Autographs - The 10 Most Important Autographs in the Hobby (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Muhammad Ali is regarded by boxing commentators and historians as one of the greatest professional boxers of all time. The Ring, a prominent boxing magazine, named him number one in a 1998 ranking of greatest heavyweights from all eras. In 1999, The Associated Press voted Ali the number one heavyweight of the 20th century. In 1999, Ali was named the second greatest boxer in history, pound for pound, by ESPN; behind only welterweight and middleweight legend Sugar Ray Robinson. In December 2007, ESPN listed Ali second in its choice of the greatest heavyweights of all time, behind Joe Louis.

The '55 Pirates would finish the season in last place in the National League. But things were looking good as a young player named Roberto Clemente would join the team on April 17th. With Clemente on the roster, they would be 5 years away from a World Series victory! Elected 1973.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Baseball's "Iron Horse," Lou Gehrig teamed with Babe Ruth to form the sport's most devastating tandem. A "Gibraltar in cleats," Gehrig posted 13 consecutive seasons with 100 runs scored and 100 RBI, averaging 141 runs and 149 RBI. The two-time American League Most Valuable Player set an AL mark with 185 RBI in 1931, hit a record 23 career grand slams and won the 1934 Triple Crown. His .361 batting average in seven World Series led the New York Yankees to six titles. A true gentleman and a tragic figure, Gehrig's consecutive games played streak ended at 2,130 when he was sidelined by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a disease that now bears his name. Elected 1939.

Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963), also known by his initials, MJ, is an American former professional basketball player who is the principal owner and chairman of the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played 15 seasons in the NBA for the Chicago Bulls and Washington Wizards. His biography on the official NBA website states: "By acclamation, Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time." He was one of the most effectively marketed athletes of his generation and was considered instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s. Jordan played three seasons for coach Dean Smith at the University of North Carolina. As a freshman, he was a member of the Tar Heels' national championship team in 1982. Jordan joined the Bulls in 1984 as the third overall draft pick. He quickly emerged as a league star and entertained crowds with his prolific scoring. His leaping ability, demonstrated by performing slam dunks from the free throw line in Slam Dunk Contests, earned him the nicknames Air Jordan and His Airness. He also gained a reputation for being one of the best defensive players in basketball. In 1991, he won his first NBA championship with the Bulls, and followed that achievement with titles in 1992 and 1993, securing a "three-peat". Although Jordan abruptly retired from basketball before the beginning of the 1993–94 NBA season, and started a new career in Minor League Baseball, he returned to the Bulls in March 1995 and led them to three additional championships in 1996, 1997, and 1998, as well as a then-record 72 regular-season wins in the 1995–96 NBA season. Jordan retired for a second time in January 1999, but returned for two more NBA seasons from 2001 to 2003 as a member of the Wizards. Jordan's individual accolades and accomplishments include six NBA Finals Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten scoring titles (both all-time records), five MVP Awards, ten All-NBA First Team designations, nine All-Defensive First Team honors, fourteen NBA All-Star Game selections, three All-Star Game MVP Awards, three steals titles, and the 1988 NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award. He holds the NBA records for highest career regular season scoring average (30.12 points per game) and highest career playoff scoring average (33.45 points per game). In 1999, he was named the greatest North American athlete of the 20th century by ESPN, and was second to Babe Ruth on the Associated Press' list of athletes of the century. Jordan is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, having been enshrined in 2009 for his individual career, and again in 2010 as part of the group induction of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team"). He became a member of the FIBA Hall of Fame in 2015.

An overpowering left-hander, Sandy Koufax enjoyed a six-year stretch as perhaps the most dominating pitcher in the game's history. Koufax captured five straight ERA titles and set a modern record with 382 strikeouts in 1965. His fastball and devastating curve enabled him to pitch no-hitters in four consecutive seasons, including a perfect game in 1965. He posted a 0.95 ERA in four World Series, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers to three championships. Hall of Fame slugger Willie Stargell once said: "Trying to hit (Koufax) was like trying to drink coffee with a fork." Elected 1972.

"You're going to be a great player, kid," said Jackie Robinson to Mickey Mantle after the 1952 World Series. Mantle was a star from the start,; his talent and boyish good looks earned him iconic status. Despite a series of devastating injuries, Mantle accumulated a long list of impressive accomplishments, finishing his 18-year career with 536 home runs and a .298 batting average. When healthy, Mantle was an excellent defensive outfielder - lightning fast, with a strong and accurate arm. The switch-hitter won three MVP Awards and a Triple Crown, contributing to 12 pennants and seven World Series titles for the New York Yankees, all while establishing numerous Fall Classic records. Elected 1974.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962

Still an American icon decades after his death, George Herman "Babe" Ruth emerged from humble beginnings to become the game's greatest slugger and gate attraction. Ruth hit home runs at a prodigious rate - his single season output often exceeded those of entire major league teams. He retired with 714 career home runs, at a time when only tow other players had reached 300. He also posted a record of 94-46 in 163 games as a pitcher, most coming before he became a regular in the outfield. Reggie Jackson once deflected a comparison to "The Sultan of Swat," saying, "There will never be another Babe Ruth. He was the greatest home run hitter who ever lived." Elected 1936.

Eldrick Tont "Tiger" Woods (born December 30, 1975) is an American professional golfer. He ranks second in both major championships and PGA Tour wins and also holds numerous records in golf. Woods is widely regarded as being one of the greatest golfers in the history of the sport. Following an outstanding junior, college, and amateur golf career, Woods turned professional in 1996 at the age of 20. By the end of April 1997, he had won three PGA Tour events in addition to his first major, the 1997 Masters, which he won by 12 strokes in a record-breaking performance. He first reached the number one position in the world rankings in June 1997, less than a year after turning pro. Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, Woods was the dominant force in golf; he was the top-ranked golfer in the world from August 1999 to September 2004 (264 weeks) and again from June 2005 to October 2010 (281 weeks). During this time, he won thirteen of golf's major championships. The next decade of Woods' career was marked by multiple comebacks from both personal problems and injuries. He took a self-imposed hiatus from professional golf from December 2009 to early April 2010 in an attempt to resolve marital issues with his estranged wife Elin. His many alleged extramarital indiscretions were revealed by several women through worldwide media sources, and the couple eventually divorced. Woods fell to number 58 in the world rankings in November 2011, before ascending to once again reach the No.1 ranking between March 2013 and May 2014. However, Woods' personal problems persisted outside of golf; injuries led him to undergo four back surgeries in 2014, 2015 and 2017. He competed in only one tournament between August 2015 and January 2018; this led him to drop out of the rankings of the world's top 1,000 golfers. On his return to regular competition, Woods made steady progress to the top of the game, winning his first tournament in five years at the Tour Championship in September 2018 and his first major in eleven years at the 2019 Masters. Woods has broken numerous golf records. He has been World Number One for the most consecutive weeks and for the greatest total number of weeks of any golfer. He has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record eleven times and has won the Byron Nelson Award for lowest adjusted scoring average a record eight times. Woods has the record of leading the money list in ten different seasons. He has won 15 professional major golf championships (trailing only Jack Nicklaus, who leads with 18) and 81 PGA Tour events (second all time behind Sam Snead, who won 82). Woods leads all active golfers in career major wins and career PGA Tour wins. He is the youngest player to achieve the career Grand Slam, and is only the second golfer (after Nicklaus) to have achieved a career Grand Slam three times. Woods has won 18 World Golf Championships