as a top prospect. He became the Yankees' starting catcher late in the 1969 season, and after his first complete season in 1970, in which he batted .302, he was voted AL Rookie of the Year. Consi9dered the "heart and soul" of the Yankees, Munson was named captain of the Yankees in 1976, the team's first since Lou Gehrig. That same year, he won the AL MVP Award, making him the only Yankee to win the Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. Munson led the Yankees to three consecutive World Series appearances from 1976 to 1978, winning championships in the latter two years. He is the first player in baseball history to be named a College Baseball All-American and then in MLB win a Rookie of the Year Award, MVP Award, Gold Glove Award, and World Series championship. He is also the only catcher in MLB postseason history to record at least a .300+ batting average (.357). 20 RBIs (22), and 20 defensive caught stealing's (24). During an off day in the summer of 1969, Munson died at age 32 while practicing landing his Cessna Citation aircraft at Akron-Canton Airport. He suffered a broken neck as a result of the crash, and his cause of death was asphyxiations. The Yankees honored him immediately retiring his uniform 15, and dedicating a plaque to him in Monument Park.

Delbert Rice Jr. (27 October 1922 – 26 January 1983) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played for 17 seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1945 to 1961, most notably for the St. Louis Cardinals. Although Rice was a relatively weak hitter, he sustained a lengthy career in the major leagues due to his valuable defensive abilities. A native of Portsmouth, Ohio, Rice attended Portsmouth High School where he starred in football, basketball and track as well as baseball.[2] He was contracted as an amateur free agent by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1941. Although Rice received his induction notice into the military in 1943, he was turned down because of a physical disqualification.[2] After playing in the minor leagues for four seasons, he made his major league debut with the Cardinals on 2 May, 1945 at the age of 22. Shortly after the season began, the Cardinals sold the contract for their star catcher, Walker Cooper to the New York Giants, leaving Rice to share catching duties with Ken O'Dea. Although they competed for the same job, the veteran O'Dea, who had played with Hall of Fame catcher Gabby Hartnett in Chicago during the 1930s, provided Rice with valuable help in learning the intricacies of catching in the major leagues. Rice posted a .261 batting average in 83 games as the Cardinals finished in second place, three games behind the Chicago Cubs. Although he served as a backup catcher to Joe Garagiola in 1946, he regularly played whenever Harry Brecheen pitched. The Cardinals ended the season tied for first place with the Brooklyn Dodgers and the two teams met in the 1946 National League tie-breaker series. It was the first playoff tiebreaker in Major League Baseball history. The Cardinals won the first two games of the best-of-three game series to capture the National League pennant. In the 1946 World Series against the Boston Red Sox, Rice caught all three of Brecheen's victories, as the Cardinals defeated the Red Sox in seven games. He was also the hitting standout in Game 2, with a single, a double and a walk, scoring two runs in the Cardinals' 3-0 victory. In 1947, Rice caught the majority of the team's games and guided the Cardinals' pitching staff to the lowest team earned run average and the most strikeouts in the National League, as the Cardinals finished in second place to the Dodgers. His pitch-calling skills were made evident once again in 1949, leading the Cardinals' pitching staff to the lowest team earned run average in the league, as the Cardinals once again finished in second place, one game behind the Dodgers. Rice had his best season in 1952, posting a .259 batting average along with 11 home runs and a career-high 65 runs batted in. He also led National League catchers in games played, putouts, assists and in baserunners caught stealing. The following season, Rice was named as a reserve player for the National League team in the 1953 All-Star Game.

Alexander Emmanuel Rodriguez, nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American former professional baseball shortstop and third baseman. He played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Seattle Mariners, Texas Rangers, and New York Yankees. Rodriguez began his professional career as one of the sport's most highly touted prospects and is considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. Rodriguez amassed a .295 batting average, 696 home runs, over 2,000 RBI, over 2,000 runs scored, and over 3,000 hits. He is a 14-time All-Star and won three American League MVP Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodriguez is the career record holder for grand slams with 25. He signed two of the most lucrative sports contracts in history, but his career was highly controversial. He incurred criticism from the media for his behavior and the use of performance enhancing drugs.

Still an American icon decades after his death, George Herman "Babe" Ruth emerged from humble beginnings to become the game's greatest slugger and gate attraction. Ruth hit home runs at a prodigious rate - his single season output often exceeded those of entire major league teams. He retired with 714 career home runs, at a time when only tow other players had reached 300. He also posted a record of 94-46 in 163 games as a pitcher, most coming before he became a regular in the outfield. Reggie Jackson once deflected a comparison to "The Sultan of Swat," saying, "There will never be another Babe Ruth. He was the greatest home run hitter who ever lived." Elected 1936.

Hilton Smith often found himself in the shadow of the legendary Negro League pitcher Satchel Paige - not because of lack of skill, but rather Smith's quiet laid-back personality. "There was nobody better in this whole world (than Hilton)," declared Negro League legend Buck O'Neil. Smith, credited with 20-or-more wins in each of his 12 seasons with the Kansas City Monarchs, played in six consecutive East-West All-Star Games between 1937 and 1942. He also helped lead the Monarchs to seven pennants. Elected 2001.

The game's premier pitcher of the 1870s, A.G. Spalding led the league in victories in each of his six full seasons. His 47 wins in 1876 keyed the Chicago White Stockings' drive to the inaugural National League championship. One year later, he turned his boundless energies to the sporting goods business and executive roles with the White Stockings, where he gained renown as the era's top promoter of baseball as the national game, "The genius of our institutions is democratic," Spalding maintained. "Baseball is a democratic game." Elected 1939.

One of the most prolific home run hitters in the Negro Leagues, Norman "Turkey" Stearns spent his summers blasting baseballs for the Detroit Stars and his winters laboring in the Motor City's auto plants. Satchel Paige called the left-handed Stearns "one of the greatest hitters we ever had, as good as anybody who ever played." Stearns generated his power with strong shoulders and an unusual , open stance. A swift center fielder renowned for his fielding, Stearnes was regarded by "Cool Papa" Bell as "one of the best all-around ballplayers. Elected 2000.

Robert Trowbridge (June 27, 1930 – April 3, 1980) was an American professional baseball player, a pitcher who appeared in all or parts of five seasons (1956–60) for the Milwaukee Braves and Kansas City Athletics. A right-hander, he was listed as 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and 180 pounds (82 kg). He was a member of the 1957 World Series champion Braves. After he followed that by posting a 13–8 record in Triple-A in 1955, Trowbridge made the Braves' MLB roster in 1956 out of spring training. He was used sparingly as a relief pitcher in the season's early weeks and sent back to Triple-A in May to get more work. Recalled at the end of June, he became a "swing man" on the Milwaukee pitching staff, getting four starts and 13 relief assignments over the rest of the season. He notched his first MLB complete game on August 8 in a six-hit, 10–1 triumph over the St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee County Stadium. As a rookie, he posted a career-best 2.66 earned run average in 502/3 innings pitched. In 1957, Trowbridge worked in 32 games as a member of the Brave staff, sandwiched around a three-game stint at Triple-A. He won a MLB-career-high seven games and worked in 126 innings, another career mark. Trowbridge again was a swing man, with 16 starts and 16 relief appearances. On September 2, he threw a complete game shutout, a three-hitter against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field, striking out nine.[3] It would be the only shutout of his big-league career. But his seven victories contributed to the Braves' 1957 National League pennant, their first title in nine years and their first in Milwaukee. In the 1957 World Series, he appeared in one inning in relief of Game 3. Inheriting a 7–3 deficit to the New York Yankees, Trowbridge allowed only two hits, but he issued three bases on balls and surrendered five earned runs, three of them coming on a home run by Tony Kubek.[4] It would be his only Fall Classic appearance, but the Braves triumphed in seven games to become world champions. His first two major league seasons would prove to be Trowbridge's best. He spent all of both 1958 and 1959 with Milwaukee, but worked in only 43 total games (with four starts), and was not called upon when the Braves made a return trip to the World Series in 1958. His final appearance in 1959, and as a Brave, occurred on August 18, five weeks before Milwaukee met the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1959 National League tie-breaker series. The Braves sold Trowbridge's contract during the 1959–60 off-season to the Kansas City Athletics, a second-division team in the American League, and he finished his MLB career there in 1960, making one start and relieving in 21 other games before being sent to Triple-A. He ended his pro career in 1961. As a major leaguer, Trowbridge compiled a 13–13 record with a 3.95 earned run average and 201 strikeouts in 116 appearances and 3301/3 innings pitched, allowing 324 hits and 156 bases on balls. He had four complete games, one shutout and five saves.

James Leslie "Hippo" Vaughn was a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. In a career that spanned thirteen seasons, he played for the New York Highlanders, the Washington Senators, and the Chicago Cubs. Vaughn won over 20 games in give seasons for the Cubs. His highlight year was 1918, where he won a National League leading 22 inn 1918, when the season was ended a month early due to government restrictions brought on by World War I. That same year Vaughn also led the National League in earned run average and strikeouts to become the ninth triple crown winner in the modern era and the fifteenth overall. His nickname of "Hippo" came from his height and weight of 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds.

James Leslie "Hippo" Vaughn was a left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. In a career that spanned thirteen seasons, he played for the New York Highlanders, the Washington Senators, and the Chicago Cubs. Vaughn won over 20 games in give seasons for the Cubs. His highlight year was 1918, where he won a National League leading 22 inn 1918, when the season was ended a month early due to government restrictions brought on by World War I. That same year Vaughn also led the National League in earned run average and strikeouts to become the ninth triple crown winner in the modern era and the fifteenth overall. His nickname of "Hippo" came from his height and weight of 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds.

Samuel Filmore West (October 5, 1904 – November 23, 1985) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams from 1927 to 1942. West batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Longview, Texas. West entered the majors in 1927 with the Washington Senators, playing six years for them before moving to the St. Louis Browns (1933–1938), again with Washington (1938–1941), and the Chicago White Sox (1942). His most productive season came in 1931 when he posted a career-high .333 batting average and reached career highs in slugging percentage (.481), hits (175), doubles (43), triples (13), and rbi (91). In 1933, he was selected to the first All-Star Game ever played, being selected again in 1934, 1935 and 1937. During his career, West collected a .300 average during eight seasons; led AL outfielders in putouts twice, double plays three times, and assists once, and four times was considered in the AL Most Valuable Player vote. Although he played with Washington during ten seasons, he missed the American League pennant-winning team that lost the 1933 World Series to the New York Giants after being traded to the Browns in exchange for Goose Goslin. In a sixteen-season career, West was a .299 hitter (1838-for-6148) with 75 home runs and 838 RBI in 1753 games, including 934 runs, 347 doubles, 101 triples, 53 stolen bases, a .371 on-base percentage, and a .425 slugging percentage. Defensively, he posted a .983 fielding percentage. Following his playing career, West served in the U.S. Army during World War II. After discharge from the service, he spent three years as a coach with the Senators.

George Wright was an accomplished cricket player who helped transform baseball into the National Pastime. Wright was a star on the first all-professional team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings. In addition to possessing excellent hitting skills, Wright revolutionized the role of the shortstop. Hall of Famer Jim O'Rourke said, "George Wright never had any equal as a fielder, base runner and batsman, combined with heady work of a quality never accredited to any ball tosser. All his qualifications taken together, he was really in a class by himself." Elected 1937.

As a player, manger and owner, Cumberland "Cum" Posey was the driving force behind the Homestead Grays - one of the most successful teams in the Negro Leagues history - for 35 years - Posey's business acumen and organizational skills made the Grays a perennial powerhouse and money-making machine. Skilled at talent evaluation and development, Posey's teams produced a number of future Hall of Famers. Homestead split its "home" games between Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., regularly drawing 25,000 to 30,000 fans at Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. His teams won nine consecutive Negro National League pennants from 1937 to 1945, including three championships. Elected 2006

As a player, manger and owner, Cumberland "Cum" Posey was the driving force behind the Homestead Grays - one of the most successful teams in the Negro Leagues history - for 35 years - Posey's business acumen and organizational skills made the Grays a perennial powerhouse and money-making machine. Skilled at talent evaluation and development, Posey's teams produced a number of future Hall of Famers. Homestead split its "home" games between Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., regularly drawing 25,000 to 30,000 fans at Forbes Field and Griffith Stadium. His teams won nine consecutive Negro National League pennants from 1937 to 1945, including three championships. Elected 2006

Suffering from epilepsy and haunted by his experience in combat during World War I, Grover Cleveland "Pete" Alexander still managed to win 373 games during a 20-year career. He led the National League in ERA on five occasions, wins in six seasons, complete games six times and shutouts during seven campaigns. Alexander also won 30-or-more games in three consecutive seasons. Elected 1938.

Scrappy Nellie Fox was a catalyst for the "Go-Go" Chicago White Sox of the 1950's. The 15-time All-Star was the 1959 American League Most Valuable Player, leading Chicago to its first World Series in 40 years. He led the AL in hits four times and fewest strikeouts 11 times. New York Yankees ace Whitey Ford said, "In 12 years, I struck him out once....and I think the umpire blew the call," a comment lament of pitchers who had to face the pesky left. Fox captured three Gold Glove Awards and set a major league record for consecutive games played at second base. Elected 1997.

Scrappy Nellie Fox was a catalyst for the "Go-Go" Chicago White Sox of the 1950's. The 15-time All-Star was the 1959 American League Most Valuable Player, leading Chicago to its first World Series in 40 years. He led the AL in hits four times and fewest strikeouts 11 times. New York Yankees ace Whitey Ford said, "In 12 years, I struck him out once....and I think the umpire blew the call," a comment lament of pitchers who had to face the pesky left. Fox captured three Gold Glove Awards and set a major league record for consecutive games played at second base. Elected 1997.

Charles Hebert Klein was a powerful hitter who captured the Triple Crown in 1933, also nabbing three other home run titles. A .320 hitter in 17 seasons, Klein totaled 300 home runs and was named to the first two National League All-Star teams (1933 and 1934). Strong enough to wield a 42-once bat, Klein possessed all-around talent as a superb defensive right fielder. The 1932 NL MVP, Klein four years later became the first 20th-centruy player in the senior circuit to slug four home runs in a game. Elected 1980.

Walter O'Malley was among one of the most influential baseball team owners of the last half of the 20th century. he was a persuasive and visionary businessman who altered the big league landscape with seismic force by moving his Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. Thwarted in attempts to replace an outdated Ebbets Field, O'Malley led baseball's geographic expansion west after the 1957 season by relocating his team to California, while convincing the New York Giants to follow suit. Under O'Malley's ownership, the Dodgers became the "gold standard" of baseball franchises winning 11 pennants and four World Series titles. Elected 2008.

Connie Mack won five World Series titles, a record nine American League pennants, and 3,731 games, nearly 1,00o more than any other manager in history. Still, "The Tall Tactician," is best remembered as a dignified leader who donned a business suit to dispense wisdom to a generation of players. "Your born with two strikes against you, so don't take a third one on your own," Mack was fond of stating to his clubs. Though his entrance to baseball came by playing catcher for 11 seasons, in 1901 Mack assumed control of the Philadelphia Athletics, the team he would lead for the next 50 years. Elected 1937.

Donald Arthur Mattingly (born April 20, 1961) is an American former professional baseball first baseman, coach and current manager for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Nicknamed "The Hit Man" and "Donnie Baseball", he spent his entire 14-year career playing with the New York Yankees and later managed the Los Angeles Dodgers for five years. Mattingly graduated from Reitz Memorial High School in Evansville, Indiana, and was selected by the Yankees in the amateur draft. Debuting with the Yankees in 1982 after three seasons in minor league baseball, Mattingly emerged as the Yankees' starting first baseman after a successful rookie season in 1983. Mattingly was named to the American League (AL) All-Star team six times. He won nine Gold Glove Awards (an American League record for a first baseman), three Silver Slugger Awards, the 1984 AL batting title, and was the 1985 AL Most Valuable Player. Mattingly served as captain of the Yankees from 1991 through 1995, when he retired as a player. The Yankees later retired Mattingly's uniform number, 23. Mattingly is the only Yankee to have his number retired without having won a World Series with the team. Returning to the Yankees as a coach in 2004 for manager Joe Torre, he followed Torre to the Dodgers in 2008, and succeeded him as the Dodgers' manager in 2011. The Dodgers and Mattingly mutually parted ways after the 2015 season, and he became manager of the Miami Marlins.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

Winner of four home run titles, Lewis Robert "Hack" Wilson packed a wallop in his 12-year career. Known for his compact stature, Wilson was described by sportswriter Thomas Holmes thusly; "There is Wilson, a giant of a little man, one who looks as though he might have been battered down to his five-foot six-inches by a ponderous blacksmith's hammer." Holmes also opined that "[Wilson's] feet are in proportion to his height - they are the feet of a ballet dancer or bantamweight fighter." Wilson's 1930 season still inspires awe: a record 191 RBI, 56 home runs and a .356 batting average. Elected 1979.

"That old paw served me pretty well in its time," said Mordecai Brown. "it gave me a firmer grip on the ball, so I could spin it over the hump, it gave me a greater dip." After his pitching hand was mangled in a farm-machine accident as a youth, Brown became known as "Three-Finger." Despite the injury, Brown was one of the National League's best pitchers of the early 20th century, winning 239 games - nearly 65 percent of his starts. He posted six 20-win seasons and once beat Christy Mathewson in nine straight matchups. Brown's Chicago Cubs won four NL pennants and two World Series championships. Elected 1949.

Colorful and flamboyant, Bill Klem brought dignity and respect to his profession. Know as "The Old Arbitrator," he umpired almost exclusively behind the plate his first 16 years because of his superior ability to call balls and strikes. Klem was among the first to use arm signals to coincide with his calls. Proof of is skill and universal respect were his 18 World Series assignments. Klem umpired from 1905 to 1941 and the served as chief of National League umpires. When honored at the Polo Grounds on September 2, 1949, he declared: "Baseball to me is not a game; it is a religion." Elected 1953.

Branch Rickey spent a half a century as a baseball visionary. With the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1920s and 1930s, Rickey invented the modern farm system, promoting a new way of training and developing players. After joining the Brooklyn Dodgers, Rickey became the first executive to challenge baseball's color line when he signed Jackie Robinson, who in 1947 would become the major leagues' first African American player in the 20th century. When Robinson asked Rickey if he was looking for a Negro who was afraid to fight back, Rickey replied, "No, I'm looking for a ballplayer with the guts enough not to." Elected 1967.

Branch Rickey spent a half a century as a baseball visionary. With the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1920s and 1930s, Rickey invented the modern farm system, promoting a new way of training and developing players. After joining the Brooklyn Dodgers, Rickey became the first executive to challenge baseball's color line when he signed Jackie Robinson, who in 1947 would become the major leagues' first African American player in the 20th century. When Robinson asked Rickey if he was looking for a Negro who was afraid to fight back, Rickey replied, "No, I'm looking for a ballplayer with the guts enough not to." Elected 1967.

George "Sparky" Anderson was the first manager in history to win World Series championships in both the American and National leagues, doing so with the Detroit Tigers and the Cincinnati Reds. His career totals include 2,194 victories, two manager of the year awards, five league pennants and three World Series crowns. Elected 2000.

Manning the Chicago White Sox shortstop position throughout his 20-year career, Luke Appling proved to be a consistent fielder, solid batter and fan favorite. As a leadoff hitter, he was known for his ability to intentionally foul off pitches until hitting the pitch he wanted. Appling twice captured American League batting titles and finished with a .310 lifetime batting average. He collected 2,749 career hits. The seven-time All-Star also was selected as the Chicago White Sox's greatest player by Chicago fans in 1969. Elected 1964.

Among the most reliable leadoff batters in history, Richie Ashburn was a solid center fielder and consistent hitter who sprayed hits to all fields for the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit better than .300 during nine of 15 seasons, twice capturing the National League batting titles, while finishing second two other times. A .308 lifetime batter, Ashburn also led the NL in walks four times. A six-time All-Star selection "Whitey" transitioned to the broadcast booth following his career to become a popular Phillies announcer for more than three decades. Elected 1995.

Perhaps the subject of the most well known deadline deal in history, Jeff Bagwell proved to be the perfect fit in Houston. Traded by his hometown Red Sox before he ever appeared in a big league game, Bagwell won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1991 with his patient approach at the plate. By 1994, Bagwell added power in his resume, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 116 runs in that strike-shortened campaign to win the NL MVP Award. In 15 big league seasons, all spent with the Astros, the four time All-Star hit .297 with 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI and a .408 on base percentage. Elected 2017.

Heir to Honus Wagner's throne, Bancroft was the senior circuit's best shortstop in the late 1910's and 1920's. His play was, like his nickname, a thing of "Beauty". Bancroft is a very rare Hall of Fame autograph, especially on yellow plaque postcards because he was inducted in 1971 and died the following year.

Roy Campanella broke into baseball with the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro National League at age 16 and joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948. He was selected to eight All-Star Games and played in five World Series. Strong defensively, "Campy" also was a star with the bat, setting then-records for single-season (41) and career (242) home runs by a catcher. He won three National League Most Valuable Player Awards (1951. 1953 and 1955). His playing career was cut short by an automobile accident in 1958. Elected 1969.

"He's got everything - intelligence, strength, confidence, speed afoot and hand-eye coordination," manager Gene Mauch said of Rod Carew. "Many ballplayers are pleasant to manage, but managing Rod is a privilege." Carew was a pure hitter, who as pitcher Ken Holtzman described, "could move the bat around as if it were a magic wand." In 19 seasons with the Minnesota Twins and California Angels, Carew won seven American League batting titles, hitting .300-or-better for 15 consecutive seasons while compiling a .328 career average. He won the 1967 AL Rookie of the Year Award and the 1977 AL Most Valuable Player Award, and was selected to 18 All-Star Games. Elected 1991.

Richie Ashburn once likened Steve Carlton to an artist on the mound: "He painted a ballgame. Stroke, stroke, stroke, and when he go through it was a masterpiece." Carlton was an intense competitor with a hard biting slider that was complemented by a great fastball and curve. He ranks second on career lists for wins (329) and strikeouts (4,136) by a left-handed pitcher. In 1972, his first of four Cy Young Award-winning seasons, Carlton led the National League in wins (27), ERA (1.97), inning pitched (346.1) and strikeouts (310) - all for a last-place team that won only 59 games. Elected 1994.

Jocko Conlan became an umpire by accident when Red Ormsby was overcome by the heat while umpiring a 1935 game between the Chicago White Sox and the St. Louis Browns. Conlan, then an outfielder with the White Sox, was asked to fill in. The following year, Conlan launched a new career. A polka-dot tie, balloon chest protector and a quick grin became his trademarks. Conlan won the respect of players and managers alike with his hustle, accuracy and fairness. He umpired in five World Series. Elected 1974.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

Joe Cronin was the first to work his way from the playing field to the league presidency. A lifetime .301 hitter with 515 career doubles, Cronin was selected as an American League All-Star seven times. At age 26, he won the 1933 pennant as a player-manager with Washington Senators before being trade to the Boston Red Sox following the 1934 season, where his roles included player, manager, general manager, treasurer and vice president. He served two terms as AL president, overseeing the league's expansion from eight to twelve teams. Hall of Fames slugger Ted Williams praised his former manager stating, "Whatever I am, I owe to Joe." Elected 1956.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

As famed sportswriter Dan Daniels once wrote, "Bill Dickey isn't just a catcher, he's a ball club." A key performer for the New York Yankees on eight American League pennant-winners and seven World Series champions, the expert handler of pitchers with the deadly accurate throwing arm was also a top hitter, batting better than .300 in 10 of his first 11 full seasons. Know for his durability, he set an AL record by catching a 100 or more games 13 years in a row. Dickey finished his 17-year career with a .313 batting average. Elected 1954.

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.

Don Drysdale teamed with Sandy Koufax during the 1960's to form one of the most dominating pitching duos in history. Utilizing numerous pitches to work both sides of the plate, Drysdale developed a reputation as an intimidator, hitting 154 batters to set a modern National League record. "The trick against Drysdale," said Hall of Game Slugger Orlando Cepeda, "is to hit him before he hits you." A workhorse as well, Drysdale led the NL in games started from 1962 to 1965, and set a record with 58 consecutive scoreless innings in 1968. The two-time 20-game winner won the Cy Young Award in 1962. Elected 1984.

Urban "Red" Faber combined guile and then-legal spitball to win 254 games in a 20-year career, spent entirely with the Chicago White Sox. Faber topped 20 wins four times, despite his White Sox finishing 15 of his 20 seasons in the lower half of the league. Faber turned to the spitter after suffering arm trouble in the minors, but his catcher, Hall of Famer Ray Schalk, said Faber would use the pitch sparingly; "He'd just keep batters guessing." Faber defeated the New York Giants three times in the 1917 World Series, and pitched his best in 1921, when he won 25 games for a seventh-place team. Elected 1964.

Like the original Roy Hobbs, Elmer Flick reported to the Philadelphia Phillies in the spring of 1898 with a bat he had turned on a lathe himself. Described by sportswriter Francis Richter as "one of the most promising youngsters the Phillies had ever had." Flick replaced injured Hall of Famer Sam Thompson in the outfield and remained in the majors for the next 13 seasons. In four full years with the Phillies, Flick hit .338. In nine seasons with the Cleveland Naps, the speedster let the American League in stolen bases twice, triples three times and retired with a .313 lifetime average. Elected 1963.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

Journalist Arthur Baer once noted, "Lefty Grove could throw a lamb past a wolf." Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove, arguably one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all time, was famous for his hard-headed, competitive nature. Connie Mack purchased him from the minor-league Baltimore Orioles for a then-record $100,600 in 1924, and Grimes pitche the Philadelphia Athletics to three straight AL pennants and two World Series titles from 1929 to 1931, going 19-15. He led the league in wins on four occasions, in winning percentage in five seasons, in strikeouts seven consecutive times, and in ERA a staggering nine times. Elected 1947.

A multi-talented right fielder, Vladimir Guerrero combined power and average at the plate with speed on the bases and a terrific throwing arm in the field. A .318 lifetime hitter, Guerrero was a nine-time All-Star who hit 449 home runs over 16 seasons while never striking out more than 95 times in a season. Guerrero began his big league career with the Expos, topping the 40-home run mark in 1999 and 2000 while missing a 40 homer/40 steal season by one home run in 2002. After landing with the Angels via free agency in 2004, Guerrero celebrated his first season in the American League by winning the Most Valuable Player Award. An eight time Silver Slugger Award winner, Guerrero reached the 200-hit plateau four times in his career. Elected 2018

A multi-talented right fielder, Vladimir Guerrero combined power and average at the plate with speed on the bases and a terrific throwing arm in the field. A .318 lifetime hitter, Guerrero was a nine-time All-Star who hit 449 home runs over 16 seasons while never striking out more than 95 times in a season. Guerrero began his big league career with the Expos, topping the 40-home run mark in 1999 and 2000 while missing a 40 homer/40 steal season by one home run in 2002. After landing with the Angels via free agency in 2004, Guerrero celebrated his first season in the American League by winning the Most Valuable Player Award. An eight time Silver Slugger Award winner, Guerrero reached the 200-hit plateau four times in his career. Elected 2018

Jesse Haines was a fixture on the St. Louis Cardinals pitching staff for 18 seasons - the most in club history - earning the nickname "Pop." A hard throwing starter, Haines an unusually fast knuckleball, later becoming a dominant reliever. He pitched for five pennant winners before retiring at age 44. "When I saw how hard a nice old man like "Pop" took losing a game, I realized why he's been a consistent winner." remembered teammate Terry Moore. In game 3 of the 1926 World Series, Haines homered while shutting out the New York Yankees, and then won game 7 to secure the Cardinals first modern championship. Elected 1970.

Charles "Gabby" Hartnett excelled both behind the plate and at the plate, becoming the first backstop in history to slug 200 home runs and drive in 1,000 runs in a career. His catching prowess prompted pitcher Dizzy Dean to proclaim, "If I had that guy to pitch to all the time, I'd never lose a game." Hartnett, who spent 19 seasons with the Chicago Cubs - where he won four pennants - was named to the NL All-Star Game in the first six years the contest was held, starting behind the plate in 1934, 1936 and 1937. he also won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1935. Elected 1955.

Transitioning from a minor league infielder to a hard-throwing reliever, Trevor Hoffman became one of the most consistent pitchers of his era. When a third-career injury robbed him of his explosive fastball, Hoffman re-invented himself again with a knee-buckling changeup that extended his big league stardom. In 18 seasons, Hoffman saved 601 games - becoming the first pitcher to eclipse the 500 - and 600 save plateaus. The seven-time All-Star averaged better than a strikeout per inning, and he reached the 40-save mark nine times in his career. Elected 2018

Transitioning from a minor league infielder to a hard-throwing reliever, Trevor Hoffman became one of the most consistent pitchers of his era. When a third-career injury robbed him of his explosive fastball, Hoffman re-invented himself again with a knee-buckling changeup that extended his big league stardom. In 18 seasons, Hoffman saved 601 games - becoming the first pitcher to eclipse the 500 - and 600 save plateaus. The seven-time All-Star averaged better than a strikeout per inning, and he reached the 40-save mark nine times in his career. Elected 2018

The only man to be part of four World Series champion Boston Red Sox teams (1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918), Harry Hooper played outfield and led off. Babe Ruth once called the "greatest defensive right fielder." Hooper teamed with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis to form one of the finest outfields in major league history. The owner of an engineering degree, Hooper was originally lured to the Red Sox with the ultimately unfulfilled promise that he could help design Fenway Park. After his major league career came to a close, Hooper coached at Princeton University. Elected 1971.

The only man to be part of four World Series champion Boston Red Sox teams (1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918), Harry Hooper played outfield and led off. Babe Ruth once called the "greatest defensive right fielder." Hooper teamed with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis to form one of the finest outfields in major league history. The owner of an engineering degree, Hooper was originally lured to the Red Sox with the ultimately unfulfilled promise that he could help design Fenway Park. After his major league career came to a close, Hooper coached at Princeton University. Elected 1971.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Travis "Stonewall" Jackson was a vital cog in John McGraw's galaxy of stars that constituted the powerful New York Giants teams of the 1920's and early 1930's. The strong-armed infielder was considered "the greatest shortstop ever to play in New York," by legendary columnist Red Smith. An Arkansas native who joined the Giants as a teenager, Jackson eventually became team captain, succeeding Rogers Hornsby, who once praised him by saying, "I never saw him make a mistake."

A switch-hitting third baseman, Chipper Jones was the heart of the Braves lineup during a stretch when Atlanta won 11 consecutive NL East titles, three NL pennants and the 1995 World Series. An eight time All-Star and the 1999 NL MVP, Jones - the No. 1 overall pick in the 1990 MLB draft - drove in 100-or-more runs eight times, totaled 468 home runs and won the 2008 NL batting title with a .364 average. Jones retired as one of only nine players in big league history with at least 400 home runs, a .300 batting average, a .400 on-base percentage and a .500 slugging percentage. Elected 2018.

A switch-hitting third baseman, Chipper Jones was the heart of the Braves lineup during a stretch when Atlanta won 11 consecutive NL East titles, three NL pennants and the 1995 World Series. An eight time All-Star and the 1999 NL MVP, Jones - the No. 1 overall pick in the 1990 MLB draft - drove in 100-or-more runs eight times, totaled 468 home runs and won the 2008 NL batting title with a .364 average. Jones retired as one of only nine players in big league history with at least 400 home runs, a .300 batting average, a .400 on-base percentage and a .500 slugging percentage. Elected 2018.

A feared left-handed slugger, Eddie Mathews became the seventh player in major league history to hit 500 home runs, finishing his career with 512. He walloped more than 30 round-trippers in nine straight seasons. in 1953, his 47 home runs for the Milwaukee Braves led the National League and established a single season record for third baseman that lasted 27 years. Ty Conn once said, "I've known three or four perfect swings in my time. This boy's got one of them." Mathews was a member of two World Series championship teams (1957 and 1968), and in August 1954 was featured on the cover of the inaugural Sports Illustrated. Elected 1978.

Tough and gruff, outfielder Joe Medwick's competitive spirit typified the rowdy "Gashouse Gang" Cardinals of the 1930s. Van Lingle Mungo claimed, "No game is ever won against the Cardinals until Medwick is out in the ninth." "Ducky" batted .300 or better in his first 11 seasons and ended his 17-year career with a .324 batting average. He also collected 1,383 career RBI - topping the National League for three consecutive seasons (1936-1938). In 1937, he won the MVP Award by capturing the Triple Crown and leading the senior circuit in nine other categories. Elected 1968.

Tough and gruff, outfielder Joe Medwick's competitive spirit typified the rowdy "Gashouse Gang" Cardinals of the 1930s. Van Lingle Mungo claimed, "No game is ever won against the Cardinals until Medwick is out in the ninth." "Ducky" batted .300 or better in his first 11 seasons and ended his 17-year career with a .324 batting average. He also collected 1,383 career RBI - topping the National League for three consecutive seasons (1936-1938). In 1937, he won the MVP Award by capturing the Triple Crown and leading the senior circuit in nine other categories. Elected 1968.

The owner of a devastating split-fingered fastball, Jack Morris led his teams to four World Series championships over 18 seasons. Morris, a five-time All-Star, earned 14 straight Opening Day assignments and let the American League in victories twice. The ace of the dominant Tigers teams of the 1980's, he later authored on of the game's signature pitching performances in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series for the Twins, hurling 10 shutout innings and earning the victory in a 1-0 Minnesota triumph - winning the World Series MVP Award. His 162 wins in the 1980's were more than any other pitcher during that decade. Elected 2018.

The owner of a devastating split-fingered fastball, Jack Morris led his teams to four World Series championships over 18 seasons. Morris, a five-time All-Star, earned 14 straight Opening Day assignments and let the American League in victories twice. The ace of the dominant Tigers teams of the 1980's, he later authored on of the game's signature pitching performances in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series for the Twins, hurling 10 shutout innings and earning the victory in a 1-0 Minnesota triumph - winning the World Series MVP Award. His 162 wins in the 1980's were more than any other pitcher during that decade. Elected 2018.

"Here stands baseball's perfect warrior. Here stands baseball's perfect knight," once proclaimed Ford C. Frick of Stan Musial. After 22 years with the St. Louis Cardinals, Musial ranked at or near the top of baseball's all-time lists in nearly every offensive category,. He topped the .300 mark in 17 consecutive seasons and won seven National League batting titles with his famed "corkscrew" stance and ringing line drives. A three-time MVP, "The Man" played in 24 All-Star Games and was a member of three World Series championship teams. In 1948, Musial feel a home run shy of capturing the Triple Crown. In 2011, Musial was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Elected 1969.

On a club full of stars, Atanasio "Tony" Perez Rigal was considered the most clutch hitter for Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s. Longtime opponent Willie Stargell once said, "With men in scoring position, and the game on the line, Tony's the last guy an opponent wanted to see." The Cuba native was a seven-time All-Star selection and ended his 23-year career with 1,652 RBI, 505 doubles and 379 home runs, while helping to propel the Reds to two World Series championships (1975 and 1976). Elected 2000.

From 62nd round draft pick, to Cooperstown, Mike Piazza traveled a road none had taken. By the time he retired, Piazza could lay claim to being one of the greatest hitting catchers in history. Piazza burst on the scene in 1993, winning National League Rookie of the Year honors after hitting .318 with 35 home runs and 112 RBI. Following five stellar seasons with the Dodgers that included two runner-up finishes in the NL MVP Award voting, Piazza was traded to the Marlines and then to the Mets, where he led New York to the 2000 National League pennant. In 16 big league seasons, Piazza hit 427 home runs - including a record 396 as a catcher. He was named to 12 All-Star Games and won 10 Silver Slugger Awards. Elected 2016.

Kirby Puckett was beloved by teammates and opponents alike. A gregarious player with a passion for baseball, Puckett led the Minnesota Twins to two World Series titles with clutch hitting and defense. He was a 10-time All-Star and won six Gold Glove Awards, hitting .318 lifetime. Puckett's 12-year career was prematurely ended due to irreversible retinal damage in his right eye. "In 1991, playing against him in the World Series, if we had to lose and if one person basically was the reason, you don't mind it being Kirby Puckett," Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz said of the Twins' iconic hero. Elected 2001.

Featuring a rarely seen combination of power and speed, Time Raines defined the modern leadoff hitter. Raines stole at ;east 70 bases in each of his first six big league seasons, winning the 1986 NL batting title along the way. With a .385 career on-base percentage, Raines kept the pressure on opponents by succeeding in 84.7 percent of his stolen base attempts - the top figure of any player with at least 400 steals. In each of four seasons from 1983-86, Raines stole at least 70 bases, totaled at least 50 extra base hits and posted an on-base percentage of .390 or better - exactly half of the eight seasons like that in baseball history. A seven-time All-Star, Raines finished his career with 808 steals, fifth most of all-time. Elected 2017.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed "Pudge" and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times. Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles - the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year's MVP Award. Elected 2017.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed "Pudge" and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times. Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles - the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year's MVP Award. Elected 2017.

A symbol of durability and toughness, diminutive Ray Schalk was a defensive standout and an innovator at his position. Schalk is credited as one of the first catchers to back up plays at first and third base, and continuously caught 100-or-more games per season. A skilled receiver, he caught the 1920 Chicago White Sox staff, which featured four 20-game winners. He also was the first backstop to catch four no-hitters. Schalk retired after 18 seasons as owner of a slew of defensive records. He went on to manage, coach and scout for numerous professional and amateur baseball teams. Elected 1955.

The architect of state-of-the-art teams in both Kansas City and Atlanta, John Schuerholz switched careers in his mid-20s - going from middle school teacher to front office executive. After learning on the job with the Orioles in the late 1960s, Schuerholz joined the expansion Royals and helped lay the groundwork for one of the most consistent teams of the late 1970s and early '80s. He became the youngest general manager in baseball in 1981 with the Royals, fine-tuning the roster into the club that would win the 1985 World Series. Moving to Atlanta in 1990, Schuerholz quickly turned the Braves into a National League powerhouse, and from 1991-99 won five NL pennants and the 1995 World Series - making him the first GM in history to capture World Series titles in both leagues. Leading the Braves to 14 straight postseason appearances from 1991-2005, Schuerholz established himself as one of the game's top talent evaluators. Elected 2017.

Over 23 years as MLB's commissioner, Alan H. "Bud" Selig guided baseball through some of the most significant changes in the game's history. As the owner of the Milwaukee Brewers throughout the 1970s and 80s, Selig became one of baseball's leading voices. He took over as acting commissioner in 1992 and then accepted the permanent position in 1998, serving more seasons as the MLB's leader as anyone except Kennesaw Mountain Landis. Under Selig, MLB enjoyed 20-plus years of labor peace following the 1994-95 strike and experienced a ballpark boom that featured almost two dozen new stadiums. Selig retired Jackie Robinson's No. 42 throughout baseball in 1997, oversaw MLB's expansion into three divisions per league along with the Postseason addition of Wild Cards, and helped establish the toughest anti-drug measures in all of sport. Elected 2017.

Sportswriter Bob Broeg regarded Joe Sewell as "a maestro with the bat." One of three brothers to play major league ball, Sewell was the toughest batter to strike out in major league history, fanning just 114 times in 7,132 at-bats. A graduate of the University of Alabama, Sewell made his major league debut during the Cleveland Indians' pennant drive in 1920 - after playing fewer than 100 professional games. Sewell would coach the New York Yankees and scout for the New York Mets and Cleveland Indians before becoming a public relations practitioner for a dairy farm - and later managed his alma mater's baseball program. Elected 1977.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

Casey Stengel's remarkable career included 14 years playing the outfield and 25 years managing in the major leagues. Always colorful and wildly popular, Stengel reached unparalleled success with the New York Yankees, winning 10 pennants and seven World Series from 1949 to 1960. An astute judge of talent who often platooned players and juggled his pitchers, he was equally admired for "Stengelese," his own brand of double-talk, which made him one of the most quoted people in baseball history. "The Yankees don't pay me to win every day - just two out of three," he once declared. Elected 1966.

Casey Stengel's remarkable career included 14 years playing the outfield and 25 years managing in the major leagues. Always colorful and wildly popular, Stengel reached unparalleled success with the New York Yankees, winning 10 pennants and seven World Series from 1949 to 1960. An astute judge of talent who often platooned players and juggled his pitchers, he was equally admired for "Stengelese," his own brand of double-talk, which made him one of the most quoted people in baseball history. "The Yankees don't pay me to win every day - just two out of three," he once declared. Elected 1966.

Bill Terry referred to hitting as a business. With a lifetime .341 batting average - a modern National League record for left-handed batters - his business was a resounding success. The last player in the NL to top .400, Terry socked 254 hits in 1930, when he hit .401. An excellent fielder and team leader, he succeeded John McGraw as the New York Giants manager in 1932 and won three pennants and a World Series championship in the next six years. Elected 1954.

Jim Thome combined massive power with a smooth batting stroke and a keen eye to total 612 home runs over 22 big league seasons. A third baseman when he debuted with the Indians, Thome moved across the diamond early in his career and become one of the most productive first basemen of his era. A five-time All-Star, Thome reached the 30-homer mark 12 times and led his league in walks three times. He hit 17 Postseason home runs over 71 games, including four home runs apiece in both the 1998 ALCS and the 1999 ALDS. Elected 2018.

Jim Thome combined massive power with a smooth batting stroke and a keen eye to total 612 home runs over 22 big league seasons. A third baseman when he debuted with the Indians, Thome moved across the diamond early in his career and become one of the most productive first basemen of his era. A five-time All-Star, Thome reached the 30-homer mark 12 times and led his league in walks three times. He hit 17 Postseason home runs over 71 games, including four home runs apiece in both the 1998 ALCS and the 1999 ALDS. Elected 2018.

A durable all-around shortstop, Alan Trammell anchored the Tigers infield for 20 seasons, earning six All-Star Game selections, four Gold Glove Awards and three Silver Slugger Awards along the way. A .285 lifetime hitter, Trammell added power to his game as his career progressed and worked his way into Detroit's cleanup role in the lineup by 1987, a rarity for a shortstop of his era. He batted .450 with two home runs and six RBI in the Tigers' five-game World Series victor over the Padres in 1984, earning MVP honors. Elected 2018.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

Once described as, "170 pounds of scrap-iron, rawhide and guts," Zachariah Davis Wheat, was a model of consistency during a 19-year career, spent mostly with Brooklyn of the National League. Wheat's soft spoken demeanor belied a competitive fierceness on the diamond. Considered an intelligent ballplayer with impressive defensive skills, Wheat vexed his opponents with line-drive hitting, which netted 2,884 career hits. Beloved by the fans in Brooklyn, Wheat was remembered by Casey Stengel as "the only great ballplayer who was never booed." Elected 1959.

After earning a Purple Heart while serving in WWII, James Hoyt Wilhelm made it to the major leagues in 1952, at age 29. Wilhelm developed his reputation as the master of the knuckleball - a pitch he used effectively in more than 1,000 relief appearance's. "It takes no effort at all to pitch a knuckleball," Wilhelm said. "No windup is necessary . It's so simple that that very little warm-up in the bullpen is necessary." Wilhelm won 143 games, including a record 124 out of the bullpen, and no-hit the New York Yankees in a 1958 start. Elected 1985.

"If I had all the men I ever handled and they were in their prime, and there was one game I wanted to win above all others, Albert would be my man," said Connie Mack of Chief Bender. A stalwart of Mack's great Philadelphia Athletics teams of the 1910's, Charles Albert "Chief" Bender led the club to five AL pennants and World Series wins in 1910, 1911 and 1913. A two time 20-game winner his best season was 1910, when he went 23-5 with a 1.58 ERA. Bender a lifetime record of 212-127 with a 2.46 ERA in 16 seasons. Elected 1953.

Dubbed "Home Run" by Hall of Famer Josh Gibson, Willard Brown regularly batted better than .300, helping the Kansas City Monarchs win six pennant from 1937 to 1946. The slugging outfield played in eight East-West All-Star games, lost tow years to World War II Army service and briefly played wit the St. Louis Browns in the majors leagues in 1947. A star in the Puerto Rico Winter League during the 1940s and 1950s, Brown captured two Triple Crowns there, twice tipping .400 and earning the nickname "Ese Hombre" (That Man). He finished his career with five minor league seasons, notably bashed 35 home runs in the Texas League in 1954. Elected 2006.

Nicknamed "Crab" due to his sometimes cantankerous demeanor, Jesse Burkett compiled a .338 lifetime average, topping the .400 mark in 1895 and 1896. In nice consecutive years (1893-1901), he never batted below .341. Playing in more than 2,000 games during a career that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries, Burkett had 200-or-more hits in six different seasons, totaling 2,850, second only to Cap Anson during that era. An adept bunter, Burkett claimed he could have bunted for a .400 average following the rules of 19th century baseball. Elected 1946.

Considered the model umpire of the post-war era, Nestor Chylak was a skillful arbiter who earned the respect of players and managers alike during his 25-year major league career. The longtime American League crew chief worked five All-Star Games, three League Championship Series and five World Series. During service in the U.S. Army in World War II, he nearly lost his eyesight in the Battle of the Bulge after being struck by shrapnel from an exploding shell. His courage merited the prestigious Silver Star and Purple Heart. Elected 1999.

"Leon Day was as good as Satchel Paige, as good as any pitcher who ever lived," teammate Monte Irvin once noted. With his blazing fastball, snapping curve and no-windup delivery, Day baffled Negro League hitters throughout the 1930's and 1940's. Equally feared as a batsman, he often would play second base or the outfield when not pitching. Day spent two years pitching on integrated Army teams during World War II, and in his first game back with the Newark Eagles in 1946, he tossed a no-hitter against the Philadelphia Stars. Elected 1995.

Athletic and educated, Billy Evans was only 22 when he joined the American League umpiring crew in 1906, becoming the youngest major league umpire in history. Working six World Series during a 22-year career, Evans was lauded for fairness and superior integrity. Evans once said, "The umpire must be firm and insistent in his dignity but must not be officious." Besides being an umpire, Evans was an accomplished sportswriter. He later served as a front office executive for the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers. Elected 1973.

Wesley Cheek "Wes" Ferrell (February 2, 1908 – December 9, 1976) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball from 1927 through 1941. Primarily a starting pitcher, Ferrell played for the Cleveland Indians (1927–33), Boston Red Sox (1934–37), Washington Senators (1937–38), New York Yankees (1938–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940) and Boston Braves (1941). He batted and threw right-handed. Ferrell's 37 home runs as a batter remain a career record for a MLB pitcher.

"Baseball must always keep pace with the times," Warren Giles said upon his retirement after 18 years as National League president. Although he respected tradition, Giles refused to be bound by old practices. In his tenure from 1951 to 1969, he oversaw one of the most significant and dynamic eras in league history, addressing franchise relocation, expansion and the construction of new stadiums. Giles began his 51-year baseball career in 1919 as a minor league club president and ran the Cincinnati Reds from 1937 to 1951, a profitable tenure that included pennants in 1939 and 1940. Elected 1979.

A strong left-handed clutch hitter with a keen eye, Leon "Goose" Goslin logged 11 seasons with a .300 or better batting average - and just as many with at least 100 RBI. Goslin's bat helped lead his teams to five American League pennants, including a victory in the 1924 World Series with the Washington Senators, and he contributed a series-clinching hit for the 1935 Detroit Tigers. The carefree outfielder was just happy to play baseball: "They didn't have to pay me," he theorized after his career, "I'd have paid them to let me play. Listen the truth is it was more than fun, it was heaven." Elected 1968.

Oral Clyde Hildebrand (April 7, 1907 – September 8, 1977) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1931 to 1940. He played for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, and New York Yankees. Hildebrand started his professional baseball career in 1930 with the American Association's Indianapolis Indians. In two seasons, he went just 14–18[5] but made it to the major leagues in late 1931. Hildebrand broke into the Cleveland Indians' starting rotation in 1933. That season, he went 16–11, led the American League in shutouts with six, and was selected to the All-Star team. He pitched a one-hitter on April 26. From 1934 to 1936, he continued to pitch effectively for the Indians, going 30–28 in those years. Hildebrand also had several public disputes with manager Walter Johnson, which ended when Johnson was fired in 1935. In 1937, Hildebrand was traded to the Browns in a blockbuster deal. He struggled in two seasons with St. Louis and was then traded again, to the Yankees. In 1939, he went 10–4 with a career-low 3.06 earned run average, helping the Yankees win the AL pennant. He started game 4 of the World Series and pitched four shutout innings, as the Yankees clinched the title. Hildebrand went back to the minor leagues in 1941[5] and retired the following year.

David Jolly (October 14, 1924 – May 27, 1963) was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher. The 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 165 lb (75 kg) right-hander was a native of Stony Point, North Carolina. He was signed by the St. Louis Browns as an amateur free agent before the 1946 season. After pitching in the Browns, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Yankees organizations, he was drafted by the Boston Braves from the Yankees in the 1952 rule V draft (December 1). He played for the Milwaukee Braves from 1953 to 1957 and was a member of the 1957 World Series championship team. Jolly made his major league debut in relief on May 9, 1953, against the Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee County Stadium. From 1953 to 1957, the first five years that the Braves were in Milwaukee, he was second on the pitching staff with 158 relief appearances, an average of almost 32 per season. During those seasons the closer's job was held at different times by Lew Burdette, Ernie Johnson, Jolly, and Don McMahon. Jolly's best season was 1954, when he was 11–6 with 10 saves and a 2.43 earned run average in 47 games. He finished in the National League Top Ten for winning percentage, games pitched, games finished, and saves. Career totals for 160 games (159 as a pitcher) include a record of 16–14, 1 game started, 0 complete games, 82 games finished, 19 saves, and an ERA of 3.77. He wielded a strong bat for a pitcher, going 14-for-48 (.292) with 1 home run, 7 runs batted in, and 8 runs scored. On October 15, 1957, Jolly was purchased from the Braves by the San Francisco Giants, but never again pitched in a big league game. Jolly died in 1963 at the age of 38 in Durham, North Carolina, one year after he underwent surgery for a brain tumor.

Vernal Leroy "Nippy" Jones (June 29, 1925 – October 3, 1995) was an American professional baseball first baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three National League clubs during the 1940s and 1950s, and won World Series rings with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946 and the Milwaukee Braves in 1957. Jones was born in Los Angeles, and signed with the Cardinals upon graduation from John C. Fremont High School in Inglewood, California, in 1943. After batting .304 for the Cardinals' Pacific Coast League affiliate Sacramento Solons in 1943, Jones left baseball for two years in order to serve in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He returned in 1946, spending most of the season with the Cardinals' triple A affiliate Rochester Red Wings. However, he did appear in sixteen games with the Cardinals, and was on their post-season roster. He struck out in his only plate appearance of the 1946 World Series against the Boston Red Sox in game five. He split 1947 between St. Louis and Rochester before earning a starting job with the Cards in 1948. Having originally come up with the Cardinals as a second baseman, he played first base for the 1948 Cardinals, with future Hall of Famer Stan Musial shifting to the outfield. He batted .254 with ten home runs and 81 runs batted in in his first full season for the second place Cardinals. The highlight of his season occurred on July 26, when he hit a walk off home run in the eleventh inning to lift the Braves to a 6–3 victory over the New York Giants.[2] After finishing second to the Brooklyn Dodgers two years in a row, the Braves won the National League in 1957, and faced the New York Yankees in the World Series. Jones is remembered for being involved in a controversial "shoe polish incident" in the 1957 Fall Classic. He pinch hit in Games 1 and 3, grounding out both times. Both of those games were won by the Yankees. Game 4 went into extra innings, and when the Yankees took a 5–4 lead in the tenth, the Braves were looking at the possibility of falling three games to one in the series. Jones led off the Milwaukee half of the tenth inning, pinch hitting for Warren Spahn. He jumped back from a low pitch that home plate umpire Augie Donatelli called a ball. Jones protested that it had hit his foot, and he was awarded first base after showing Donatelli a shoe polish mark on the ball to prove it. Yankees manager Casey Stengel vehemently protested the call, but to no avail. The Braves scored three runs in the tenth, including a two-run home run by Eddie Mathews to end the game and even the series at two games apiece. The play was the turning point in the series, as the Braves went on to win the series in seven games. A similar incident would be repeated twelve years later by Cleon Jones of the New York Mets in Game 5 of the 1969 World Series.

Theodore Bernard "Big Klu" Kluszewski was a professional baseball player from 1947 through 1961. He spent most of his 15-year Major League Baseball career playing for the Cincinnati Reds as a first baseman. Kluszewski was a NL All-Star for four seasons. He had a .298 lifetime batting average, hitting over .290 three times and over .300 seven times. In 1954, he was the NL MVP runner-up (he had a .326 batting average), led the NL in home runs (49), RBI (141), and fielding average (.996). In 1959, Kluszewski was traded late in the season to the Chicago White Sox from the Pittsburgh Pirates. He batted .297 and did not commit any errors in 31 games for Chicago which helped the "Go-Go" White Sox of the 1950s clinch the AL pennant. In 1962, he was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame.

Theodore Bernard "Big Klu" Kluszewski was a professional baseball player from 1947 through 1961. He spent most of his 15-year Major League Baseball career playing for the Cincinnati Reds as a first baseman. Kluszewski was a NL All-Star for four seasons. He had a .298 lifetime batting average, hitting over .290 three times and over .300 seven times. In 1954, he was the NL MVP runner-up (he had a .326 batting average), led the NL in home runs (49), RBI (141), and fielding average (.996). In 1959, Kluszewski was traded late in the season to the Chicago White Sox from the Pittsburgh Pirates. He batted .297 and did not commit any errors in 31 games for Chicago which helped the "Go-Go" White Sox of the 1950s clinch the AL pennant. In 1962, he was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame.

A lawyer by trade, Bowie Kuhn's baseball odyssey went from working the scoreboard at Washington's Griffith Stadium to becoming Major League Baseball's fifth commissioner in 1969. During his 15-year tenure, baseball experienced dramatic increases in attendance, salaries, revenue and franchise values. While steering the game through labor strife and the establishment of free agency, Kuhn introduced night games to the World Series, expanded television coverage and oversaw the introduction of divisional ply in each league as well as MLB's expansion into Canada. Elected 2008.

Maris would hold the single-season home run record from 1961 to 1996 when the steroid era came into play. Many believe Maris' record is still them record!

Donald John McMahon (January 4, 1930 – July 22, 1987) was a right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he was signed by the Boston Braves before the 1950 season. He played for the Milwaukee Braves (1957–62), Houston Colt .45s (1962–63), Cleveland Indians (1964–66), Boston Red Sox (1966–67), Chicago White Sox (1967–68), Detroit Tigers (1968–69), and San Francisco Giants (1969–74). McMahon was used almost exclusively in relief during his 18-year MLB career. He appeared in 874 games, just two as a starter, and was one of the major leagues' busiest and most dependable relievers during his era. He never once spent time on the disabled list, and in the fifteen full seasons that he played (1958–72), he averaged about 54 games and 81 innings pitched per year. He reached the big leagues at the advanced age of 27 after playing minor league ball for about 5½ years and also spending two years in the military (May 30, 1951 – May 17, 1953). He appeared in his final game on June 29, 1974, nearly 17 years after his major league debut. McMahon was a valuable part of two World Championship clubs—the 1957 Milwaukee Braves and the 1968 Detroit Tigers. He posted a 1.54 ERA with 9 saves in 32 games for the 1957 Braves, and a 2.02 ERA with a 3–1 record in 20 games for the 1968 Tigers after a mid-season trade from the White Sox. All together he pitched in three World Series and one National League Championship Series. He finished in the American League or National League top ten seven times for games pitched, seven times for saves, eight times for games finished, and once each for wild pitches, hit batsmen, and winning percentage. He recorded his 1000th strikeout at the age of 44 on May 27, 1974 on All-Star shortstop Don Kessinger of the Chicago Cubs. A little more than a month later, when McMahon retired, only Hoyt Wilhelm, Lindy McDaniel, and Cy Young had pitched in more games. For his career he finished with a lifetime record of 90–68, 153 saves, 506 games finished, and an earned run average of 2.96. As of the conclusion of the 2006 season, McMahon ranked 17th all-time for fewest hits allowed per 9 innings pitched (7.24).

Robert William Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American baseball left and right fielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for eleven seasons from 1920 through 1930, all but the last for the New York Yankees. He was best known as a member of the Yankees' championship teams of the 1920s, nicknamed the "Murderers' Row", during which time the team won its first six American League (AL) pennants and first three World Series titles. Meusel, noted for his strong outfield throwing arm, batted fifth behind Baseball Hall of Famers Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. In 1925, he became the second Yankee, after Ruth, to lead the AL in the following offensive categories: home runs (33), runs batted in (138) and extra base hits (79). Nicknamed "Long Bob" because of his 6-foot, 3 inch (1.91 m) stature, Meusel batted .313 or better in seven of his first eight seasons, finishing with a .309 career average; his 1,005 RBI during the 1920s were the fourth most by any major leaguer, and trailed only Harry Heilmann's total of 1,131 among AL right-handed hitters. Meusel ended his career in 1930 with the Cincinnati Reds. He hit for the cycle three times, and was the second of four major leaguers to accomplish this feat as many as three times during a career. His older brother, Emil "Irish" Meusel, was a star outfielder in the National League (NL) during the same period, primarily for the New York Giants.

Daniel Francis O'Connell (January 21, 1927 – October 2, 1969) was an American infielder in Major League Baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1950; 1953), Milwaukee Braves (1954–57), New York/San Francisco Giants (1957–59) and Washington Senators (1961–62). During his MLB career, he was listed at 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 168 pounds (76 kg). He threw and batted right-handed. As a member of the San Francisco Giants, O'Connell scored the first run in the first big-league baseball game played on the West Coast on April 15, 1958. After drawing a base on balls against Don Drysdale of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the third inning, he advanced to third base on another walk and a single before scoring on a sacrifice fly by Jim Davenport. The Giants won, 8–0. O'Connell was a native of Paterson, New Jersey. He initially signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers and played four years in their farm system. He was sold to the Pirates after the 1949 season while still a minor leaguer, and called up in mid-July 1950. He proceeded to hit .292 (1950) and .294 (1953) in consecutive seasons bracketed by United States Army service during the Korean War (1951–52). O'Connell finished third in voting for the 1950 National League Rookie of the Year and 16th in voting for the 1953 NL Most Valuable Player. O'Connell lost his regular job in 1959, and then returned to Triple-A for all of 1960 before drawing his unconditional release. Signed as a free agent by the 1961–71 edition of the Senators, just created as an expansion team, he played in that franchise's first regular season game, on April 10, 1961 at Griffith Stadium in the traditional Presidential opener. He went two for four, but Washington lost to the Chicago White Sox, 4–3.) 0 'Connell split the year between second and third base, starting 132 games. He led the Senators in base hits (128) and the American League in sacrifice hits (15) in 1961. After playing a reduced role for the 1962 Senators, O'Connell became the player-manager of the York White Roses, Washington's Double-A farm team, in 1963. But on May 22, he was recalled to Washington to serve as the Senators' first-base coach. He held that job for the rest of 1963 and all of 1964 before leaving baseball. In ten seasons in the Majors, O'Connell played in 1,143 games and had 4,035 at bats, 527 runs scored, 1,049 hits, 181 doubles, 35 triples, 39 home runs, 320 runs batted in, 48 stolen bases, 431 walks, .260 batting average, .333 on-base percentage, .351 slugging percentage, 1,417 total bases and 89 sacrifice hits. O'Connell, who was residing in Bloomfield, New Jersey, died October 2, 1969, in nearby Clifton at the age of 42 from a heart attack while driving his Ford which then crashed into a utility pole. He left his wife, Vera, and four children, Maureen, Danny Jr., Nancy and John. He was buried at Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Montclair.

Phillips Steere Paine (June 8, 1930 – February 19, 1978) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched all or part of six seasons between 1951 and 1958. In 1953, while serving in the military, Paine pitched in nine games for the Nishitetsu Lions, becoming the first former major leaguer to play in Nippon Professional Baseball. Paine made his NPB debut for the Lions on August 23, 1953. On February 19, 1978, Paine died at the Veterans Hospital near Lebanon, Pennsylvania of a brain tumor.

Billy Southworth spent 13 seasons as an outfielder and another 13 as a manager in the National League. Highly respected by his players, Southworth skippered the St. Louis Cardinals for seven seasons, averaging 101 wins a season between 1941 and 1945. he won three pennants with the Redbirds, along with World Series titles in 1942 and 1944. During his six year stint as manager of the Boston Braves, Southworth brought the perennial league doormats their first pennant in 34 years, accomplishing the feat in 1948. Southworth finished with a 1,044 -704 record, giving him the fifth-best winning percentage (.597) of all time. Elected 2008.

Melvin Leon Stottlemyre Sr. (November 13, 1941 – January 13, 2019) was an American professional baseball pitcher and pitching coach. He played for 11 seasons in Major League Baseball, all for the New York Yankees, and coached for 23 seasons, for the Yankees, New York Mets, Houston Astros, and Seattle Mariners. He was a five-time MLB All-Star as a player and a five-time World Series champion as a coach. Stottlemyre was named to the American League's (AL) roster for the 1965 Major League Baseball (MLB) All-Star Game, though he did not appear in the game.[4] He won 20 games in the 1965 season, and led the AL with 18 complete games, 291 innings pitched, and 1,188 batters faced. He appeared in the 1966 MLB All-Star Game. He led the league with 20 losses.[8] Stottlemyre won 20 games in the 1968 and 1969 seasons. He also started the 1969 MLB All-Star Game. Stottlemyre threw 40 shutouts in his 11-season career, the same number as Hall of Fame lefty Sandy Koufax, which ties for 44th best all-time. Eighteen of those shutouts came in a three-season span from 1971–73. The Yankees released Stottlemyre before the 1975 season. Stottlemyre retired with 164 career wins and a 2.97 ERA. Known as a solid-hitting pitcher, on July 20, 1965, Stottlemyre hit a rare inside-the-park grand slam. On September 26, 1964, he recorded five base hits in five at bats.

According to legend, New York Giants manager John McGraw received a flippant scouting report on Paul Waner: "That little punk don't even know how to put on a uniform," Upon seeing Waner play, McGraw fired the scout. "That little punt don't know how to put on a uniform, but he's removed three of my pitchers with line drives this week," McGraw roared. Waner began his baseball career as a pitcher, but his hitting prowess assured that "Big Poison" would play every day. During a 20-year career, Waner accumulated 3,152 hits, batted .333, won three National League batting championships and garnered the 1927 MVP Award. Elected 1952.

Lonnie Warneke (March 28, 1909 – June 23, 1976) (nicknamed "The Arkansas Hummingbird", was a Major League Baseball player, Major League umpire, county judge, and businessman from Montgomery County, Arkansas, whose career won-loss record as a pitcher for the Chicago Cubs (1930–36, 1942–43, 1945) and St. Louis Cardinals (1937–42) was 192–121. Warneke pitched for the National League in the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game in 1933, hitting the first triple and scoring the first National League run in All-Star game history. He pitched in two other All-Star Games (1934, 1936) and was also selected in 1939 and 1941. Warneke pitched in two World Series for the Cubs (1932, 1935), compiling a record of 2–1, with a 2.63 earned run average (ERA). He pitched a no-hitter for the Cardinals on August 30, 1941; opened the 1934 season with back to back one-hitters (April 17 and 22); and set a Major League Baseball fielding record for pitchers (since eclipsed) of 227 consecutive chances without an error, covering 163 games. After retiring as a player in 1945, Warneke was an umpire, Warneke is the only person who has both played and umpired in both an All-Star Game and a World Series.

A superb all-around Negro Leagues player, Willie Wells forged his reputation as one of the best shortstops in baseball by utilizing his great range, sure hands and quick release. He was a defensive stalwart on several team in the Negro and Mexican Leagues - where his aggressive play earned him the nickname "El Diablo" (The Devil). "[Wells] always came up with the big play," said Hall of Famer Monte Irvin. "The opposition would say, Don't hit it to shortstop because "The Devil" is playing out there." Wells later gained renown as a leader and teacher, serving as player-manager with the Newark Eagles. Elected 1997.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

A major figure in 19th century baseball, the strong willed Adrian Constantine "Cap" Anson played five seasons in the National Association and 22 in the National League, mainly at first base with Chicago. He batted better than .300 during 24 of those seasons and was the first player to accumulate more than 3,000 hits. He served as player-manager for Chicago, earning more than 1,200 wins and capturing five NL pennants in a seven year stretch from 1880 to 1886. Elected 1939.

A major figure in 19th century baseball, the strong willed Adrian Constantine "Cap" Anson played five seasons in the National Association and 22 in the National League, mainly at first base with Chicago. He batted better than .300 during 24 of those seasons and was the first player to accumulate more than 3,000 hits. He served as player-manager for Chicago, earning more than 1,200 wins and capturing five NL pennants in a seven year stretch from 1880 to 1886. Elected 1939.

A major figure in 19th century baseball, the strong willed Adrian Constantine "Cap" Anson played five seasons in the National Association and 22 in the National League, mainly at first base with Chicago. He batted better than .300 during 24 of those seasons and was the first player to accumulate more than 3,000 hits. He served as player-manager for Chicago, earning more than 1,200 wins and capturing five NL pennants in a seven year stretch from 1880 to 1886. Elected 1939.

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Morris "Moe" Berg was an American catcher and coach in Major League Baseball who later served as a spy for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Although he played 15 seasons in the major leagues, almost entirely for four American League teams, Berg was never more than an average player, usually used as a backup catcher, and was better known for being the "brainiest guy in baseball" than for anything he accomplished in the game. Casey Stengel once described Berg as "the strangest man ever to play baseball."

Charles Comiskey experienced success as a player, manager and owner for a half century. In 1883 - at the age of 23 - he became player-manager of the American Association's St. Louis Browns, leading them to four consecutive pennants from 1885 to 1888. He was one of the founders of the upstart American League in 1901 and owned the Chicago White Sox for 31 years, winning four pennants. In 1910, he built famed Comiskey Park, an impressive steel structure that lasted 80 years. Elected 1939.

One of the game's smartest and scrappiest players, Johnny Evers bridged Tinker and Chance in the famed Chicago Cubs infield for eight seasons. Known as "The Human Crab" for the way he approached ground balls (along with his temperament), Boston Braves teammate Rabbit Maranville once said, "He'd make you want to punch him, but you knew Johnny was thinking only of the team." He led the Cubs to two World Series championships; later he took the 1914 "Miracle Braves" from last place in July to a championship in October. Elected 1946.

Ford Frick worked as a sportswriter and broadcaster before becoming the National League president in 1934. As president, he provided the official support necessary to establish the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. When opposition arose to Jackie Robinson playing in the majors in 1947, Frick warned potential strikers that they would "be barred from baseball even though it means the disruption of a club or a whole league." Frick became Commissioner in 1951, serving in that post for 14 seasons and overseeing relocations, expansion and the transition from radio to television, which broadened coverage of the game. Elected 1970.

Leading the Detroit Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants, Hughie Jennings was no stranger to success. As a shortstop with a propensity to for being hit by pitched balls, the freckle-faced redhead helped the Baltimore Orioles to three straight National League pennants and four trips to the Temple Cup, (precursor to the World Series) during the 1890's. The man from Pennsylvania coal country was noted for the perpetual grin on his face that umpire Tim Hurst claimed "echoes." Elected 1945.

Kenesaw Mountain Landis was appointed as baseball's first commissioner on Nov. 12, 1920. A strict disciplinarian, Landis helped restore the public confidence baseball following the scandal of the 1919 "Black Sox." The former U.S. District judge banned eight Chicago White Sox players for life, despite their acquittal in a court of law. Landis oft utilized the "absolute power" granted by the owners to ensure the games integrity. Elected 1944.

Leland Stanford "Larry" MacPhail was one of baseball's great innovators, introducing night baseball to the major leagues, along with airplane travel and regular broadcast coverage of his team's games. MacPhail also initiated pension plans and helped develop and promote the use of protective batting helmets. He laid the foundation for a Cincinnati Reds World Series championship squad before taking the reins of the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees. Elected 1978.

Bill McGowan was an exception to the old adage that fans don't pay to see the umpire. He introduced a colorful umpiring style with aggressive body gestures bordered on the pugnacious, Yet McGowan ejected very few players. His enthusiasm never waned over 30 American League seasons, while his hustle and skill commanded the players respect. In 1933, McGowan selected to be a member of the umpiring crew that worked the initial All-Star Game. He was an iron man among umpires - not missing an inning for 16 years, spanning 2,541 consecutive games. Elected 1992.

The son of Cuban immigrants, Alejandro "Alex" Pompez owned the Cuban Stars of the Eastern "Colored" League and, later, the New York Cubans of the Negro National League. Following the demise of the Negro Leagues, Pompez was a scout for the New York and San Francisco Giants for 25 years, working to enable Caribbean players to enter the major leagues. He helped sign stars such as Orlando Cepeda, Juan Marichal and the Alou brothers. With his expertise on African-American baseball history, he was asked to serve on the Hall of Fame's Committee on Negro Leagues in 1971. Elected 2006.

After serving 13 years in the minor leagues, George Weiss moved into the New York Yankees front office in 1932 and remained active in the game until 1971. Noted for developing a wide-ranging farm system that produced the talent driving the Yankees' dominance, Weiss' clubs captured 19 American League pennants and 15 World Series titles from 1932 to 1960. Weiss was considered an astute evaluator of talent - a rival executive once bemoaned, "I never made a single deal with him. He was too smart. Elected 1971.

After purchasing the struggling Boston Red Sox in 1933, Thomas, Austin Yawkey dedicated the next 43 years to building a model franchise, capturing American League pennants in 1946, 1967 and 1975. A popular leader in Boston, Yawkey was a generous man, beloved by his players and the fans, and was a leader among big league owners. Ted Williams once said, "[Yawkey] had a heart as big as a watermelon. I loved the man from the bottom of my heart. He was unselfish, fair, sincere and honest." Yawkey himself once said, "I was always taught to help others; that those of us fortunate enough to be born with material abundance should do what we can for those who are not. I do what I can." Elected 1980.

Clarence Arthur "Dazzy" Vance toiled in the minor leagues for a decade and didn't win a game in the majors until he was 31 years old. The most dominant pitcher of the 1920s, Vance used his blazing fastball to lead the National League in strikeouts for seven consecutive seasons. Teammate Johnny Frederick said that Vance "could throw a crème puff through a battleship." His 1924 season=, for which he won the MVP Award, featured the pitching Triple Crown; he led the league with a 28-6 record, 2.16 ERA and 262 strikeouts. Elected 1955.

Clarence Arthur "Dazzy" Vance toiled in the minor leagues for a decade and didn't win a game in the majors until he was 31 years old. The most dominant pitcher of the 1920s, Vance used his blazing fastball to lead the National League in strikeouts for seven consecutive seasons. Teammate Johnny Frederick said that Vance "could throw a crème puff through a battleship." His 1924 season=, for which he won the MVP Award, featured the pitching Triple Crown; he led the league with a 28-6 record, 2.16 ERA and 262 strikeouts. Elected 1955.

A product of the Pennsylvania coal mines, Stan Coveleski learned control as a youngster by throwing rocks at the cans that swung from a tree. From the sandlot to a shutout in his first big league start with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912, Coveleski totaled five 20-win seasons with the Cleveland Indians and Washington Senators and 215 career victories. A spitball crafted in the minor leagues keyed his success for 14 seasons, during which he twice paced the league in ERA. Coveleski emerged as the hero of the 1920 World Series, with three complete game-wins for the Indians vs. Brooklyn, yielding only two runs. Elected 1969.

An overpowering left-hander, Sandy Koufax enjoyed a six-year stretch as perhaps the most dominating pitcher in the game's history. Koufax captured five straight ERA titles and set a modern record with 382 strikeouts in 1965. His fastball and devastating curve enabled him to pitch no-hitters in four consecutive seasons, including a perfect game in 1965. He posted a 0.95 ERA in four World Series, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers to three championships. Hall of Fame slugger Willie Stargell once said: "Trying to hit (Koufax) was like trying to drink coffee with a fork." Elected 1972.

Charles Herbert "Red" Ruffing anchored six New York Yankees World Series championship teams in the 1930s and early 1940s. He was a player who teammate and Hall of Fame catcher, Bill Dickey described as "the best pitcher (I) ever caught." Though Ruffing lost four toes on his left foot in a mining accident as a teenager, he successfully transitioned from outfielder to pitcher. A veteran of World War II, Ruffing continued his baseball career as a manager, coach and scout for a multitude of teams in organized baseball. Elected 1967.

Ed Barrow was an excellent judge of baseball talent and responsible for the creation of the games greatest dynasty, the New York Yankees. The team's chief executive used wise trades, outright player purchases and a budding farm system to put together teams that won 14 pennants and 10 World Series championships - including five series sweeps - between 1921 and 1945. Elected 1953

Ed Barrow was an excellent judge of baseball talent and responsible for the creation of the games greatest dynasty, the New York Yankees. The team's chief executive used wise trades, outright player purchases and a budding farm system to put together teams that won 14 pennants and 10 World Series championships - including five series sweeps - between 1921 and 1945. Elected 1953

Albert Walter "Sparky" Lyle (born July 22, 1944) is an American former left-handed relief pitcher who spent sixteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1967 through 1982. He was a relief pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Texas Rangers, Philadelphia Phillies, and Chicago White Sox. A three-time All-Star, he won the American League (AL) Cy Young Award in 1977. He led the American League (AL) in saves in 1972 and 1976. With the Yankees, Lyle was a member of the World Series champions in 1977 and 1978, both over the Los Angeles Dodgers. Lyle co-authored, with Peter Golenbock, The Bronx Zoo, a 1979 tell-all book which chronicled the dissension within the Yankees in its World Series Championship seasons of 1977 and 1978. From 1998–2012, Lyle served as manager of the Somerset Patriots, a minor league baseball team of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

Joseph Floyd "Arky" Vaughn starred for the Pittsburgh Pirates for a decade, hitting better than .300 every year and batting 318 lifetime. Honus Wagner, his mentor and a fellow Hall of Famer shortstop, called Vaughn, "one of the sweetest hitters I ever saw. And fast!" Vaughn let the league in runs scored and triples three times each, and in 1935 batted .385, a 20th century record for National League shortstops. Though not a power hitter the nine-time All-Star homered twice in the 1941 Midsummer Classic. The pride of tiny Cliffy, Arkansas ("The Crown Jewel of the Ozark Mountains"), Floyd (Arky) Vaughn made his mark over a 17-year big league career. The dependable shortstop drowned during a fishing trip in 1952, Elected 1985.

Joseph Floyd "Arky" Vaughn starred for the Pittsburgh Pirates for a decade, hitting better than .300 every year and batting 318 lifetime. Honus Wagner, his mentor and a fellow Hall of Famer shortstop, called Vaughn, "one of the sweetest hitters I ever saw. And fast!" Vaughn let the league in runs scored and triples three times each, and in 1935 batted .385, a 20th century record for National League shortstops. Though not a power hitter the nine-time All-Star homered twice in the 1941 Midsummer Classic. The pride of tiny Cliffy, Arkansas ("The Crown Jewel of the Ozark Mountains"), Floyd (Arky) Vaughn made his mark over a 17-year big league career. The dependable shortstop drowned during a fishing trip in 1952, Elected 1985.

Joseph Floyd "Arky" Vaughn starred for the Pittsburgh Pirates for a decade, hitting better than .300 every year and batting 318 lifetime. Honus Wagner, his mentor and a fellow Hall of Famer shortstop, called Vaughn, "one of the sweetest hitters I ever saw. And fast!" Vaughn let the league in runs scored and triples three times each, and in 1935 batted .385, a 20th century record for National League shortstops. Though not a power hitter the nine-time All-Star homered twice in the 1941 Midsummer Classic. The pride of tiny Cliffy, Arkansas ("The Crown Jewel of the Ozark Mountains"), Floyd (Arky) Vaughn made his mark over a 17-year big league career. The dependable shortstop drowned during a fishing trip in 1952, Elected 1985.

William Havon Bruton (November 9, 1925 – December 5, 1995) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who played for the Milwaukee Braves (1953–1960) and Detroit Tigers (1961–1964). Bruton started his major league career in 1953, as the Braves franchise moved from Boston to Milwaukee. On April 14, 1953, his 10th-inning home run gave the Braves a 3–2 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in Milwaukee's first major league game. Bruton played in Milwaukee for eight seasons; he was a member of the 1957 Braves and 1958 Braves, who both played World Series against the New York Yankees. Bruton did not play in the 1957 World Series, which the Braves won in seven games, due to a knee injury sustained earlier in the season. In the 1958 World Series, which the Braves lost in seven games, Bruton hit a game-winning single in the tenth inning of Game 1. He played in all seven games of the Series, batting 7-for-17 (.412) with a home run and two RBIs. On August 2, 1959, Bruton hit two bases-loaded triples in one game. The feat had only been accomplished once before (Elmer Valo, 1949) and has only been accomplished once since (Duane Kuiper, 1978). In December 1960, Bruton was traded to the Detroit Tigers, where he spent four seasons before retiring after the 1964 season.

"Where's the rest of you?" demanded Hall of Famer Cap Anson of Duffy. "This is all there is," was the diminutive rookie's response, but as teams soon discovered, Duffy was plenty to handle. In fact, he authored perhaps the greatest offensive season ever in 1894, with an amazing .440 batting average. Beloved by Boston Beaneaters fans, Duffy helped capture four pennants in the 1890s, while he and teammate Tommy McCarthy were dubbed the "Heavenly Twins" for their stellar outfield play. Duffy spent his entire adult life as a player, manager, coach and scout, eventually tutoring another Boston legend, Ted Williams. Elected 1945.

Shortstop Joe Tinker anchored the infield during the most successful decade in Chicago Cubs history, leading the team to four pennants between 1906 and 1910. "Baseball is no game for mollycoddles," Tinker said. "The man who makes the best player in the long run is the man who has the most spirit, the most aggressiveness." That was Tinker - a standard in the field, a speedy runner, a clutch hitter and a quick thinker. A regular starter at age 21, he excelled for 15 seasons and ended his career as a player-manager for the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Federals and Cubs. Elected 1946.

Bobby Wallace began his career as a pitcher before moving to shortstop, where he starred for the St. Louis Browns for 15 seasons. A steady hitter, Wallace was best known for his defensed, leading the American League in fielding percentage two times and setting a record for most chances in one game (17). Credited with developing the "scoop and throw" method for getting throws to first base faster, he followed his playing career with stints as manager, coach, umpire and scout. "I loved every minute of it," Wallace said of his 60-year baseball career. Elected 1953.

Exhibiting an understated style that became his trademark, Hank Aaron hammered his way to baseball's all-time home run mark via one of the most consistent offensive careers in history. He hit 755 home runs, a record that stood for more than 30 years, and still holds major league marks for total bases, extra base hits and RBI, while his 3,771 career hits ranks third. He was the 1957 National League MVP, won three Gold Glove Awards for his play in right field and was named to a record 25 All-Star teams. Curt Simmons once said of Aaron, "Trying to throw a fastball by him is like trying to sneak a sunrise past a rooster." Elected 1982.

Earl Averill was a nimble center fielder and outstanding offensive performer during his 13 year playing career, spent primarily with the Cleveland Indians. He hit better than .300 in eight seasons, finished with a lifetime average of .318 and held the Indians record for home runs for 55 years. A fan favorite, he smacked 238 home runs and was selected to the American League All-Star team six times. Elected 1975.

In 1969, Ted Williams autographed a ball for Johnny Bench, "To a Hall of Famer for sure." Perhaps the best defensive catcher of all time, Bench won ten straight Gold Glove Awards and popularized the one-handed style of catching. Bench crushed 389 lifetime home runs and batted .267 for his career. He led the National League in home runs twice, RBI three times and total bases once. He won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1970 and 1972 and the World Series MVP in 1976. With Bench behind the plate the Cincinnati Reds won four pennants and two World Series. Elected 1989.

"If you can't imitate him, don't copy him," Yogi Berra once said. There was no imitating Berra, one of the most unique characters in baseball history, known for his witty "Yogi-isms." In 19 seasons as a player, the 18 time All-Star won 14 pennants, 10 World Series and three Most Valuable Player Awards. Berra regularly finished in the top 10 in homers and RBI, including 358 and 1,430 for his career, respectively. In seven seasons managing the New York Yankees and Mets, Berra won pennants in each league and spent 20 seasons as a coach with the Houston Astros, Mets and Yankees. Elected 1972.

A great all-around player, Lou Boudreau became the Cleveland Indians' regular shortstop in 1940, and two years later was named the team's player-manager, one of the youngest ever to hold such a position. He led Cleveland to the 1948 World Series championship and was named the American League Most Valuable Player. A four-time .300 hitter, Boudreau hit .295 for his career and led AL shortstops in fielding eight times. Boudreau will be remembered for inventing the "Williams shift," placing most of the fielders on the right side of the diamond against left handed Red Sox slugger Ted Williams. Elected 1970.

In 21 seasons with the Kansas City Royals, George Brett topped the .300 mark 11 times, becoming the first player to win batting titles in three decades: 1976 (.333). 1980 (.390) and 1990 (.329). He led the American League in hits three times, finishing his career with 3,154, including 665 doubles, 137 triples and 317 homers. The 13 time All-Star was the AL Most Valuable Player in 1980 and earned a Gold Glove Award in 1985, the same year the Royals won their first World Series championship. Elected 1999.

"He was just as fast between his ears as he was with his feet." said sportswriter Joe Williams. "That's what made him harder to stop than a run in a silk stocking." Max Carey hustled on the bases, totaling 738 career steals, leading the National League 10 times during his 20-year career. Defensively, Carey led the league in putouts nine times and recorded 339 outfield assists. He batter better than .300 six times, amassing 2,665 career hits. In 1925, Carey hit .343 during the regular season and .458 in the World Series. Elected 1961.

A U.S. Senator and former governor of Kentucky, Albert "Happy" Chandler succeeded Kenesaw Mountain Landis as commissioner in 1945, guiding Major League Baseball through its historic integration when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. Though he lasted just one six-year term, Chandler upheld Landis' model as an authoritarian with honesty and respect, suspending players for leaving for the Mexican League and banning Leo Durocher for one year for a series of actions. Chandler also established the now common practice of six umpires on the field for World Series games. Elected 1982.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

A standout who played in the Mexican, Negro and Cuban leagues, Ray Dandridge is often called the best third baseman never to make the majors. Dandridge was masterful on defense, combining a cannon arm with terrific reflexes and sure hands, while offensively he used excellent bat control to spray line drives throughout the ballpark. After the color line was broken, he won Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player honors in his two minor league seasons. The following year, the aging legend roomed with and mentored a promising youngster named Willie Mays. Elected 1987.

"I knew being accepted was going to be hard, but I knew I was involved in a situation that was going to bring opportunities to other blacks," said Larry Doby, the first African American in the American League. Doby broke the junior circuit's color barrier in 1947, just weeks after Jackie Robinson's NL debut. He was signed by the Cleveland Indians following a short career with the Negro National League's Newark Eagles, where he played alongside future Hall of Famer Monte Irvin. A power-hitting center fielder and a key member of Cleveland's 1948 and 1954 pennant winners, Doby twice led the AL in home runs and was a seven-time All-Star in 13 major league seasons. Elected 1998.

Described by Hall of Famer Joe Cronin as "fine a man as ever wore a spike shoe," Bobby Doerr compiled a career .980 fielding percentage as the Boston Red Sox's second baseman for 14 seasons. Also a powerful hitter, he drove in 100 runs six times, with a high of 120 in 1950. Doerr once set an American League Record by handling 414 chances without an error and frequently led the circuit's second baseman in double plays, putouts and assists. Hall of Fame teammate Ted Williams called Doerr "the silent captain of the Red Sox." Elected 1986.

A strong and durable receiver for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators, Rick Ferrell set an American League record for games caught (1,806) that lasted more than 40 years. Ferrell had a special knack for handling the knuckler - the out-pitch for four Senator starters. The reliable backstop hit .281 lifetime and better than .300 four times during an 18-year career. Connie Mack's respect for the North Carolina farm boy was so great that Ferrell caught all nice innings of the first All-Star Game in 1933. Ferrell was ultimately names to seven All-Star teams. Elected 1984.

Rollie Fingers' 17-year career traced the development of the modern-day relief ace. An inconsistent starter, Fingers moved into the bullpen where he excelled quickly and frequently in an unspecialized role. "I was pitching four or five innings sometimes." Fingers said. "There was no such thing as a setup man. I was my own." Relying on a sharp slider, Fingers became the first pitcher to top 300 saves, totaling 341. Known for his handlebar mustache, Fingers became a regular during the postseason, appearing in 16 World Series games. The seven-time All-Star also won both the American League and Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1981. Elected 1992.

Ford Frick worked as a sportswriter and broadcaster before becoming the National League president in 1934. As president, he provided the official support necessary to establish the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. When opposition arose to Jackie Robinson playing in the majors in 1947, Frick warned potential strikers that they would "be barred from baseball even though it means the disruption of a club or a whole league." Frick became Commissioner in 1951, serving in that post for 14 seasons and overseeing relocations, expansion and the transition from radio to television, which broadened coverage of the game. Elected 1970.

Known as the "Fordham Flash," Frankie Frisch jumped directly from Fordham University to the New York Giants and played o eight pennant winners in 19 seasons. A switch-hitter, Frisch compiled 11 straight .300 seasons and retired with numerous fielding records for second basemen. Recalling Frisch, writer Damon Runyon wrote, "Tell 'em most especially about the way Frisch played second base, some of center field and a slice of right field too." As player-manager (and later, manger) of the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch instilled the rollicking, all-out style of hard-nosed play that produced two World Series championships and prompted sportswriters to tab the Cardinals "The Gashouse Gang." Elected 1947.

Known as "The Mechanical Man" for his remarkable consistency, Charlie Gehringer batted better than .300 in 13 seasons and collected more than 200 hits seven times. As New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez put it, "He's in a rut. He goes 2 for 5 on Opening Day and stays that way all season." An agile second baseman with quick hands, Gehringer led the league in assists and fielding percentage seven times each. Regarding his quiet reputation, the six-time All-Star said, "You can't talk your way into a batting championship." A cornerstone of three pennant-winning Tigers teams, he won the 1937 Most Valuable Player Award by batting .371. Elected 1949.

William Jennings Bryan "Billy" Herman was the model for all National League second basemen in the 1930's and early 1940's. A smart player with great bat control, he mastered the hit-and-run and the bunt. Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher said Herman was, "universally accepted as the classic number two hitter...an absolute master of hitting behind a runner." Herman batted .304 for his career and was a 10-time All-Star. His hitting and solid defense let to three Chicago Cubs pennants in the 1930's and one with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941. Elected 1975.

One of Charlie Finley's "bonus babies" of the mid 1960's, Jim "Catfish" Hunter showed his brilliance in a May 1968 perfect game, the first hurled in the American League in 46 years. Hunter used control as his trump card and went on to fie consecutive 20-win seasons, never losing his laid-back, down-home attitude. "If I hadn't played baseball, I wanted to be a game warden or something," he claimed. Sadly, Hunter's life was cut short by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, the same disease that felled Lou Gehrig. Elected 1987.

Reggie Jackson was among the most charismatic players ever to don a baseball uniform. One of the few athletes to have a candy bar named after him, Jackson backed up his celebrity persona with 563 home runs and 11 trips to the postseason - including five World Series titles - in a 21-season major league career. "Mr. October's" crowning moment came in Game 6 of the 1977 Fall Classic when he belted three home runs - on three consecutive pitches - against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Elected 1993.

Pitching in a era "when the manager gave you the ball and didn't expect it back until the game was over," Ferguson "Fergie" Jenkins name could perennially be found among the league's leaders in games won, complete games and innings pitched. The Canadian right-hander showcased a variety of pitches while amassing 284 victories during a 19-year career. However, control was Jenkins' chief asset. "My game plan is simple: I throw strikes and make 'em hit the ball. When I can do that, I'm on my way to a winning season." And there were plenty of those for the seven-time 20-game winner. Elected 1991.

George Kell worked diligently on all facets of the game to become a superb batter, sure-handed fielder and all around leader, culminating in a 1949 American League batting championship, when he beat out Ted Williams by .0002 and denied Williams his third Triple Crown. Kell batted .300 nine times and topped all AL third basemen in fielding percentage seven times, also pacing the circuit in double plays two times, assists four times and putouts twice. "You never stop watching, and you never stop learning." said Kell. Elected 1983

Harmon Killebrew epitomized raw power. His quiet demeanor contradicted an awesome presences at the plate, deserving of the nickname "Killer." "I did have power," he explained. In 22 major league seasons Killebrew blasted 573 home runs, including many monumental blows estimated at more than 500 feet. The 13-time All-Star was one of the first sluggers to receive intentional walks with the bases empty and captured the 1969 American League MVP Award, leading the circuit with 49 home runs and 140 RBI. Elected 1984.

Although Bob Lemon debuted in the major leagues as a position player, mangers recognized his strong throwing arm and transformed the outfielder into a major league pitcher. During one nine-year span, Lemon logged seven 20-win seasons and helped propel the Cleveland Indians' 1948 and 1954 pennant drives. Lemon later became a successful manager, leading the New York Yankees to a World Series victory in 1978. New York Times sportswriter Steve Cady once wrote, "The line on Lemon is that the next person to say something bad about him will be the first." Elected 1976.

Al Lopez was just 17 when he impressed Walter Johnson, baseball's best pitcher of the day, as a minor league catcher. His major league career would span a record 1,918 games - an unmatched mark for backstops for more than 40 years. From 1951 to 1959, as manager of the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox, Lopez won two pennants and finished second to the New York Yankees the other seven years. His 1954 Cleveland squad won 111 games, an American League record that lasted 44 years. In 1959, he led the "Go-Go" White Sox to their first pennant since 1919. Elected 1977.

Al Lopez was just 17 when he impressed Walter Johnson, baseball's best pitcher of the day, as a minor league catcher. His major league career would span a record 1,918 games - an unmatched mark for backstops for more than 40 years. From 1951 to 1959, as manager of the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox, Lopez won two pennants and finished second to the New York Yankees the other seven years. His 1954 Cleveland squad won 111 games, an American League record that lasted 44 years. In 1959, he led the "Go-Go" White Sox to their first pennant since 1919. Elected 1977.

Tris Speaker once declared, "If I had the choice for any pitcher for a clutch game, the guy I'd pick would be Ted Lyons." Nearly every Sunday afternoon, Ted Lyons would take the mound for the Chicago White Sox, and the result was almost always the same; a victory.. Lyon, who won 260 games, abandoned his law school plans by signing with Chicago in 1923 and became a top draw for the club for 21 years. After a World War II stint in the Marines, Lyons returned to manage the Sox for three seasons. Elected 1955.

The pride of the Dominican Republic, Juan Antonio Marichal Sanchez won 243 games and lost only 142 during 16 major league seasons. Hank Aaron once explained, "He can throw all day within a two inch space - in, out, up or down. I've never seen anyone as good as that." The high-kicking right-hander enjoyed six 20-win seasons, earning 10 All-Star Game selections. The "Dominican Dandy" twice led the National League in complete games, shutouts and wins, completing 244 games during his career while fanning 2,303 and compiling a 2.89 ERA. After his playing days, Marichal became Minister of Sports in his homeland. Elected 1983.

In 1908, the New York Giants paid a then-record $11,000 for the contract of minor league southpaw Richard "Rube" Marquard. Three years later, he would lead the team to its first of three straight pennants (1911-1913). In 1912., Marquard earned victories inn his first 19 decisions, finishing the season - and leading the National League - with 26 wins. In 1915, Marquard no-hit the Brooklyn Dodgers before brokering his own sale to the club, helping them win the NL pennant the following year. A three-time 20-game winner, Marquard once said of his off-speed pitching style, "Any hitter can hit a fast one, but not many can hit slow ones." Elected 1971.

Willie Mays, the "Say Hey Kid", excelled at all phases of the game with a boyish enthusiasm and infectious exuberance. His staggering career statistics totaled 3,283 hits and 660 home runs. "You used to think if the score was 5-0, he'd hit a five run home run," recalled Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson. The New York Giants superstar earned National League Rookie of the Year in 1951 and two NL MVP Awards (1954 and 1965). He accumulated 12 Gold Glove Awards and played in a record tying 24 All-Star Games. His catch of Vic Wertz's deep fly ball in the 1954 World Series remains one of baseball's memorable moments. Elected 1979.

In 1954, 17-year old Bill Mazerowski signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates as a shortstop and was promptly moved to second base two years later. Mazerowski made his major league debut for Pittsburgh where he would spend his entire career. He was one of the best defensive second baseman in history, posting a lifetime .983 fielding percentage. The 10-time National League All-Star led his league in assists nice times, fielding percentage three times and double plays eight times. A consistent batter who pounded out 2,016 career hits, "Maz" achieved iconic status in the 1960 World Series, when he became the first player to end a series game with a home run. Elected 2001

Johnny Mize, the burly first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and New York Yankees, paced or tied for the National League lead in home runs four times, hitting three in a single game on six occasions. The 10-time All-Star also won three RBI crowns and one batting championship. After the "Big Cat" joined the Yankees, they won five consecutive World Series titles (1949-1953), with Mize batting .400 and hitting three homers in the 1952 Fall Classic. He finished his career with 359 home runs and a .312 batting average. Elected 1981.

Paul Molitor's career was forged on his strength of collecting base hits, versatility in the field and savvy on the base paths. As a member of the Milwaukee Brewers, Toronto Blue Jays and Minnesota Twins, the seven-time All-Star batted better than .300 in 12 seasons, fashioning a 39-game hitting streak in 1987. Molitor collected a record five hits for Milwaukee in game 1 of the 1982 World Series and, 11 years later, earned World Series MVP honors with Toronto. Appearing in more than 400 games at three different positions, Molitor totaled 3,319 hits, 504 stolen bases and 605 doubles. Elected 2004.

Consistency, durability and dominance characterized the career of Eddie Clarence Murphy, one of baseball's most productive hitters from the late 1970s through the 1990s. Murray is one of only four players to have totaled both 3,000 hits and 500 home runs. The all-time career RBI leader among switch-hitters - and a three time Gold Glove Award winner at first base - Murray was an eight-time All-Star with six consecutive top-10 finishes in voting for the MVP Award. Murray was a stalwart at first base for 13 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles, capturing a World Series championship in 1983. Elected 2003.

It takes a special weapon to pitch nearly a quarter of a century in the majors, and Phil Niekro's was the knuckleball. The pitch helped, "Knucksie" record 318 wins, 3,342 strikeouts and a 3.35 ERA during a 24-year career spent mostly with the Atlanta Braves. Niekro's famed pitch bewildered batters, Rick Monday once said, "The knuckleball actually giggles at your as it goes by," while Bobby Mercer recalled that "trying to hit him is like trying to eat Jell-O with chopsticks." Bob Uecker that catching Niekro was rewarding: "I got to meet a lot of important people, they all sit behind home plate."

Jim Palmer was a "big game" pitcher for nearly two decades, helping the Baltimore Orioles to eight postseason appearances, six pennants and three World Series titles. Using his trademark high kick and smooth delivery, Palmer retired with 268 victories, eight 20-win seasons and three Cy Young Awards. Said Palmer on being elected to the Hall of Fame, "I'm here because I played for the Baltimore Orioles. I was surrounded by great players. We had the kind of teams that, if you would get in shape and get out there, you'd win close to 20 games every season." Elected 1990.

Cal Ripken Jr. gave new meaning to the phrase "everyday player." From May 30, 1982 through September 19, 1998, the lanky shortstop played in 2,632 consecutive games for the Orioles, shattering Lou Gehrig's "unbreakable" mark of 2,130. Beyond "The Streak," however, Ripken methodically put together a remarkable career, notching 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, 19 straight All-Star appearances and two MVP Awards. Though his solid, steady play earned him hero status throughout America, Ripken also had a fair for the dramatic, homering in both his record-setting 2,131st consecutive game and his final All-Star game. Elected 2007.

Shortstop Phil Rizzuto as an integral part of the New York Yankees teams in the 1940s and 1950s, which won nine pennants and seven World Series titles. Ted Williams once said, "If the Red Sox would have had Phil, we would have won all those pennants." Joe DiMaggio claimed Rizzuto "held the team together." While "Scooter" could handle a bat, notably hitting .324 to win the 1950 AL MVP Award, his defense might have been more important. "My best pitch," teammate Vic Raschi said, "is anything the batter grounds, lines or pops up in the direction of Rizzuto." Elected 1994.

A major league player, manager, coach, executive and broadcaster, Frank Robinson has done it all. A two-time MVP (once in each league), Robinson was an aggressive outfielder and hard-charging base runner. "Frank was a great player," Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax said, "He had great tools, and he had great desire. He beat you any way he could." The 1986 American League Triple Crown winner, Robinson concluded his career with 586 home runs and just 57 hits shy of 3,000. His intelligence and leadership helped him become the major leagues' first African-American manager when he was named player-manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1975. Elected 1982.

One of the best line-drive hitters in history, Edd Roush swung a heavy bat and seldom struck out. His speed proved an asset in the field and on the basepaths. A shrewd businessman and a good baseball mind, Roush invested wisely and was independently wealthy by the time he retired. Contract squabbles often kept Roush from Spring Training, but he kept himself in such phenomenal shape year-round that manager Pat Moran once said, "All that fella has to do is wash his hands, adjust his cap and he's in shape to hit. Elected 1962.

Charles Herbert "Red" Ruffing anchored six New York Yankees World Series championship teams in the 1930s and early 1940s. He was a player who teammate and Hall of Fame catcher, Bill Dickey described as "the best pitcher (I) ever caught." Though Ruffing lost four toes on his left foot in a mining accident as a teenager, he successfully transitioned from outfielder to pitcher. A veteran of World War II, Ruffing continued his baseball career as a manager, coach and scout for a multitude of teams in organized baseball. Elected 1967.

With a dominating fastball and an unsurpassed work ethic, Nolan Ryan's career spanned four decades and culminated with an MLB-record 5,714 strikeouts. Ryan threw so hard - and could be so wild - that Reggie Jackson described him as "the only guy who could put fear in me. Not because he could get me out, but because he could kill me. You just hoped to mix in a walk so you could have a good night and go 0-for-3." Often among the league leaders in strikeouts, Ryan won 324 games and pitched a major league record seven no-hitters, three more that any other hurler in history. As team president of the Texas Rangers from 2008 until 2013, Ryan led the franchise to its first two World Series appearances (2010 and 2011). Elected 1999.

Curtis Montague Schilling is a former Major League baseball right-handed pitcher, former video game developer, and former baseball color analyst. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993, and won championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks, and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11-2, and his .846 postseason winning percentage is a major league record among pitchers with at least 10 decisions. He is a member of the 3,000 strikeout club and has the highest strikeout-to-walk of any of its members. He is tied for third for the most 300-strikeout seasons. Of post 19th century pitchers, Schilling has the second highest JAWS of any pitcher not in the Hall of Fame.

Tremendous power and a keen batting eye led Hall of Fame pitcher Bruce Sutter to call Mike Schmidt "the best hitter in the game." In 1980, the 12-time All-Star won his first of three NL MVP Awards, leading the Philadelphia Phillies to their first-ever World Series title. His flair for dramatic and mammoth clouts resulted in 548 career home runs, while steady fielding earned him 10 Gold Glove Awards - including nine straight - at third base. Elected 1995.

Ozzie Smith, "The Wizard of Oz," was in a class by himself when it came to fielding at shortstop, earning the National League Gold Glove Award in 13 straight seasons (1980-1992). In addition to setting major league records for assist, double plays and total chances by a shortstop, Smith proved to be a valuable offensive weapon, amassing 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases in his 19-year career. A 15-time All-Star, Smith was a key contributor to the St. Louis Cardinals' World Series championship in 1982. Elected 2002.

Stylish Warren Spahn is the winningest left-hander in history with 363 victories - all but seven coming as a member of the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. Spahn turned 25 years old before winning his first game and was a 23-game winner 17 years later. Following his credo that "hitting is timing and pitching is upsetting timing," he used a wide repertoire of pitches and a smooth overhand delivery to baffle hitters for 21 seasons, winning 20 games 13 times. The World War II veteran hurled two no-hitters and won the 1957 Cy Young Award. Elected 1973.

Responsible for popularizing the split-finger fastball, Bruce Sutter inspired manager Whitey Herzog to declare him, "the most dominating relief pitcher I've ever seen." Playing with the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and Atlanta Braves, Sutter saved 300 games in his career, five times leading the National League, and was the 1979 Cy Young Award winner. Regularly recording multi-inning saves - Sutter pitched 80 innings or more 10 times in 12 seasons - he baffled hitters with his late-breaking splitter. Sutter learned the devastating pitch from Cubs minor league pitching instructor Fred Martin while recovering from surgery on his pitching elbow in 1973, and claimed it saved his career. Elected 2006.

Earl Weaver's management style could be described as feisty, confrontational and opinionated, but behind the raucous façade was a first-rate baseball mind. The "Earl of Baltimore" - emphasized pitching, defense and the three- run homerun. Weaver explained, "A managers job is to select the best players for what he wants done. They're not all great players, but they can all do something." His organizational system, revered as "The Oriole Way," focused on fundamental skills and planned player development, a formula that led to four American League pennants and one World Series championship (1970) during his tenure. Elected 1996.

Theodore Samuel Williams had only one goal in life; to walk down the street and have people say, "There goes the greatest hitter who ever lived." In a 19 year career with the Boston Red Sox - twice interrupted by military service - "The Splendid Splinter" won two Triple Crowns, two MVP Awards and six batting championships. He retired with a career average of .344 and remains the last player to top .400 for a full season (batting .406 in 1941). With keen eyesight, quick wrists and a simple motto - "Get a good ball to hit" - Williams compiled all the evidence he needed to achieve his goal. Elected 1966.

Alexander Cartwright is often referred to as "The Father of Modern Baseball." Cartwright was a founding and influential member of the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York city, baseball's first organized club. He played a key role in formalizing the first published rules of the game, including the concepts of four territory, the distance between bases, three-out innings, nine-member teams with fixed batting orders, and the elimination of retiring base runners by throwing batted baseballs at them. In 1849, Cartwright traveled west, sowing the seeds of baseball all the way to California and subsequently Hawaii. Elected 1938.

Alexander Cartwright is often referred to as "The Father of Modern Baseball." Cartwright was a founding and influential member of the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York city, baseball's first organized club. He played a key role in formalizing the first published rules of the game, including the concepts of four territory, the distance between bases, three-out innings, nine-member teams with fixed batting orders, and the elimination of retiring base runners by throwing batted baseballs at them. In 1849, Cartwright traveled west, sowing the seeds of baseball all the way to California and subsequently Hawaii. Elected 1938.

Walter Anton Berger (October 10, 1905 – November 30, 1988) was a Major League Baseball outfielder who played for four National League teams, primarily the Boston Braves. Berger was the National League's starting center fielder in baseball's first All-Star Game. One of the league's top sluggers of the early 1930s, in his initial 1930 season he hit 38 home runs, a record for rookies which stood until 1987; he still holds a share of the NL record. He also led the league in home runs and runs batted in in 1935 despite the Braves having the fourth-most losses in MLB history, and went on to become the seventh NL player to hit 200 career home runs.

Thomas David Henrich (February 20, 1913 – December 1, 2009), nicknamed "The Clutch" and "Old Reliable", was an American professional baseball player of German descent. He played his entire Major League Baseball career as a right fielder and first baseman for the New York Yankees (1937–1942 and 1946–1950). Henrich led the American League in triples twice and in runs scored once, also hitting 20 or more home runs four times. He is best remembered for his numerous exploits in the World Series; he was involved in one of the most memorable plays in Series history in 1941, was the hitting star of the 1947 Series with a .323 batting average, and hit the first walk-off home run in Series history in the first game of the 1949 World Series. Oral Clyde Hildebrand (April 7, 1907 – September 8, 1977) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1931 to 1940. He played for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, and New York Yankees. Hildebrand started his professional baseball career in 1930 with the American Association's Indianapolis Indians. In two seasons, he went just 14–18 but made it to the major leagues in late 1931. Hildebrand broke into the Cleveland Indians' starting rotation in 1933. That season, he went 16–11, led the American League in shutouts with six, and was selected to the All-Star team. He pitched a one-hitter on April 26.[7] From 1934 to 1936, he continued to pitch effectively for the Indians, going 30–28 in those years. Hildebrand also had several public disputes with manager Walter Johnson, which ended when Johnson was fired in 1935. In 1937, Hildebrand was traded to the Browns in a blockbuster deal. He struggled in two seasons with St. Louis and was then traded again, to the Yankees. In 1939, he went 10–4 with a career-low 3.06 earned run average, helping the Yankees win the AL pennant. He started game 4 of the World Series and pitched four shutout innings, as the Yankees clinched the title. Hildebrand went back to the minor leagues in 1941 and retired the following year.

Harold Henry Schumacher (November 23, 1910 – April 21, 1993), nicknamed "Prince Hal", was an American professional baseball player and right-handed pitcher who appeared in 391 games pitched (and 450 games in all) in Major League Baseball for the New York Giants (1931–42; 1946. Schumacher was still an undergraduate at St. Lawrence University when he first signed with the Giants in 1931. He required only eight games of minor league seasoning before earning a place on the Giants' pitching staff in 1932. The following year (during which he received his degree from St. Lawrence), Schumacher helped pitch the Giants to the 1933 National League pennant and World Series championship. His 19 victories, 2582/3 innings pitched, 21 complete games, seven shutouts and 2.16 earned run average were second on the staff only to Carl Hubbell, the future Baseball Hall of Fame left-hander. During the 1933 fall classic, he started two games against the Washington Senators and won Game 2, 6–1, turning in a complete game, five-hit effort and driving in three runs himself. He also started the clinching Game 5, and departed in the sixth inning with the score tied, 3–3. Adolfo Luque came on in relief and was the winning pitcher, as the Giants triumphed 4–3 in extra innings. Schumacher was selected to the National League squad for two of the first three All-Star games ever played, including the maiden 1933 midsummer classic. He did not appear in that contest, but returned to the NL All-Star team in 1935 and hurled four innings of one-run ball in the American League's 4–1 victory at Cleveland Stadium.

William Henry "Bucky" Walters was a Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher and the 1939 National League MVP. A native of Philadelphia, ,Walters played for the Boston Braves, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds. He batted and threw right handed.

William Henry "Bucky" Walters was a Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher and the 1939 National League MVP. A native of Philadelphia, ,Walters played for the Boston Braves, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds. He batted and threw right handed.

Legendary baseball promoter Henry Chadwick once wrote, "There is no doubt that Harry Wright is the father of professional ball playing." William Henry "Harry" Wright organized, managed and played centerfield for baseball's first all-professional team, the famed 1869 Cincinnati Restocking's. Wright first played baseball with the New York Knickerbockers and later guided the Boston Red Stockings to four straight National Association pennants (1872-1875) and National League titles in 1877 and 1878. According to Chadwick, Wright was "the most experienced, skillful and successful manager of a base ball team in the professional fraternity." Elected 1953.

Legendary baseball promoter Henry Chadwick once wrote, "There is no doubt that Harry Wright is the father of professional ball playing." William Henry "Harry" Wright organized, managed and played centerfield for baseball's first all-professional team, the famed 1869 Cincinnati Restocking's. Wright first played baseball with the New York Knickerbockers and later guided the Boston Red Stockings to four straight National Association pennants (1872-1875) and National League titles in 1877 and 1878. According to Chadwick, Wright was "the most experienced, skillful and successful manager of a base ball team in the professional fraternity." Elected 1953.

A pioneer of early baseball, Henry Chadwick influenced the game by wielding a pen, not bat. The renowned journalist developed the modern box score, introduced statistics such as batting average and the concept of earned and unearned runs, wrote numerous instructional manuals on the game and edited multiple baseball guides. He was an influential member of baseball's early rules committees, and his tireless work and devoted love for the game greatly aided in popularizing baseball during its infancy. Elected 1938.

Juan Pizarro a.k.a. "Terín" (born February 7, 1937) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He played for 18 seasons on 9 teams, from 1957 through 1974. In 1964, he won 19 games (19–9) and pitched 4 shutouts for the Chicago White Sox. He also was an All-Star player in 1963 and 1964. Pizarro signed with the Milwaukee Braves as an amateur free agent in 1956. After going 27–6 with a 2.06 earned run average in the minors, he made his major league debut on May 4, 1957 against the Pittsburgh Pirates at only twenty years old. He pitched seven strong innings, giving up only one run, however, the Braves managed only two hits off opposing pitcher Vern Law, and Pizzarro lost his debut, 1–0. For the season, he went 5–6 with a 4.62 ERA. The Braves beat the New York Yankees in a seven-game World Series that year; Pizarro's only appearance came in Milwaukee's 12–3 loss in game three. He split 1958 between Milwaukee and the triple A Wichita Braves, and was again included on the Braves' post-season roster as they faced the Yankees in the World Series for the second year in a row. This time the Yankees won the Series in seven games. Pizarro's only appearance again came in a loss in game five. Pizarro remained with the Braves through 1960, compiling a 23–19 record and 3.93 ERA in Milwaukee. On December 15, 1960, he was traded with Joey Jay to the Cincinnati Reds for Roy McMillan, then immediately sent by the Reds with Cal McLish to the Chicago White Sox for Gene Freese.

Circa 1890 Morgan Bulkeley signed cut signature: A veteran of the Union Army in the Civil War and first president of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, Bulkeley is best remembered today as the founder of the Hartford Dark Blues of the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (1874) and first president of the National League (1876). Elected 1937.

Joseph Wilbur Adcock (October 30, 1927 – May 3, 1999) was a major league baseball player and manager in the Major and Minor Leagues. He was best known as a first baseman and right-handed slugger with the powerful Milwaukee Braves teams of the 1950s, whose career included numerous home run feats. A sure-handed defensive player, he later retired with the third highest career fielding percentage by a first baseman (.994). His nickname "Billy Joe" was modeled after Vanderbilt University basketball star "Billy Joe Adcock" and was popularized by Vin Scully. Born in Coushatta, the seat of Red River Parish in northwestern Louisiana, Adcock attended Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, where he played on the baseball team; before attending college he had never played a game of baseball in his life. He was signed by the Cincinnati Reds, however Ted Kluszewski had firm hold on the team's first base slot. Adcock played in left field from 1950 to 1952, but was extremely unhappy, demanding a trade, which he received. His first season with the Milwaukee Braves was capped by a mammoth home run into the center field bleachers at the Polo Grounds on April 29, 1953, a feat which had never been done before and would only be accomplished twice more, by Hank Aaron and Lou Brock. On July 31, 1954, Adcock accomplished the rare feat of homering four times in a single game, against the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field, also hitting a double off the top of the wall to set a record for most total bases in a game (18) which stood for 48 years, until broken by Shawn Green in 2002.

Richard Anthony Allen is a former Major League Baseball player and Rhythm and Blues singer. He played 15 seasons in the major leagues as a first baseman, third baseman and out fielder most notably for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox, and is ranked among his sport's top offensive producers of the 1960s and early 1970s. Allen was an All-Star for seven seasons. He won the 1964 National League Rookie of the Year Award and the 1972 American League MVP Award. He also led the American League in home runs for two seasons, led the NL in slugging percentage one season and the AL tow seasons, and led both leagues in on-base percentage each for one season. His .534 career slugging percentage ranks among the highest in an era marked by low offensive production.

Albert Jojuan Belle is a former Major League Baseball outfielder for the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox and Baltimore Orioles. Standing at 6 feet 2 inches and weighing 225 pound, Belle was on of the leading sluggers of his time, and in 1995 became the first and still only player to ever hit 50 doubles and 50 home runs in a single season. He was also the first player to break the 10-million-dollar per year compensation contract in Major League Baseball. Belle was also considered a model of consistency, compiling a .295 career batting average, and averaging 37 home runs and 120 RBIs a season between 1991 and 2000. Belle is also one of only six players in MLB history to have nine consecutive 100-RBI seasons. However, his combative personality, marked by occasional angry outbursts, created a reputation that followed him throughout his major-league career.

Adrian Beltre Perez is a Dominican professional baseball third baseman playing for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball. Originally signed as an amateur free agent, he made his MLB debut with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998 at the age of 19. He subsequently played for the Seattle Mariners, Boston Red Sox and Rangers. He bats and throws right-handed. He has since become one of the most all-around accomplished players in history, he ranks 13th in defensive Wins Above Replacement and is the fourth third baseman to reach 400 home runs and 1,500 RBI. Beltre is a four-time selection for the Silver Slugger Award and MLB All-Star Game, and five-time winner of the Rawlings Gold Glove Award.

Robert Ray Buhl (August 12, 1928 – February 16, 2001) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the Milwaukee Braves, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His last name rhymes with "fuel".A native of Saginaw, Michigan, in a 15-year career Buhl posted a 166–132 record with 1288 strikeouts and a 3.55 ERA in 2587 innings. He pitched 111 complete games and compiled 20 shutouts. He was first signed to a major league contract in 1953 by Milwaukee Braves scout Earle W. Halstead. Buhl compiled an 8–1 record against the National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956, in route to an 18-win season. He repeated as an 18-game winner the following year, helping the Braves capture NL pennants in both 1957 and 1958 as the third starter behind Warren Spahn and Lew Burdette.

Selva Lewis Burdette, Jr. was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played primarily for the Boston and Milwaukee Braves. The team's top right-hander during its years in Milwaukee, he was the Most Valuable Player of the 1957 World Series, leading the franchise to its first championship in 43 years, and the only title in Milwaukee history. An outstanding control pitcher, his career average of 1.84 walks per nine innings pitched places him behind only Robin Roberts (1.73), Greg Maddux (1.80), Carl Hubbell, (1.82) and Juan Marichal (1.82) among pitchers with at least 3,000 innings since 1920.

Jose Miguel Cabrera Torres, commonly known as Miguel Cabrera and nicknamed "Miggy" is currently the first baseman for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball. Since his debut in 2003 he has been a two-time American League MVP Award winner, a four time AL batting champion, and an 11-time MLB All-Star. He has played at first and third base for most of his major league career, but primarily played left and right field before 2006. He claimed the 17th MLB Triple Crown in 2012, the first to do so in 46 seasons.

Jose' Canseco Capas Jr., is a Cuban-American former Major League Baseball outfielder and designated hitter. During his time with the Oakland A's, he established himself as one of the premier power hitters in the game. He won the Rookie of the Year, and MVP Awards and was a six-time All-Star. Canseco is a two time World Series winner, once with the Oakland A's and once with the New York Yankees.

William Benjamin Chapman (December 25, 1908 – July 7, 1993) was an American outfielder, pitcher, and manager in Major League Baseball who played for several teams. He began his career with the New York Yankees, playing his first seven seasons there. During the period from 1926 to 1943, Chapman had more stolen bases than any other player, leading the American League four times. After twelve seasons, during which he batted .302 and led the AL in assists and double plays twice each, he spent two years in the minor leagues and returned to the majors as a National League pitcher for three seasons, becoming player-manager of the Philadelphia Phillies, his final team. His playing reputation was eclipsed by the role he played in 1947 as manager of the Phillies, antagonizing Jackie Robinson by shouting racist epithets and opposing his presence on a major league team on the basis of Robinson's race with unsportsmanlike conduct that proved an embarrassment for his team.

Rocco Domineco "Rocky" Colavito Jr. is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball best known for his year's with the Cleveland Indians. Colavito was the fifth player in American League history to have eleven consecutive 20-home run seasons, and he exceeded 40 home runs three times and 100 RBI six times during that span. He also led the AL in home runs, RBI and slugging percentage once each. Hitting all but three of his 374 career home runs in the AL, he ranked behind only Jimmie Foxx and Harmon Killebrew among the league's right-handed hitters when he retired.

Donald Eugene Conley (November 10, 1930 – July 4, 2017) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played 11 seasons from 1952 to 1963 for four teams. Conley also played forward in the 1952–53 season and from 1958 to 1964 for two teams in the National Basketball Association. He is best known for being one of only two people (the other being Otto Graham–1946 NBL and AAFC Championship, plus three more AAFC and three NFL championships) to win championships in two of the four major American sports, one with the Milwaukee Braves in the 1957 World Series and three Boston Celtics championships from 1959–61.

Delmar Wesley Crandall (born March 5, 1930 in Ontario, California[1]) is an American former professional baseball player and manager. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball and played most of his career with the Boston & Milwaukee Braves.[1][2] Considered one of the National League's top catchers during the 1950s and early 1960s, he led the league in assists a record-tying six times, in fielding percentage four times and in putouts three times. Crandall was signed as an amateur free agent by the Braves in 1948.[5] He was only 19 when he first played in a major league game with the 1949 Boston Braves.[1] He appeared in 146 games for Boston in 1949-1950 before entering military service during the Korean War. When his two-year hitch was over in March 1953, the Braves departed Boston for Milwaukee, where – benefitting from a powerful offense featuring Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews and Joe Adcock – they soon became both successful on the field and phenomenally popular off it. Crandall seized the regular catcher's job from veteran Walker Cooper in 1953 and held it for eight years, handling star Braves pitchers such as left-hander Warren Spahn and right-handers Lew Burdette and Bob Buhl. As a testament to Crandall's pitch calling skills, between 1953 and 1959, the Braves' pitching staff finished either first or second in the National League in team earned run average every year except 1955. Burdette credited Crandall for some of his success saying, "I never- well hardly ever- have to shake him off. He knows the job like no one else, and you can have faith in his judgment".[7] On September 11, 1955, with the Braves trailing the Philadelphia Phillies 4-1 with two outs and a 3-2 count in the ninth inning, Crandall hit a dramatic grand slam home run to win the game.[8] The Braves won National League pennants in 1957 and 1958,[9][10] also finishing in second place five times between 1953 and 1960, and captured the 1957 World Series championship – the franchise's first title since 1914. Although he only batted .211 in the 1957 Series against the New York Yankees, Crandall had a solo home run for the Braves' last tally in a 5-0 win in the deciding Game 7.

Raymond Hayes Crone (born August 7, 1931 in Memphis, Tennessee, USA) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the Milwaukee Braves from 1954 to 1957 and the New York / San Francisco Giants from 1957 to 1958. Crone made his major league debut on April 13, 1954 at age 22. He spent 19 games with the big-league club, starting two of them and going 1–0 with a 2.02 ERA in 49 innings of work. Of all pitchers on the team that season, he had the second-lowest ERA (trailing only Charlie Gorin's 1.86). He also spent 14 games in the minor leagues that season. With the Braves in 1955, Crone went 10–9 with a 3.46 ERA in 33 games (15 starts). In 1401/3 innings, he allowed only 117 hits. Though he spent time in the minors in 1955, it was a short stint – only four games. He went 11–10 with a 3.87 ERA in 35 games in 1956. Crone began the 1957 season with the Braves, going 3–1 with a 4.46 ERA in 11 games (five starts). On June 15, he was traded with Danny O'Connell and Bobby Thomson to the New York Giants for Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst. He went 4–8 with a 4.33 ERA with the Giants that year and went a combined 7–9 with a 4.36 ERA. Crone played his final major league season in 1958, going 1–2 with a 6.75 ERA in 14 games (one start). On July 15 of that year, he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs for Don Johnson. He finished the season in the minor leagues, playing his final big-league game on July 14.

Anthony Francis "Tony" Cuccinello (November 8, 1907 – September 21, 1995) was an American professional baseball second baseman and third baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, Brooklyn Dodgers, Boston Bees, New York Giants, Boston Braves, and Chicago White Sox between 1930 and 1945. He was the older brother and uncle of former major league players Al Cuccinello and Sam Mele. His surname was pronounced "coo-chi-NELL-oh". A native of Long Island City, New York, Cuccinello led the National League second basemen in assists and double plays three times and hit .300 or better five times, with a career high .315 in 1931. He was selected for MLB's first All-Star Game, played on July 6, 1933 at Comiskey Park, batting as a pinch-hitter for Carl Hubbell in the 9th inning. He also was selected for the 1938 All-Star Game. On August 13, 1931, as a member of the Cincinnati Reds, he went 6-6, scoring 4 runs and recording 5 RBI in a 17-3 rout of the Boston Braves. During the 1945 season, Cuccinello hit .308 for the Chicago White Sox, and just missed winning the American League batting title, one point behind Snuffy Stirnweiss' .309. Nevertheless, he was released in the offseason. In a 15-season career, Cuccinello was a .280 hitter with 94 home runs and 884 RBI in 1704 games.

John Stephen DeMerit (born January 8, 1936 in West Bend, Wisconsin) is an American former professional baseball player from Port Washington, Wisconsin. He was an outfielder over parts or all of five seasons (1957–1959; 1961–1962) with the Milwaukee Braves and New York Mets. Nicknamed "Thumper", An alumnus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, he signed a $100,000 bonus contract with his hometown Braves in 1957. Under the bonus rule then in force, the Braves were required to keep DeMerit on their big-league roster for all of 1957. DeMerit got into 33 games, six as a starting outfielder, but collected only five singles in 34 at bats. Still, Milwaukee won the National League pennant and drew the New York Yankees as their opponents in the 1957 World Series. DeMerit appeared in one contest, as a pinch runner for veteran catcher Del Rice in the eighth inning of Game 3. He failed to score a run and the Braves fell, 12–3. But they outlasted the Yankees in seven games to become world champions. A change in the bonus rule allowed the Braves to send DeMerit to the minor leagues in 1958, and DeMerit spent most of 1958 and 1959 and all of 1960 in the higher reaches of the Milwaukee farm system. Then in 1961, he spent his only full year in the major leagues. He appeared in only 34 games and hit a poor .162 with 12 hits, but those dozen included his first two MLB home runs, hit off five-time All-Star Larry Jackson April 26 and future Baseball Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax September 15.

Elwood George English (March 2, 1906 – September 26, 1997) was an American professional baseball shortstop and third baseman. He played twelve seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1927 and 1938 for the Chicago Cubs and Brooklyn Dodgers. His uncle Paul Carpenter also played professional baseball.

Cecil Grant Fielder is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. Fielder was a power hitter in the 1980s and 1990s. He attended college at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He played in the MLB for the Tigers, Yankees, Angels and Indians. With the Yankees , he won the 1996 World Series over the Atlanta Braves. In 1990, he became the first player to reach the 50-home run mark since George Foster hit 52 for the Cincinnati Reds in 1977, and the first American League player to do so since Roger Maris famously hit 61 inn 1961.

George Arthur Foster is a former professional baseball outfielder, who played in Major League Baseball from 1969 to 1986. One of the most feared right-handed sluggers of his era, he was key piece of the Cincinnati Reds "Big Red Machine" that won consecutive World Series in 1975 and 1976. Foster led the National League in home runs in 1977 and 1978. and in RBIs in 1976, 1977, and 1978. He won the NL's MVP Award 1n 1977, and a Silver Slugger Award in 1981.

Juan Alberto Gonzalez Vasquez is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. During his 16 years in the league, Gonzalez played for four teams, but is most identified with the Texas Rangers baseball club. One of the premier run producers and most feared hitters of the 1990s and early 2000s, Gonzalez hit over 40 home runs five times and at least 100 RBI eight times. He also had a batting average of .310 or higher in five seasons. In his career as a whole, Gonzalez averaged 42 home runs and 135 RBI per 162 games, placing him well within the top ten all-time in these season-adjusted statistics.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

Ronald Ames Guidry (born August 28, 1950), nicknamed "Louisiana Lightning" and "Gator", is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) left-handed pitcher who played his entire 14-year career for the New York Yankees of the American League (AL). Guidry was also the pitching coach of the Yankees from 2006 to 2007. Guidry's major league career began in 1975. He was a member of World Series-winning Yankees teams in 1977 and 1978. He won the AL Cy Young Award in 1978, winning 25 games and losing only 3. He also won five Gold Glove Awards and appeared in four All-Star games. Guidry served as captain of the Yankees beginning in 1986; he retired from baseball in 1989. In 2003, the Yankees retired Guidry's uniform number (49) and dedicated a plaque to him in Monument Park.

Harry Leroy "Roy" Halladay III (May 14, 1977 - November 7, 2017) threw the second no-hitter in the history of postseason play (Game 1 of the 2010 NLDS against the Cincinnati Reds), just over three months after throwing the 20th perfect game in Major League Baseball history. The Toronto Blue Jays drafted Roy with the 17th overall pick of the 1995 MLB June Amateur Draft and he debuted three years later in 1998 in two games, the second of which was a no-hitter broken up by a two-out home run in the top of the ninth. Early in his career with the Jays, Halladay tried to overpower batters, but showed little movement on his pitches making them easily recognizable and extremely hittable. By making some adjustments in the minor leagues, Roy became one of the most controlled and consistent pitchers in the American League. From 2002-2011, Doc Halladay, nicknamed after the feared gunslinger of the Old West, won ten or more games nine times and topped the 20-win mark three times. He earned his first of eight All-Star Game selections in 2002 and won his first of two AL Cy Young Awards in 2003, the other in 2010. In 2011, Roy finished second in NL Cy Young voting behind Los Angeles’ Clayton Kershaw. Roy was notorious for pitching deep into games, leading the league seven times in complete games, four times in innings pitched and five times in strikeout-to-walk ratio. Halladay pitched 16 years in the Major Leagues with the Blue Jays (1998-2009) and the Philadelphia Phillies (2010-2013) and posted a 203-105 record with 2,117 strikeouts and a 3.38 career ERA. He has added 67 complete games, 20 shutouts and 390 starts in 416 game appearances. He was killed on November 7, 2017, when his plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico. Roy Halladay was named a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

Harry Aloysius Hanebrink (November 12, 1927 – September 9, 1996) was a backup second baseman/left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Milwaukee Braves (1953, 1957–1958) and Philadelphia Phillies (1959). Listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 165 lb., Hanebrink batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He was born in Saint Louis, Missouri. In a four-season career, Hanebrink was a .224 hitter (71-for-317) with six home runs and 25 RBI in 177 games, including seven doubles, two triples and one stolen base. He also was a member of the Braves team that lost the 1958 World Series to the New York Yankees. Hanebrink died in Bridgeton, Missouri, at the age of 68.

Frank Oliver Howard, nicknamed "Hondo", The Washington Monument" and "The Capitol Punisher", is a former All-Star outfielder, coach and manager in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Washington Senators/Texas Ranger franchises. One of the most physically intimidating players in the sport, the 6 ft. 7 in. Howard would typically tip the scales at between 275 and 290 pounds, according to former Senators/Rangers trainer Bill Ziegler. Howard was named the NLs Rookie of the Year in 1960, and went on to twice lead the American League in home runs and total bases and in slugging average, RBI and walks once each. His 382 career home runs were the eighth most by a right-handed hitter when he retired; his 237 home runs and 1969 totals of 48 HRs and 340 total bases in a Washington uniform are a record for any of that city's several franchises.

Derek Sanderson Jeter is a former professional baseball shortstop, current businessman and baseball executive who is the chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball. As a shortstop, Jeter spent his entire 20-year MLB playing career with the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, base running, fielding and leadership. His is the Yankees all0-time career leader in hits, doubles, games played, stolen bases, times on base, plate appearances and at bats. His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter was the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and first among shortstops. In 2017, the Yankees retired his uniform number 2.

Thomas Edward John Jr. (born May 22, 1943) is a retired American professional baseball pitcher who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 26 seasons between 1963 and 1989. He played for the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees, California Angels, and Oakland Athletics. He was a four-time MLB All-Star. John's 288 career victories rank as the seventh-highest total among left-handers in major league history. He had 188 career no decisions, an all-time MLB record among starting pitchers (dating back to at least 1908).[1] He is also known for the surgical procedure ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction, nicknamed "Tommy John surgery", which he underwent in 1974 after damaging the ligament in his throwing arm.[2] John was the first pitcher to receive the operation, and despite a poor outlook initially, he returned to being an effective pitcher, as more than half of his career wins came after his surgery. It since become a common procedure among baseball pitchers. service with the United States Merchant Marine in 1944 and 1945, Keller returned as a regular with the Yankees for the 1946 season. He collected 30 home runs, 29 doubles, and 10 triples, the second of his two 30-20-10 seasons.

Charles Ernest Keller (September 12, 1916 – May 23, 1990) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball from 1939 through 1952 for the New York Yankees (1939–43, 1945–49, 1952) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). A native of Middletown, Maryland, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed. His ability to hit massive wall reaching fly balls, and home runs, earned him the nickname "King Kong". A splendid all-round athlete at the University of Maryland, where he earned a degree in agricultural economics in 1937, Keller joined the Yankees in 1939 and quickly became the regular left fielder, with Tommy Henrich patrolling right field and Joe DiMaggio in center field. For much of ten American League seasons, Keller, DiMaggio, and Henrich formed one of the best-hitting outfields in baseball history. Through much of his career, Keller was a feared slugger and a competent fielder. In his rookie season he hit .334 with 11 home runs and 83 RBI in 111 games. He hit three homers and batted .438 as the Yankees swept four games from the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series. In his second MLB season, Keller hit .286 with 21 home runs, 93 RBI, 18 doubles and a career-high 15 triples. His most productive season came in 1941, when he hit .298 and posted career-highs in home runs (33) and RBI (122), while also hitting 10 triples and 24 doubles, making it his first 30-20-10 season. In 1942, he scored over 100 runs and walked over 100 times for the third straight season, slashing .292/.417/.513/.930, while also stealing a career-high 14 bases. Following service with the United States Merchant Marine in 1944 and 1945, Keller returned as a regular with the Yankees for the 1946 season. He collected 30 home runs, 29 doubles, and 10 triples, the second of his two 30-20-10 seasons.

David Arthur Kingman, nicknamed "King Kong" and "Sky King" is a former Major League Baseball left fielder, first baseman, third baseman, and designated hitter who was a 3 time MLB All-Star with 442 career home runs and 1,210 RBI in 16 seasons. The 6'6" Kingman was a powerful hitter who twice led the National League in home runs. Kingman hit one measured at over 530 feet. He also struck out frequently, and usually posted a low batting average and on-base percentage. His 1,816 strikeouts was the fourth-highest total in MLB history at the time of his retirement. As a result of the increase in frequency of strikeouts in the intervening period, he currently ranks fifteenth as of 2015. Kingman finished in he top 25 voting for NL MVP four times and AL MVP once.

John Logan, Jr. (March 23, 1926 – August 9, 2013) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. Logan was signed by the Boston Braves in 1947, having been discovered by Braves scout Dewey Briggs. He was a four-time All-Star and led the National League in doubles in 1955. Logan was the first major league batter Sandy Koufax faced; Logan hit a bloop single. In a 13-season career, Logan was a lifetime .268 batter with 93 home runs and 547 RBIs in 1503 games. He has a total of 651 career runs scored and 19 stolen bases. He accumulated 216 doubles and 41 triples with a total of 1407 hits in 5244 career at bats. Afer his major league career, Logan played one season in Japan for the Nankai Hawks in 1964. Logan grew up in Endicott, New York and attended Union-Endicott High School, where he was a five-sport star. Endicott has a little league field named after him, "Johnny Logan Field." Johnny Logan was of Russian and Croatian descent. His father John Sr., was from Tsaritsyn, now Volgograd, and his mother, Helen Senko, was born in Croatia, but also lived in the borderland of Poland. Logan died at a hospital in Milwaukee on August 9, 2013, age 87.

Edmund Walter Lopat (June 21, 1918 – June 15, 1992) was a Major League Baseball pitcher, coach, manager, front office executive, and scout. He was sometimes known as "The Junk Man", but better known as "Steady Eddie", a nickname later given to Eddie Murray. He was born in New York City. A left-hander, Lopat made his Major League pitching debut on April 30, 1944, playing for the Chicago White Sox. He was traded to the New York Yankees on February 24, 1948 for Aaron Robinson, Bill Wight, and Fred Bradley. From 1948 to 1953 he was the third of the "Big Three" of the Yankees' pitching staff, together with Allie Reynolds and Vic Raschi. He pitched in the All-Star Game in 1951 for the American League. In 1953 he led the AL in both earned-run average and won/lost percentage. On July 30, 1955, Lopat was traded to the Baltimore Orioles for Jim McDonald and cash, finishing out the season and retiring. Over his 12-year AL career, Lopat won 166 games, losing 112 (.597) with an ERA of 3.21. He was also adept with the bat, compiling a .211 batting average with 5 home runs and 77 RBI in his career.

Luzinski was a well-liked member of the Phillies and a feared slugger who could also hit for average despite striking out frequently. While he was a poor defensive left fielder, he hit .300 or better for three consecutive seasons during the prime of his career, and was a career .276 hitter with 307 home runs and 1,128 RBI. He was selected an All-Star between 1975 and 1978, hitting a home run off Jim Palmer in 1977 and being the top vote-getter for the NL in 1978. He was also MVP runner-up in 1975 (when he led the NL in RBIs with 120) and 1977, when he posted career highs in batting average (.309), home runs (39) and RBIs (130).

Félix Mantilla Lamela (born July 29, 1934 in Isabela, Puerto Rico) is a former Major League Baseball player. In his 11-year career, Mantilla played for the Milwaukee Braves (1956–61), New York Mets (1962), Boston Red Sox (1963–65) and Houston Astros (1966). An infielder and outfielder, he played second base the majority of his career (326 games). He also played shortstop (180 games), third base (143), the outfield (156) and, in the latter part of his career, first base (16). He batted and threw right-handed. Mantilla and two other black players joined the Jacksonville Braves of the Class-A South Atlantic League in 1953. This was one of the first two integrated baseball teams in the Southern United States. During this time Mantilla was the roommate of Hank Aaron. Mantilla and Aaron were both called up to the major leagues, playing for the Milwaukee Braves. Both were on the team when they won the World Series title in 1957. He was selected by the New York Mets in the expansion draft and became their most regular third baseman in 1962, establishing career highs in batting average, home runs and RBI (.275, 11 and 59 respectively). At the end of the season he was traded to the Red Sox for three players, two of whom were Pumpsie Green and Tracy Stallard. Mantilla's numbers improved dramatically in the hitter-friendly Fenway Park: he hit .315 in 66 games in 1963, hit .289 with 30 home runs in 1964 (five fewer than he had hit in his career prior to that season), and set a career high with 92 RBIs in 1965. During this latter year, he was also named to the American League All-Star team for the only time in his career. Prior to the start of the 1966 season, the Red Sox traded Mantilla to the Houston Astros for Eddie Kasko. He spent that year as a utility player before being released on November 28. The Chicago Cubs signed Mantilla as a free agent before the start of the 1967 season; however, during spring training he suffered an Achilles tendon injury that required surgery.[2] He never played a game for them and was released on July 6. He went to spring training with the Cubs in 1968 as a non-roster player; at the end of camp the Cubs signed him to a minor league contract,[3] but he never appeared in another professional game. A lifetime .261 hitter, Mantilla compiled 89 home runs with 330 runs batted in. On May 26, 1959, in the 13th inning of a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Milwaukee County Stadium, Mantilla ruined Harvey Haddix's bid for a perfect game. Leading off the inning, he hit a ground ball to third baseman Don Hoak, whose throw to first pulled Rocky Nelson off the bag for an error.[4] (Mantilla had not even been in the starting lineup; he entered the game in the 11th after Del Rice had pinch-hit for Johnny O'Brien.) Mantilla was sacrificed to second by Eddie Mathews, followed by an intentional walk to Hank Aaron. The following batter, Joe Adcock, hit one over the right-center field wall, just beyond the reach of right fielder Joe Christop

Alfred Manuel Martin Jr. (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989), commonly called "Billy", was an American Major League Baseball second baseman and manager who, in addition to leading other teams, was five times the manager of the New York Yankees. First known as a scrappy infielder who made considerable contributions to the championship Yankee teams of the 1950s, he then built a reputation as a manager who would initially make bad teams good, before ultimately being fired amid dysfunction. In each of his stints with the Yankees he managed them to winning records before being fired by team owner George Steinbrenner or resigning under fire, usually amid a well-publicized scandal such as Martin's involvement in an alcohol-fueled fight. Martin was born in a working-class section of Berkeley, California. His skill as a baseball player gave him a route out of his home town. Signed by the Pacific Coast League Oakland Oaks, Martin learned much from Casey Stengel, the man who would manage him both in Oakland and in New York, and enjoyed a close relationship with him. Martin's spectacular catch of a wind-blown Jackie Robinson popup late in Game Seven of the 1952 World Series saved that series for the Yankees, and he was the hitting star of the 1953 World Series, earning the Most Valuable Player award in the Yankee victory. He missed most of two seasons, 1954 and 1955, after being drafted into the Army, and his abilities never fully returned; the Yankees traded him after a brawl at the Copacabana club in New York during the 1957 season. Martin bitterly resented being traded, and did not speak to Stengel for years, a time during which Martin completed his playing career, appearing with a series of also-ran baseball teams. The last team for whom Martin played, the Minnesota Twins, gave him a job as a scout, and he spent most of the 1960s with them, becoming a coach in 1965. After a successful managerial debut with the Twins' top minor league affiliate, the Denver Bears, Martin was made Twins manager in 1969. He led the club to the American League West title, but was fired after the season. He then was hired by a declining Detroit Tigers franchise in 1971, and led the team to an American League East title in 1972 before being fired by the Tigers late in the 1973 season. He was quickly hired by the Texas Rangers, and turned them for a season (1974) into a winning team, but was fired amid conflict with ownership in 1975. He was almost immediately hired by the Yankees. As Yankee manager, Martin led the team to consecutive American League pennants in 1976 and 1977; the Yankees were swept in the 1976 World Series by the Cincinnati Reds but triumphed over the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games in the 1977 World Series.

Gilbert James McDougald (May 19, 1928 – November 28, 2010) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) infielder who spent ten major league seasons playing for the New York Yankees from 1951 through 1960. McDougald was the 1951 American League (AL) Rookie of the Year. He was an All-Star for five seasons, and was a member of eight American League pennant-winning teams and five World Series champion teams. He was known for hitting a line drive that severely injured pitcher Herb Score's right eye during a game at Municipal Stadium in 1957.

Frederick Stanley McGriff is a former professional baseball first baseman, who played for six Major League Baseball teams from 1986 through 2004. A power hitting first baseman, he became a five-time All-Star and led both leagues in home runs in separate years - the AL in 1989 and the NL in 1992. McGriff finished his career with 493 home runs, tied with Hall of Fame player Lou Gehrig and only seven homers away from joining g the 500 home run club. He won a World Series title as a first baseman with the Atlanta Braves in 1995. He currently works in the Atlanta Braves front office as Special Assistant to Baseball; Operations.

Bobby Ray Murcer (May 20, 1946 – July 12, 2008) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played for 17 seasons between 1965 and 1983, mostly with the New York Yankees, whom he later rejoined as a longtime broadcaster. A Gold Glove winner and five-time All-Star, Murcer led the American League in on-base percentage in 1971, and in runs and total bases in 1972. Bobby Ray Murcer (May 20, 1946 – July 12, 2008) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played for 17 seasons between 1965 and 1983, mostly with the New York Yankees, whom he later rejoined as a longtime broadcaster. A Gold Glove winner and five-time All-Star, Murcer led the American League in on-base percentage in 1971, and in runs and total bases in 1972.

Dale Bryan Murphy is a former professional baseball player. During an 18-year baseball career in Major League Baseball, he played as an outfielder, catcher, and first baseman for three teams, but is best noted for his time with the Atlanta Braves. In MLB's National League, Murphy won consecutive MVP Awards , the Silver Slugger Award for four straight years, and the Gold Glove Award for five straight years. He is a member of the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame, Georgia Sports Hall of Fame, and World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame.

Graig Nettles (born August 20, 1944), nicknamed "Puff", is an American former Major League Baseball third baseman. During a 22-year baseball career, he played for the Minnesota Twins (1967–1969), Cleveland Indians (1970–1972), New York Yankees (1973–1983), San Diego Padres (1984–1986), Atlanta Braves (1987), and Montreal Expos (1988). Nettles was one of the best defensive third basemen of all time, and despite his relatively low career batting average, he was an excellent offensive contributor, setting an American League record for career home runs by a third baseman. As a part of four pennant-winning Yankee teams, Nettles enjoyed his best season in 1977 when he won the Gold Glove Award and had career-highs in home runs (37) and runs batted in (107) in leading the Yankees to the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Paul Andrew O'Neill (born February 25, 1963) is a retired right fielder and Major League Baseball player, and current lead game analyst and color commentator for the New York Yankees on the YES Network. In his career, he won five World Series championships while playing for the Cincinnati Reds (1985–1992) and New York Yankees (1993–2001). In a 17-year career, O'Neill compiled 281 home runs, 1,269 runs batted in, 2,107 hits, and a lifetime batting average of .288. O'Neill won the American League batting title in 1994 with a .359 average and was a five-time All-Star in 1991, 1994, 1995, 1997 and 1998. O'Neill is the only player to have played on the winning team in three perfect games. He was in right field for the Reds for Tom Browning's perfect game in 1988. He caught the final out (a fly ball) in the Yankees' David Wells' perfect game in 1998, and he made a diving catch in right field and doubled to help the Yankees win David Cone's perfect game in 1999. After his retirement as a baseball player, O'Neill became a broadcaster on the YES Network.

Andrew Pafko (February 25, 1921 – October 8, 2013) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs (1943–51), Brooklyn Dodgers (1951–52), and Milwaukee Braves (1953–59). He batted and threw right-handed and played center field. Pafko was born in Boyceville, Wisconsin. In his 17-year MLB career, he was an All-Star for four seasons and was a .285 hitter with 213 home runs and 976 RBI, in 1852 games. In 1999, he was named to the Chicago Cubs All-Century Team. In 1941, Pafko played on the Green Bay Blue Sox team in the Wisconsin State League. He had 12 home runs, 66 RBIs, while batting .349 on the team that won the league championship. He played another season in the minor league before debuting in the major league in 1943 with the Chicago Cubs. Nicknamed "Handy Andy", Pafko was a popular player well known for good hitting and fielding, and contributed to championship-caliber teams in three different cities. He played for the Chicago Cubs during their 1945 World Series appearance. After Cubs third baseman Stan Hack retired the following year, Pafko replaced him at third base long enough to be almost named an All-Star there. MLB cancelled the All-Star Game and selection that season due to the war and the Associated Press sportswriters named Pafko as one of their All-Stars. Pafko did become a four-time consecutive All-Star from 1947 through 1950, making him one of the few players to achieve All-Star status in both the infield and outfield. Pafko was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers in June 1951 during the middle of the season; he was the left fielder when Bobby Thomson hit the "Shot Heard 'Round the World." Pafko returned home when he was traded to the Boston Braves before the start of the 1953 season, becoming the only Wisconsin native on the Braves roster when they arrived in Milwaukee and participating in their strong contending teams there, including the 1957 World Series champions. Pafko started in the first game at Milwaukee County Stadium on April 3, 1953. A devout Slovak Lutheran, he was an instant favorite with Milwaukee's large Eastern European community. In the mid-1950s, the Milwaukee area Lutherans had an "Andy Pafko Night" and gave him a new car.

Rafeal Palmeiro Corrales, is a Major League Baseball first baseman and left fielder for the Cleburne Railroaders of the American Association of Independent Professional Baseball. Palmeiro was an All-American at Mississippi State University before being drafted by the Chicago Cubs in 1985. He played for the Cubs (1986-1988), Texas Rangers (1989-1993), and the Baltimore Orioles (1994-1998, 2004-2005). He was named to the MLB All-Star Team four times, and won the Gold Glove three times. He is a member of the 500 home run club and the 3,000 hit club and is one of only six players in history to be a member of both. Days after recording his 3,000th hit, Palmeiro received a 10-game suspension for testing positive for an anabolic steroid.

Andrew Eugene Pettitte (born June 15, 1972) is an American former baseball starting pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily for the New York Yankees. He also pitched for the Houston Astros. Pettitte won five World Series championships with the Yankees and was a three-time All-Star. He ranks as MLB's all-time postseason wins leader with 19. Pettitte was drafted by the Yankees organization in 1990, and he signed with them roughly a year later. After debuting in the major leagues in 1995, Pettitte finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year Award. In 1996, he led the AL with 21 wins and was runner-up for the AL Cy Young Award, and two years later, he was named the Yankees' Opening Day starter. Pettitte established himself as one of the "Core Four" players who contributed to the Yankees' late-1990s dynasty that produced four championships. Pettitte won the 2001 American League Championship Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in helping his team win the pennant. After spending nine seasons with the Yankees—a stint in which he won at least 12 games each season—Pettitte signed with the Astros in 2004. He rejoined the Yankees in 2007 and later that season admitted to using human growth hormone to recover from an elbow injury in 2002. Pettitte's second tenure with the team lasted six seasons, interrupted by a one-year retirement in 2011, and also produced a fifth World Series championship. Pettitte's pitching repertoire included a four-seam and cut fastball and several off-speed pitches such as a slider, curveball, and changeup. A left-handed pitcher, he had an exceptional pickoff move to first base, which allowed him to record 98 career pickoffs.

William Taylor Phillips (born June 18, 1933), nicknamed "T-Bone", is an American former professional baseball player, a left-handed pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1956–60 and in 1963 as a member of the Milwaukee Braves, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox. The Atlanta, Georgia, native stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 185 pounds (84 kg). Phillips entered pro baseball in 1951 and joined the Braves' organization in 1953. After spending 1954–55 in military service, he was recalled from Triple-A Wichita in June 1956, pitched effectively in relief, and then was added to the Milwaukee starting rotation in August. In five starts for the contending Braves, he won three, lost two, and threw three complete games. He then moved back into the bullpen for the stretch drive, which saw the Braves finish just short of the National League pennant, one game behind the Brooklyn Dodgers. Phillips' rookie season would be his best: he posted his only over-.500 win–loss record (5–3) and his lowest earned run average (2.26). The 1957 Braves would bring home Milwaukee's first NL pennant and World Series triumph, but Phillips slumped badly during the year. In 27 games and 73 innings pitched, he allowed 82 hits, 40 bases on balls and 45 earned runs; his ERA jumped to 5.55. He did not pitch in the World Series, won by the Braves in seven games over the New York Yankees.

Jorge Rafael Posada Villeta (born August 17, 1971) is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball catcher who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees. Posada produced strong offensive numbers for his position, recording a .273 batting average, 275 home runs, and 1,065 runs batted in (RBIs) during his career. A switch hitter, Posada was a five-time All-Star, won five Silver Slugger Awards, and was on the roster for four World Series championship teams. Drafted by the Yankees in 1990, Posada was originally an infielder before moving to catcher during his minor league career. He debuted in the major leagues in 1995, but it was not until 1998 that he found regular playing time. A solid-hitting catcher, Posada established himself as a mainstay in the Yankees lineup and as one of the "Core Four" players who contributed to the Yankees' winning seasons. In 2003, he finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award and became only the second Yankees catcher after Yogi Berra to hit 30 home runs in a season. Posada added one of his best seasons in 2007 at age 35 when he batted .338. Following a stint as designated hitter in 2011, he retired. Posada is only the fifth MLB catcher with at least 1,500 hits, 350 doubles, 275 home runs, and 1,000 RBIs in a career. From 2000 to 2011, he compiled more RBIs and home runs than any other catcher in baseball. He is the only MLB catcher to ever bat .330 or better with 40 doubles, 20 home runs, and 90 RBIs in a single season.

John Wesley "Boog" Powell is a former professional baseball first baseman and left fielder. He played in Major League Baseball for the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers between 1961 and 1977. He was with the Orioles World Champion teams in 1965 and 1970, the American League Campion teams in 1966, 1969, 1970 and 1971, and the American League East Division Champion teams in 1969, 1970, 1971, 1971 and 1974. The four-time All-Star won the American League MVP Award in 1970 and in 1964 posted a .606 slugging percentage to lead the American League.

Manuel Aristides Ramirez Onelcida is a former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball for parts of 19 seasons. He played with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago White Sox, and Tampa Bay Rays before playing one season in the Chinese Professional Baseball League. Ramirez is recognized for having great batting skill and power. He was a nine-time Silver Slugger and was one of 25 players to hit 500 career home runs. His 21 grand slams are third all-time, and his 29 postseason home runs are the most in MLB history. He appeared in 12 All-Star Games, with a streak of seven consecutive games beginning in 1998 that included every season that he played with the Red Sox.

Willie Larry Randolph (born July 6, 1954) is an American former Major League Baseball second baseman, coach, and manager. During an 18-year baseball career, he played from 1975 to 1992 for six different teams, most notably the New York Yankees with whom he won back-to-back world titles against the Los Angeles Dodgers. He has joined ESPN as a post-season baseball analyst, beginning in September 2013. Mainly, he appeared on Baseball Tonight and provided updates during Monday and Wednesday night September network telecasts. At the end of his playing career, he ranked fifth in major league history in games at second base (2,152), ninth in putouts (4,859), seventh in assists (6,336), eighth in total chances (11,429), and third in double plays (1,547). Upon retiring as a player, he joined the Yankees as a coach for 11 years. He later served as manager of the New York Mets from 2005 to June 2008, leading the Mets to a league-best record and NLCS in 2006.

Allie Pierce Reynolds (February 10, 1917 – December 26, 1994) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Reynolds pitched 13 years for the Cleveland Indians (1942–46) and New York Yankees (1947–54). A member of the Creek nation, Reynolds was nicknamed "Superchief". Reynolds attended Capitol Hill High School and the Oklahoma Agricultural & Mechanical College (A&M), where he was a multi-sport athlete. Henry Iba, baseball coach of the Oklahoma A&M baseball team, discovered Reynolds while he was practicing his javelin throws. After excelling at baseball and American football at Oklahoma A&M, Reynolds turned to professional baseball. During his MLB career, Reynolds had a 182–107 win–loss record, 3.30 earned run average, and 1,423 strikeouts. He was an All-Star and World Series champion for six seasons. In 1951, he won the Hickok Belt as the top American professional athlete of the year. He also has received consideration for induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, though he has not been elected.

Robert Clinton Richardson (born August 19, 1935) is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees from 1955 through 1966. Batting and throwing right-handed, he was a superb defensive infielder, as well as something of a clutch hitter, who played a large role in the Yankee baseball dynasty of his day. He is the only World Series MVP ever to be selected from the losing team. He wore the uniform number 1 for the majority of his career (1958–1966). Richardson debuted on August 5, 1955. He racked up 1,432 hits in his career, with a lifetime batting average of .266, 34 home runs and 390 RBIs. He won a Gold Glove at second base each year from 1961-65 (not until Robinson Canó in 2010 would another Yankee second baseman win a Gold Glove) while forming a top double play combination with shortstop and roommate Tony Kubek. With the light-hitting but superb-fielding Yankee third baseman Clete Boyer, Richardson and Kubek gave the Yankees arguably the best defensive infield in baseball. His most famous defensive play came at the end of the 1962 World Series, mentioned below, when Richardson made a clutch catch off a Willie McCovey line drive that prevented Willie Mays and Matty Alou from scoring the runs that would have beaten the Yankees and given the Series to the San Francisco Giants. Richardson's 12-year career statistics also include 643 runs scored and 73 stolen bases. He also had 196 doubles and 37 triples.

David Allan Righetti (born November 28, 1958) is an American professional baseball coach and former player. A left-handed pitcher, Righetti played in Major League Baseball from 1979 through 1995 for the New York Yankees, San Francisco Giants, Oakland Athletics, Toronto Blue Jays, and Chicago White Sox. He served as the pitching coach for the Giants from 2000-2017. His nickname is "Rags". Righetti began his career as a starting pitcher, but the Yankees converted him into a relief pitcher, using him as their closer, in 1984. He won the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year Award in 1981. As a starter, he threw a no-hitter on July 4, 1983. As a closer, he was twice named the AL Rolaids Relief Man of the Year and pitched in two MLB All-Star Games.