Sports - 1947 All Star Game (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Manning the Chicago White Sox shortstop position throughout his 20-year career, Luke Appling proved to be a consistent fielder, solid batter and fan favorite. As a leadoff hitter, he was known for his ability to intentionally foul off pitches until hitting the pitch he wanted. Appling twice captured American League batting titles and finished with a .310 lifetime batting average. He collected 2,749 career hits. The seven-time All-Star also was selected as the Chicago White Sox's greatest player by Chicago fans in 1969. Elected 1964.

Ewell Blackwell (October 23, 1922 – October 29, 1996) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Whip" for his sidearm, snap-delivery, Blackwell played for the Cincinnati Reds for most of his career (1942; 1946–52). He also played with the New York Yankees (1952–53) and finished his career with the Kansas City Athletics (1955). The 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), 195 lb (88 kg) Blackwell is considered to have been one of the greatest pitchers of his era, and starred in a six-year streak in the All-Star Game from 1946 through 1951. He was the winning pitcher of the 1950 All-Star Game, getting Joe DiMaggio to ground into a game-ending double play in the 14th inning. On June 18, 1947, Blackwell pitched a 6–0 no-hitter against the Boston Braves. In his next start, June 22, against the Brooklyn Dodgers, he took a no-hitter into the ninth inning, trying to tie the achievement of his veteran Reds teammate Johnny Vander Meer from nine years earlier, of throwing consecutive no-hitters. However, the no-hit attempt was broken up by Eddie Stanky. The Reds won the game 4–0. In a 10-season career, Blackwell posted an 82–78 record with 839 strikeouts and a 3.30 ERA in 1,321 innings pitched. In 1960, he was just the eighth player ever to be inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. During a 2007 New York Mets broadcast, Blackwell was referred to as the best right-handed pitcher ever by Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner. Both Kiner and Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella called Blackwell the toughest pitcher they ever faced. Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully also reported that batters were genuinely afraid to face him. Blackwell's best year was 1947, when he recorded 22 wins against 8 losses, including 16 consecutive complete game victories for a weak-hitting team. At a slender 6 ft 6 inches, he was one of the first very tall pitchers, and a fearsome sight to hitters of that era. His bizarre sidearm delivery, described by a leading sports pundit as "looking like a man falling out of a tree", put unusual strain on his arm, abbreviating his success and, ultimately, his career. Along with arm problems, Blackwell had his right kidney removed in January 1949 after it became infected, and then had an emergency appendectomy in September 1950.

A great all-around player, Lou Boudreau became the Cleveland Indians' regular shortstop in 1940, and two years later was named the team's player-manager, one of the youngest ever to hold such a position. He led Cleveland to the 1948 World Series championship and was named the American League Most Valuable Player. A four-time .300 hitter, Boudreau hit .295 for his career and led AL shortstops in fielding eight times. Boudreau will be remembered for inventing the "Williams shift," placing most of the fielders on the right side of the diamond against left handed Red Sox slugger Ted Williams. Elected 1970.

Ralph Theodore Joseph Branca (January 6, 1926 – November 23, 2016) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1944 through 1956. Branca played for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1944–1953, 1956), Detroit Tigers (1953–1954), and New York Yankees (1954). He was a three-time All-Star. In a 1951 playoff, Branca surrendered a walk-off home run to Bobby Thomson of the New York Giants; the game-winning hit was known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World". A three-time All-Star, Branca won 80 games for the Dodgers with a career-high 21 wins in 1947. In 1948, he was ninth in the league in wins (14) and won–lost percentage (.609). In 1949, he led the National League (NL) in won-lost percentage (.722). In 1951, he was tenth in the NL in ERA (3.26). In the final game of the best-of-three 1951 National League tie-breaker series at the Polo Grounds against the crosstown rival New York Giants, Branca entered the game in relief of Don Newcombe in the bottom of the ninth inning with one out and Whitey Lockman on second base and pinch runner Clint Hartung on third base and surrendered a walk-off home run, which became known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" to Bobby Thomson, giving the Giants the pennant. Prior to facing Thomson, Branca had been warming up in the bullpen with Carl Erskine. Dodgers coach Clyde Sukeforth noticed that Erskine was bouncing several curveballs in the dirt and instructed manager Charlie Dressen to call on Branca—this despite Thomson having homered off Branca in Game 1. A back injury suffered during spring training in 1952 limited Branca's effectiveness thereafter. Branca appeared in only 12 games for the Dodgers during the 1952 season. In the eighth inning of Game 7 of the 1952 World Series against the New York Yankees, Branca was ejected from the dugout by home plate umpire Larry Goetz for bench jockeying. Branca was only the second player in MLB history to be ejected from a World Series, and the first who was not actually in the game at the time. He did not make an appearance in the series. Branca began the 1953 season with Brooklyn, but was claimed off waivers by the Detroit Tigers on July 10, 1953. The Tigers released Branca in July 1954. After he pitched batting practice for the Yankees, the Yankees signed him, and used him in five games later in the season. Branca pitched for the Minneapolis Millers in 1955, but was released due to ineffectiveness caused by an arm injury.

Index Card BRECHEEN, HARRY MINT 9

Harry David Brecheen (October 14, 1914 – January 17, 2004), nicknamed "The Cat", was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the St. Louis Cardinals. In the late 1940s he was among the team's stars, in 1946 becoming the first left-hander ever to win three games in a single World Series, and the only pitcher ever to win consecutive World Series games. He later leading the National League in several categories in 1948. His career World Series earned run average of 0.83 was a major league record from 1946 to 1976. From 1951 to 1971 he held the Cardinals franchise record for career strikeouts by a left-hander, and he also retired with the fourth-highest fielding percentage among pitchers (.983), then the top mark among left-handers.

Philip Joseph Cavarretta (July 19, 1916 – December 18, 2010) was an American Major League Baseball first baseman, outfielder, and manager. He was known to friends and family as "Phil" and was also called "Philibuck", a nickname bestowed by Cubs manager Charlie Grimm. Cavarretta spent almost his entire baseball career with the Chicago Cubs. He was voted the 1945 National League Most Valuable Player after leading the Cubs to the pennant while winning the batting title with a .355 average. His 20 seasons (1934–1953) played for the Cubs is the second-most in franchise history, behind Cap Anson. He managed the Cubs in his final three seasons with the club. In his 22-year major league career covering 2,030 games, Cavaretta compiled a .293 batting average (1,977-for-6,754) with 990 runs, 347 doubles, 99 triples, 95 home runs, 920 RBI, 65 stolen bases, 820 bases on balls, .372 on-base percentage and .416 slugging percentage. He finished his career with a .989 fielding percentage playing at first base and all three outfield positions. In three World Series (1935,'38 and '45) he hit .317 (20-for-63) with 9 runs, 3 doubles, 1 home run, 5 RBI and 4 walks.

Spurgeon Ferdinand "Spud" Chandler (September 12, 1907 – January 9, 1990) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a right-handed starting pitcher and played his entire career for the New York Yankees from 1937 through 1947. He was named the American League's Most Valuable Player in 1943 after anchoring the team's pitching staff with 20 wins and only 4 losses as New York won its third consecutive pennant; his 1.64 earned run average in that season was the lowest by any major league pitcher between 1920 and 1967, and remains a Yankees team record. In eleven seasons, he never suffered a losing record; with a total of 109 wins and 43 losses, his career winning percentage of .717 is the highest of any pitcher with at least 100 victories since 1876.

William Walker Cooper (January 8, 1915 – April 11, 1991) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher from 1940 to 1957, most notably as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals with whom he won two World Series championships. An eight-time All-Star, Cooper was known as one of the top catchers in baseball during the 1940s and early 1950s.[2] His elder brother Mort Cooper, also played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher. In an eighteen-year major league career, Cooper played in 1,473 games, accumulating 1,341 hits in 4,702 at bats for a .285 career batting average along with 173 home runs, 812 runs batted in, and a .464 slugging percentage. He led National League catchers three times in range factor, twice in caught stealing percentage, and once in assists, finishing with a .977 career fielding percentage.[1] One of the sport's strongest players in his prime,[2][14] at the end of his career he ranked among the top five National League catchers in career batting average (.285), slugging average (.464), home runs (173) and runs batted in (812). He also batted .300 over three World Series with the St. Louis Cardinals from 1942 to 1944 as the team won two championships, and ranked tenth in National League history in both games (1,223) and putouts (5,166) behind the plate when he retired. During his career, he set a record by hitting grand slams with five different teams (a mark subsequently tied by Dave Kingman and Dave Winfield). His .464 slugging average then placed him behind only Roy Campanella (.500) and Gabby Hartnett (.489) among players with 1,000 National League games as a catcher, and his 173 HRs and 812 RBI put him behind only Campanella (242, 856), Hartnett (236, 1,179), and Ernie Lombardi (190, 990). His elder brother, Mort Cooper, was a National League pitcher and his teammate for the first few years of his career, while his son-in-law, Don Blasingame, also was a major leaguer

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.

Described by Hall of Famer Joe Cronin as "fine a man as ever wore a spike shoe," Bobby Doerr compiled a career .980 fielding percentage as the Boston Red Sox's second baseman for 14 seasons. Also a powerful hitter, he drove in 100 runs six times, with a high of 120 in 1950. Doerr once set an American League Record by handling 414 chances without an error and frequently led the circuit's second baseman in double plays, putouts and assists. Hall of Fame teammate Ted Williams called Doerr "the silent captain of the Red Sox." Elected 1986.

Robert Irving Elliott (November 26, 1916 – May 4, 1966) was an American third baseman and right fielder in Major League Baseball who played most of his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Braves. He also briefly managed and coached in the Majors. Elliott contributed some of the happiest memories to the Braves' final Boston years, winning the 1947 National League Most Valuable Player Award and earning the nickname "Mr. Team." The following season, his power hitting helped lift Boston to its second National League pennant of the 20th century, the team's first in 34 years, and last before relocating to Milwaukee. He was the second Major League third baseman to have five seasons of 100 runs batted in, joining Pie Traynor, and retired with the highest career slugging percentage (.440) of any NL third baseman. He also led the National League in assists three times and in putouts and double plays twice each, and ended his career among the NL leaders in games (8th, 1262), assists (7th, 2547), total chances (10th, 4113) and double plays (4th, 231) at third base.

When Bob Feller said of his pitching; "I just reared back and let them go," he accurately described his blazing fastball. "Rapid Robert" set the standard for generations of future fireballers. During his 18-year career - spent entirely with the Cleveland Indians - Feller amassed 266 victories, leading the league in wins six times and strikeouts seven. After enlisting in the Navy in 1941, he missed nearly four full seasons to serve his country. As a Navy gun captain, Feller earned five campaign ribbons studded with eight battle stars. Feller authored three no-hitters and 12 one-hitter, winning 20 or more games six times. Elected 1962.

Joseph "Flash" Gordon was a model of consistency throughout his 11-year major league career with the New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians. Gordon made his debut on April 18, 1938, and belted 25 home runs with a slugging percentage of .502 in his rookie season with the Yankees. He hit .322 in 1942 en route to the American League Most Valuable Player Award and was named to the AL All-Star team nine times. He hit 20-or-more home runs in seven seasons and drove in at least 100 runs four times. Gordon won four World Series titles with the Yankees and another with the Indians in 1948. Elected 2009.

Frank William Gustine (February 20, 1920 – April 1, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball player who appeared in three All-Star Games during his 12-season (1939–50) MLB career. He spent the bulk of his tenure (1,176 games played) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, though he also played a season for the Chicago Cubs and played the last nine games of his career with the 1950 St. Louis Browns. He also was a coach for the latter two months of that season for the Pirates. Gustine played all positions in the infield, spending most of his time at first and second base. He was selected to the All-Star game in 1946, 1947 and 1948. In 1,261 MLB games played, Gustine collected 1,214 hits, including 222 doubles and 47 triples. His best season was 1947, when he reached career highs in batting average (.297), hits (183), runs scored (102), and runs batted in (67).

Berthold John Haas (February 8, 1914 – June 23, 1999), was a professional baseball player who played first base in the Major Leagues from 1933 to 1951. He played for the Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago White Sox, and Philadelphia Phillies. In 1947, Haas was selected as a National League all-star. In 721 games over nine seasons, Haas posted a .264 batting average (644-for-2440) with 263 runs, 22 home runs, 263 RBI, 51 stolen bases and 204 bases on balls.

James Edward Hegan (August 3, 1920 – June 17, 1984) was an American professional baseball player, coach, and scout. He played for seventeen seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1941 to 1942 and 1946 to 1960, most notably for the Cleveland Indians with whom he won a World Series in 1948. Although Hegan was a light-hitting player, he was notable for being one of the best defensive catchers of his era and a capable handler of pitching staffs, earning five All-Star selections. After retiring as a player he continued to serve as a major league coach in a baseball career that spanned almost 40 years. Hegan would be the Indians starting catcher for 11 seasons from 1946 until 1956. In 1,666 games played, Hegan had a 1,087 hits for a .228 batting average, with 92 home runs and 525 runs batted in. During his career, he led American League catchers three times in putouts, assists, double plays, total chances per game and fielding percentage and, had a career fielding percentage of .990. At the time of his retirement in 1960, Hegan's .990 career fielding percentage was second only to Buddy Rosar among retired catchers. His 49.77% career caught stealing percentage ranks 16th all-time among major league catchers. Hegan caught 121 shutouts in his career, ranking him 9th all-time among major league catchers. He is the Indians' all-time leader in games played as a catcher with 1,491. As a testament to Hegan's pitch-calling skills during this period, the Indians' pitching staff was the best in baseball, leading the American League six times in earned run average. Hegan was selected to be an American League All-Star five times during his playing career. During his career, Hegan was the catcher for six twenty-game winning pitchers (Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Gene Bearden, Early Wynn, Mike Garcia, Herb Score) and, caught three no hitters by Don Black (1947), Bob Lemon (1948) and Bob Feller (1951). He caught for a record seven pitchers who would eventually be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Despite his considerable defensive skills, because he was a light-hitting player, Hegan is almost a forgotten man in major league baseball history. Yankee Hall of Fame catcher Bill Dickey once said about Hegan's fielding abilities, "If I had been able to catch like Hegan I wouldn't have needed to hit".

Thomas David Henrich (February 20, 1913 – December 1, 2009), nicknamed "The Clutch" and "Old Reliable", was an American professional baseball player of German descent. He played his entire Major League Baseball career as a right fielder and first baseman for the New York Yankees (1937–1942 and 1946–1950). Henrich led the American League in triples twice and in runs scored once, also hitting 20 or more home runs four times. He is best remembered for his numerous exploits in the World Series; he was involved in one of the most memorable plays in Series history in 1941, was the hitting star of the 1947 Series with a .323 batting average, and hit the first walk-off home run in Series history in the first game of the 1949 World Series. Oral Clyde Hildebrand (April 7, 1907 – September 8, 1977) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1931 to 1940. He played for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns, and New York Yankees. Hildebrand started his professional baseball career in 1930 with the American Association's Indianapolis Indians. In two seasons, he went just 14–18 but made it to the major leagues in late 1931. Hildebrand broke into the Cleveland Indians' starting rotation in 1933. That season, he went 16–11, led the American League in shutouts with six, and was selected to the All-Star team. He pitched a one-hitter on April 26.[7] From 1934 to 1936, he continued to pitch effectively for the Indians, going 30–28 in those years. Hildebrand also had several public disputes with manager Walter Johnson, which ended when Johnson was fired in 1935. In 1937, Hildebrand was traded to the Browns in a blockbuster deal. He struggled in two seasons with St. Louis and was then traded again, to the Yankees. In 1939, he went 10–4 with a career-low 3.06 earned run average, helping the Yankees win the AL pennant. He started game 4 of the World Series and pitched four shutout innings, as the Yankees clinched the title. Hildebrand went back to the minor leagues in 1941 and retired the following year.

William Russell Johnson (August 30, 1918 – June 20, 2006) was an American professional baseball player. He was a third baseman in Major League Baseball who played in 964 games for the New York Yankees in the 1940s and later with the St. Louis Cardinals. Johnson was born in Montclair, New Jersey, and debuted in 1943. He had an impressive rookie season which earned him 4th place in American League MVP voting. After missing 1944–1945 for wartime service in the United States Army, where he fought in the European Theater of Operations, he returned to MLB to spend the next five seasons as a regular third baseman. Nicknamed "Bull", Johnson was named an All-Star in 1947, and was a part of four championship teams in his six seasons as a regular. He was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1951 to allow Gil McDougald, a hot prospect for the Yankees, to play his position full-time. He served as the Cards' third baseman for two years before retiring during the 1953 season. In 964 games over nine seasons, Johnson posted a .271 batting average (882-for-3253) with 419 runs, 61 home runs, 487 RBI and 347 bases on balls. He finished his career with a .960 fielding percentage playing at third and first base. In 18 World Series games, he batted .237 (14-for-59) with 11 runs, 4 triples, 5 RBI and three walks.

George Kell worked diligently on all facets of the game to become a superb batter, sure-handed fielder and all around leader, culminating in a 1949 American League batting championship, when he beat out Ted Williams by .0002 and denied Williams his third Triple Crown. Kell batted .300 nine times and topped all AL third basemen in fielding percentage seven times, also pacing the circuit in double plays two times, assists four times and putouts twice. "You never stop watching, and you never stop learning." said Kell. Elected 1983.

Charles Ernest Keller (September 12, 1916 – May 23, 1990) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball from 1939 through 1952 for the New York Yankees (1939–43, 1945–49, 1952) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). A native of Middletown, Maryland, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed. His ability to hit massive wall reaching fly balls, and home runs, earned him the nickname "King Kong". A splendid all-round athlete at the University of Maryland, where he earned a degree in agricultural economics in 1937, Keller joined the Yankees in 1939 and quickly became the regular left fielder, with Tommy Henrich patrolling right field and Joe DiMaggio in center field. For much of ten American League seasons, Keller, DiMaggio, and Henrich formed one of the best-hitting outfields in baseball history. Through much of his career, Keller was a feared slugger and a competent fielder. In his rookie season he hit .334 with 11 home runs and 83 RBI in 111 games. He hit three homers and batted .438 as the Yankees swept four games from the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series. In his second MLB season, Keller hit .286 with 21 home runs, 93 RBI, 18 doubles and a career-high 15 triples. His most productive season came in 1941, when he hit .298 and posted career-highs in home runs (33) and RBI (122), while also hitting 10 triples and 24 doubles, making it his first 30-20-10 season. In 1942, he scored over 100 runs and walked over 100 times for the third straight season, slashing .292/.417/.513/.930, while also stealing a career-high 14 bases. Following service with the United States Merchant Marine in 1944 and 1945, Keller returned as a regular with the Yankees for the 1946 season. He collected 30 home runs, 29 doubles, and 10 triples, the second of his two 30-20-10 seasons.

John Henry Kramer (January 5, 1918 – May 18, 1995) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with four different teams between 1939 and 1951 Kramer pitched 16 seasons from 1936 to 1959, twelve in the major leagues and six in the minors. He entered the majors in 1939 with the St. Louis Browns, playing for them three years before joining the U.S. Navy Seabees during World War II. Following his service discharge, he rejoined the Browns in the 1943 midseason and later was demoted to the Toledo Mud Hens of the American Association. On September 11, he pitched a 5–0 no-hitter against the Louisville Colonels. He struggled with his control in his first four years (201 walks in 345.0 IP), but received a fifth chance in part to the World War II player shortage. He responded with a heroic effort that culminated in the Browns only World Series appearance. In a 12-season career, Kramer posted a 95–103 record with 613 strikeouts and a 4.24 ERA in 322 appearances, including 215 starts, 88 complete games, 14 shutouts, seven saves and 16371/3 innings of work. He also helped himself with the bat, hitting .144 (72-for-501) with five home runs and 39 RBI.

George John Kurowski (April 19, 1918 – December 9, 1999) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the St. Louis Cardinals (1941–49). Kurowski batted and threw right-handed. He debuted on September 23, 1941, and played his final game on October 1, 1949. In a nine-season career, Kurowski posted a .286 batting average with 106 home runs and 529 RBI in 916 games played. Kurowski's childhood nickname came from his already white hair. A native of Reading, Pennsylvania, Kurowski overcame several personal problems. Kurowski overcame childhood osteomyelitis, which forced the removal of part of a bone on his right forearm. Before he started his baseball career, his older brother died in a mine accident, and his father died from a heart attack during spring training in 1942. His most productive season came in 1947, when he posted career-highs in average (.310), home runs (27), RBI (104), runs (108), doubles (27), slugging % (.544) and on-base % (.420). An All-Star during five consecutive seasons (1943–47), Kurowski exceeded the 20 home run mark three times to set a major league record for a third baseman (1944–45, 1947), and hit over .300 three times (1945–47). He also led the National League three times in putouts, twice in fielding %, and once in double plays. In four World Series appearances, Kurowski hit .253 (21-for-83) with one home run and nine RBI in 23 games, as the Cardinals were World Champions in 1942, 1944 and 1946. His only home run in the Series, in 1942, off Red Ruffing, broke a 2–2 tie in the ninth inning of Game Five to clinch the title for St. Louis over the New York Yankees. He also appeared five times in the MVP ballot, in 1942 and from 1944 through 1947. In 1949, Kurowski developed arm and elbow problems and his playing career ended.

John Kelly Lewis (August 10, 1916 – February 18, 2011), better known as Buddy Lewis, was a third baseman/right fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Washington Senators (1935–41, 1945–47, 1949). In an 11-season career, Lewis posted a .297 batting average (1,563-for-5,261) with 71 home runs, 607 RBI, 830 runs, 249 doubles, 93 triples, 83 stolen bases and 573 bases on balls in 1,349 games played. He hit better than .300 four times.

Martin Whiteford "Mr. Shortstop" Marion (December 1, 1917 – March 15, 2011) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop and manager. Marion played for the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Browns between 1940 and 1953. He later became the manager of the Chicago White Sox. From 1940-50, Marion led the National League shortstops in fielding percentage four times, despite several other players being moved around the infield during these years. In 1941 he played all 154 games at shortstop (also a league-high) and in 1947 he made only 15 errors for a consistent .981 percentage. Marion was also a better-than-average hitter for a shortstop. His most productive season came in 1942, when he hit .276 with a league-leading 38 doubles. In the 1942 World Series, one of four series in which he participated with the Cardinals, he helped his team to a World Championship. In 1943 he batted a career-high .280 in the regular season and hit .357 in the 1943 World Series. He played with many second basemen throughout his career, including Frank "Creepy" Crespi. Marion commented after the 1941 season that Crespi's play was the best he ever saw by a second baseman. Crespi once took on Joe Medwick on the field (during a game) when he was trying to intimidate Marion. They remained friends until Crespi's death in 1990.

Philip Samuel Masi (January 6, 1916 – March 29, 1990) was an American professional baseball player.[1] From 1939 though 1952, he played in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Boston Braves (1939–1949), Pittsburgh Pirates (1949) and Chicago White Sox (1950–1952). Although he was known for being one of the best defensive catchers of his era, Masi was notable for his involvement in a controversial play that occurred during the 1948 World Series between the Boston Braves and the Cleveland Indians. In a fourteen-year major league career, Masi played in 1,229 games, accumulating 917 hits in 3,468 at bats for a .264 career batting average along with 47 home runs, 417 runs batted in and a .344 on-base percentage. Over his career, he committed only 72 errors in 4,257 chances for a career .983 fielding percentage. A four-time All-Star, he led National League catchers in fielding percentage twice and, American League catchers once. A fast running catcher, he collected 45 stolen bases in his career and was often used in pinch-running duties.

Edward Robert Miller (November 26, 1916 – July 31, 1997) was an American professional baseball player, a shortstop who played for 14 seasons in the National League between 1936 and 1950. He was a talented fielder and a perennial All-Star during the 1940s. Born in Pittsburgh, Miller made his Major League debut with the Cincinnati Reds in 1936 as a 19-year-old. He played in 41 games over 2 seasons with the Reds before being traded to the New York Yankees in 1938 in exchange for Willard Hershberger. Miller never played for the Yankees at the major league level and was subsequently traded to the Boston Bees less than a year later. He became the starting shortstop while in Boston, and established himself as one of the National League's best shortstops during his four seasons there. His first season with Boston was shortened when he fractured his ankle in a collision with Al Simmons. He recovered in 1940 to a career-best .276 for the Bees while leading all NL shortstops in fielding percentage and appearing in the MLB All-Star Game. While his batting average fell over the next two seasons with Boston, he led all shortstops in fielding percentage both years. He was an All-Star in 1941 and was named as a starter in the All-Star Game in 1942. After the 1942 season, he was traded back to the Reds in exchange for Eddie Joost and Nate Andrews. He spent five seasons as the Reds' starting shortstop and earned four more selections to the All-Star Game while with the club. He continued to play solid defense while with Cincinnati, and he led all shortstops in fielding on two further occasions. His final year with the Reds was one of his better seasons as a hitter, as he led the league in doubles and was among the top 10 in home runs and runs batted in. He was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies for Johnny Wyrostek before the start of the 1948 season. Miller served as the Phillies' shortstop in 1948 but moved to second base in 1949 when he swapped positions with Granny Hamner. After two average seasons with Philadelphia, he was acquired by the St. Louis Cardinals for the 1950 season, his last in the majors.

Johnny Mize, the burly first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and New York Yankees, paced or tied for the National League lead in home runs four times, hitting three in a single game on six occasions. The 10-time All-Star also won three RBI crowns and one batting championship. After the "Big Cat" joined the Yankees, they won five consecutive World Series titles (1949-1953), with Mize batting .400 and hitting three homers in the 1952 Fall Classic. He finished his career with 359 home runs and a .312 batting average. Elected 1981.

Patrick Joseph Mullin (November 1, 1917 – August 14, 1999) was a Major League Baseball outfielder for the Detroit Tigers from 1940 to 1941 and 1946 to 1953. Born in Trotter, near Connellsville in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, Mullin was signed by the Tigers before the 1937 season as a 19-year-old amateur free agent. Mullin reached the major leagues at age 22 in the final week of the 1940 season, going hitless in four at bats. The Tigers won the American League pennant in 1940, but Mullin did not play in the World Series. He started the 1941 season in the minor leagues at Buffalo, but was brought back up midseason and made a big impression, batting .345 with a .400 on-base percentage and a .509 slugging percentage. In just 54 games, Mullin had 76 hits, scored 42 runs, and 21 extra base hits. Based on his performance in 1941, Mullin appeared to be a rising star. However, World War II intervened and Mullin joined the United States Army, missing four full seasons during the prime of his athletic life from ages 25–28. Mullin returned to the Tigers after the war in 1946 and became a solid performer. His best seasons were 1947 and 1948, the only seasons he played in more than 110 games. In 1947, Mullin was among the American League leaders with 28 doubles and 49 extra base hits. He was elected to the American League All Star Team and finished the 1947 season with a .459 on-base percentage, a .470 slugging percentage and an OPS (on-base plus slugging) rating of .829. In 1948, Mullin was again chosen for the All Star Team. He finished the 1948 campaign with a .385 on-base percentage (driven by 143 hits and 77 bases on balls) and a .504 slugging percentage—8th best in the AL. His OPS rating in 1948 was .889 OPS—7th best in the AL behind the likes of Hall of Famers Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, and Lou Boudreau. Mullin was also among the 1948 league leaders in triples (22), home runs (23), and at bats per home run (21.6). After the 1948 season, Mullin played largely as a reserve outfielder and left-handed hitting pinch hitter. On June 26, 1949, Mullin hit three home runs in a single game.[1] Mullin had 57 pinch hitting appearances in 1953. Mullin retired at the end of the 1953 season, a month shy of his 36th birthday. In ten major league seasons, Mullin played in 834 games for the Tigers, 637 as an outfielder and the rest as a pinch hitter. He finished with a career .271 batting average, 676 hits, and 385 RBIs, a .358 on-base percentage, .453 slugging percentage, and .811 OPS rating.

"Here stands baseball's perfect warrior. Here stands baseball's perfect knight," once proclaimed Ford C. Frick of Stan Musial. After 22 years with the St. Louis Cardinals, Musial ranked at or near the top of baseball's all-time lists in nearly every offensive category,. He topped the .300 mark in 17 consecutive seasons and won seven National League batting titles with his famed "corkscrew" stance and ringing line drives. A three-time MVP, "The Man" played in 24 All-Star Games and was a member of three World Series championship teams. In 1948, Musial feel a home run shy of capturing the Triple Crown. In 2011, Musial was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Elected 1969.

A Michigan native, Hal Newhouser's dream was to pitch for the Detroit Tigers. "Prince Hal" would spend 15 of 17 seasons with his hometown team, inning 207 games and back-to-back MVP Awards in 1944 and 1945. The left handed pitcher punished batters throughout the 1940s, leading the major leagues in wins, complete games, shutouts, innings and strikeouts during the decade. Newhouser helped Detroit win the 1945 World Series, earning two victories, including the decisive game 7. "He's not the gentlest character out there," said former batterymate Birdie Tebbetts, "but he wants to win. I know a lot of pleasant guys who never win." Elected 1992.

Andrew Pafko (February 25, 1921 – October 8, 2013) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs (1943–51), Brooklyn Dodgers (1951–52), and Milwaukee Braves (1953–59). He batted and threw right-handed and played center field. Pafko was born in Boyceville, Wisconsin. In his 17-year MLB career, he was an All-Star for four seasons and was a .285 hitter with 213 home runs and 976 RBI, in 1852 games. In 1999, he was named to the Chicago Cubs All-Century Team. In 1941, Pafko played on the Green Bay Blue Sox team in the Wisconsin State League. He had 12 home runs, 66 RBIs, while batting .349 on the team that won the league championship. He played another season in the minor league before debuting in the major league in 1943 with the Chicago Cubs. Nicknamed "Handy Andy", Pafko was a popular player well known for good hitting and fielding, and contributed to championship-caliber teams in three different cities. He played for the Chicago Cubs during their 1945 World Series appearance. After Cubs third baseman Stan Hack retired the following year, Pafko replaced him at third base long enough to be almost named an All-Star there. MLB cancelled the All-Star Game and selection that season due to the war and the Associated Press sportswriters named Pafko as one of their All-Stars. Pafko did become a four-time consecutive All-Star from 1947 through 1950, making him one of the few players to achieve All-Star status in both the infield and outfield. Pafko was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers in June 1951 during the middle of the season; he was the left fielder when Bobby Thomson hit the "Shot Heard 'Round the World." Pafko returned home when he was traded to the Boston Braves before the start of the 1953 season, becoming the only Wisconsin native on the Braves roster when they arrived in Milwaukee and participating in their strong contending teams there, including the 1957 World Series champions. Pafko started in the first game at Milwaukee County Stadium on April 3, 1953. A devout Slovak Lutheran, he was an instant favorite with Milwaukee's large Eastern European community. In the mid-1950s, the Milwaukee area Lutherans had an "Andy Pafko Night" and gave him a new car.

Joseph Francis Page (October 28, 1917 – April 21, 1980), nicknamed Fireman and The Gay Reliever,[1] was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher. Page, who was left-handed, played with the New York Yankees from 1944 to 1950 and with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. Page was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. After spending time in the Yankees farm system, Page made his Major League Baseball debut on April 19, 1944 where he began his career as a starter. In his rookie season (starting 16 games, and relieving in three others), Page was voted to play in the All-Star Game and ended his season with over 100 innings pitched and a 4.56 ERA. The next season, Page suffered a shoulder injury, which led him to start only nine of the twenty games he pitched. That season, Page improved his ERA to 2.82, along with a 6–3 record. In 1946, Page split his time between closing and starting games, and he picked up three saves while posting a 3.57 ERA and a 9–8 record. In 1947, Page spent practically the whole season in the bullpen and only started twice. He was voted to play in the All-Star Game once again, because of his 2.48 ERA and a 14–8 record. He also led the American League with 17 saves this season. (Note that the save statistic was not an official baseball statistic until 1969, and had not even entered common usage until well after Page did this; this feat is something that is only retroactively appreciated. However, it was certainly appreciated at the time that Page played a greater than average role as the Yankees relief pitcher, at a time when there was no generally acknowledged "closing pitcher" role in baseball, and when starting pitchers were more often expected to finish complete games.) His fourteen relief wins in 1947 was an American League record until Luis Arroyo broke it in 1961. He was fourth in the league in American League MVP voting. In the seventh game of the 1947 World Series he earned the save by inducing Brooklyn Dodgers hitter Eddie Miksis to hit into a series-ending double play.

Harold "Pee Wee" Reese captained the dominant Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the 1950s - a symbol of strength and unity both on and off the field. An outstanding defensive player, Reese led the National League in put-outs four times, double plays twice, fielding percentage and assists once each, while forming one of baseball's top double-paly combinations with Jackie Robinson. Their relationship drew national attention during Robinson's 1947 barrier-breaking season when Reese offered public support to baseball's first modern African-American teammate. Elected 1984.

Harold "Pee Wee" Reese captained the dominant Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the 1950s - a symbol of strength and unity both on and off the field. An outstanding defensive player, Reese led the National League in put-outs four times, double plays twice, fielding percentage and assists once each, while forming one of baseball's top double-paly combinations with Jackie Robinson. Their relationship drew national attention during Robinson's 1947 barrier-breaking season when Reese offered public support to baseball's first modern African-American teammate. Elected 1984.

Warren Vincent "Buddy" Rosar (July 3, 1914 – March 13, 1994) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher from 1939 to 1951 for the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Athletics, and Boston Red Sox. A five-time All-Star, Rosar was regarded as an excellent defensive catcher, setting a major league record for consecutive games without an error by a catcher. He is one of only three catchers in Major League history to catch at least 100 games in a single season without committing an error. n a thirteen-year major league career, Rosar played in 988 games, with 836 hits for a .261 career batting average, along with 18 home runs and 367 runs batted in. Despite his relatively low offensive statistics, Rosar's defensive skills earned him a place on the American League All-Star team five times during his career. Rosar led all American League catchers in fielding percentage four years (1944, 1946–1948) He also led the league three times in assists, twice in baserunners caught stealing and once in caught stealing percentage. His 54.81% career caught stealing percentage ranks him third all-time behind only Roy Campanella and Gabby Hartnett. Rosar caught two no hitter games in his career, pitched by Dick Fowler in 1945, and Bill McCahan in 1947. He has the best ratio of double plays to errors of any catcher in major league history. Rosar holds the 20th Century career record for fewest passed balls per games caught (0.0300) with only 28 miscues in 934 games as catcher. Rosar's .992 career fielding percentage was 10 points higher than the league average during his playing career, and at the time of his retirement in 1951, was the highest for a catcher in major league history.

Lynwood Thomas "Schoolboy" Rowe (January 11, 1910 – January 8, 1961) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, primarily for the Detroit Tigers (1932–42) and Philadelphia Phillies (1943, 1946–49). He was a three-time All-Star (1935, 1936 & 1947), and a member of three Tigers' World Series teams (1934, 1935 & 1940). Rowe also contributed to the Tigers' success in 1934 and 1935 with his hitting. In 1934, he hit for a .303 batting average and had eight doubles, two home runs, and 22 RBIs in 109 at bats. In 1935, he raised his average to .312 with three home runs and 28 RBIs in 109 at bats. In his fifteen seasons in the big leagues, Rowe hit eighteen home runs (14th best in major league history for a pitcher) and 153 RBIs. His career batting average was .263 (239-for-909).

Government Postcard SAIN, JOHNNY MINT 9

John Franklin Sain (September 25, 1917 – November 7, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who was best known for teaming with left-hander Warren Spahn on the Boston Braves teams from 1946 to 1951. He was the runner-up for the National League's Most Valuable Player Award in the Braves' pennant-winning season of 1948, after leading the National League in wins, complete games and innings pitched. He later became further well known as one of the top pitching coaches in the majors. Born in Havana, Arkansas, Sain pitched for 11 years, winning 139 games and losing 116 in his career and compiled an earned run average of 3.49. His best years were those immediately after World War II, when he won 100 games for the Boston Braves, before being traded to the New York Yankees during the 1951 season for Lew Burdette and cash. Sain also had the distinction of being the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth in a game and the first in the Major League to throw a pitch against Jackie Robinson. In 1948, Sain won 24 games against 15 losses and finished second in the voting for the Most Valuable Player Award behind the St. Louis Cardinals' Stan Musial, who had won two legs of the Triple Crown. Sain and teammate Spahn achieved joint immortality that year when their feats were the subject of sports editor Gerald V. Hern's poem in the Boston Post which was eventually shortened to the epigram "Spahn and Sain; then pray for rain." The poem was inspired by the performance of Sain and Spahn during the Braves' 1948 pennant drive. The team swept a Labor Day doubleheader, with Spahn throwing a complete game 14-inning win in the opener, and Sain pitching a shutout in the second game. Following two off days, it did rain. Spahn won the next day, and Sain won the day after that. Three days later, Spahn won again. Sain won the next day. After one more off day, the two pitchers were brought back, and won another doubleheader. The two pitchers had gone 8–0 in twelve days' time. That year, the Boston Braves won their second and last National League pennant of the post-1901 era, but fell in six games to the Cleveland Indians in the 1948 World Series. Sain won the first game of the Series, a 1–0 shutout at Braves Field that included a memorable play in which Boston catcher Phil Masi was called safe after an apparent pickoff at second base. Masi went on to score the game's only run. With the Yankees, Sain became a relief pitcher and enjoyed late-career success, leading the American League in saves with 22 in 1954. He finished his career in 1955 with the Kansas City Athletics. A very good hitting pitcher in his 11 year major league career, Sain posted a .245 batting average with 69 runs, 3 home runs and 101 RBI.

Government Postcard SAIN, JOHNNY MINT 9

John Franklin Sain (September 25, 1917 – November 7, 2006) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who was best known for teaming with left-hander Warren Spahn on the Boston Braves teams from 1946 to 1951. He was the runner-up for the National League's Most Valuable Player Award in the Braves' pennant-winning season of 1948, after leading the National League in wins, complete games and innings pitched. He later became further well known as one of the top pitching coaches in the majors. Born in Havana, Arkansas, Sain pitched for 11 years, winning 139 games and losing 116 in his career and compiled an earned run average of 3.49. His best years were those immediately after World War II, when he won 100 games for the Boston Braves, before being traded to the New York Yankees during the 1951 season for Lew Burdette and cash. Sain also had the distinction of being the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth in a game and the first in the Major League to throw a pitch against Jackie Robinson. In 1948, Sain won 24 games against 15 losses and finished second in the voting for the Most Valuable Player Award behind the St. Louis Cardinals' Stan Musial, who had won two legs of the Triple Crown. Sain and teammate Spahn achieved joint immortality that year when their feats were the subject of sports editor Gerald V. Hern's poem in the Boston Post which was eventually shortened to the epigram "Spahn and Sain; then pray for rain." The poem was inspired by the performance of Sain and Spahn during the Braves' 1948 pennant drive. The team swept a Labor Day doubleheader, with Spahn throwing a complete game 14-inning win in the opener, and Sain pitching a shutout in the second game. Following two off days, it did rain. Spahn won the next day, and Sain won the day after that. Three days later, Spahn won again. Sain won the next day. After one more off day, the two pitchers were brought back, and won another doubleheader. The two pitchers had gone 8–0 in twelve days' time. That year, the Boston Braves won their second and last National League pennant of the post-1901 era, but fell in six games to the Cleveland Indians in the 1948 World Series. Sain won the first game of the Series, a 1–0 shutout at Braves Field that included a memorable play in which Boston catcher Phil Masi was called safe after an apparent pickoff at second base. Masi went on to score the game's only run. With the Yankees, Sain became a relief pitcher and enjoyed late-career success, leading the American League in saves with 22 in 1954. He finished his career in 1955 with the Kansas City Athletics. A very good hitting pitcher in his 11 year major league career, Sain posted a .245 batting average with 69 runs, 3 home runs and 101 RBI.

Francis Joseph "Spec" Shea (October 2, 1920 – July 19, 2002) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1947–1955. He played for the New York Yankees from 1947–1951 and the Washington Senators from 1952–1955. He was known as "The Naugatuck Nugget" as a result of him being from Naugatuck, Connecticut, and was named as such by Yankees broadcaster Mel Allen, and was nicknamed "Spec" because of his freckles. Shea originally signed with the Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. He spent the 1940 season playing in Amsterdam, winning 11 and losing four while pitching 137 innings. In 1941, he was promoted to Norfolk, where he struck out 154 in 199 innings, and in 1942 he played in Kansas City, where he improved upon his earned run average. He was a member of the United States Military, serving in World War II. He joined in 1943 and served for three years, where he served solely as a soldier and did not play baseball. He was promoted to the Yankees' major league roster at the start of the 1947 New York Yankees season, and made his debut on April 19, 1947. He made his debut against the Boston Red Sox, which was so looked forward to at Naugatuck High School, his alma mater, that the school suspended operations for the day because most of the student body went to New York to root for Spec. As a rookie, Shea played in his first and only All-Star Game, playing in the 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In the game, Shea pitched the 4th, 5th, and 6th innings, relieving for Hal Newhouser. He allowed one earned run and was declared the winning pitcher of the All-Star Game. The same year, MLB established the Rookie of the Year Award. In the middle of the season, however, Shea was sidelined for seven weeks due to a pulled neck muscle. Shea finished the season with a 14–5 record in 27 appearances, had the lowest hits allowed per nine innings pitched in the majors with 6.4, had the best win-loss record in the American League with .737%, threw 13 complete games, three shutouts, and had an ERA of 3.07. Shea was in the running for the Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award, which went to Jackie Robinson. Shea finished third in voting behind Robinson and Larry Jansen, but would have won the award had the American and National Leagues had separate Rookie of the Year winners. In the 1947 World Series, Shea started games one, five and seven, winning the first two in route to the Yankees' World Series victory. From 1948 to 1951, however, Shea had a combined 15-16 record, continuing to pitch in pain due to a nagging neck injury suffered in 1947. Instead of it being arm trouble as the Yankees believed, it was an issue that was solved by Shea visiting a chiropractor during the winter before the 1951 New York Yankees season. On May 3, 1952, Shea was traded by the Yankees with Jackie Jensen, Jerry Snyder, and Archie Wilson to the Washington Senators for Irv Noren and Tom Upton. In 1952 he had an 11–7 record with a 2.93 ERA, and in 1953 he had a 12–7 record with

In 1936 - after being scolded by manager Eddie Dyer - Enos Slaughter vowed never to loaf again. His newfound commitment made him one of the game's greatest hitters' "(Slaughter) would run through a brick wall, if necessary, to make a catch, or slide into a pit of ground glass to score a run," wrote New York Times sportswriter Arthur Daley. "Country" was a 10-time All-Star and part of four World Series championship teams. He used a flat, level swing and was regarded as a consistent, clutch hitter. His "mad dash" home from first base on Harry Walker's hit won the 1946 Fall Classic for the St. Louis Cardinals. Elected 1985.

Stylish Warren Spahn is the winningest left-hander in history with 363 victories - all but seven coming as a member of the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. Spahn turned 25 years old before winning his first game and was a 23-game winner 17 years later. Following his credo that "hitting is timing and pitching is upsetting timing," he used a wide repertoire of pitches and a smooth overhand delivery to baffle hitters for 21 seasons, winning 20 games 13 times. The World War II veteran hurled two no-hitters and won the 1957 Cy Young Award. Elected 1973.

Stanley Orville Spence (March 20, 1915 – January 9, 1983) was a Major League Baseball center fielder who played from 1940 through 1949 for the Boston Red Sox (1940–41,1948–49), Washington Senators (1942–47) and St. Louis Browns (1949). A part-time player for the Boston Red Sox during two years, Spence played his first full-season for the Washington Senators in 1942 and he responded ending third in the American League batting race with a .323 average behind Ted Williams (.356) and Johnny Pesky (.331). His most productive season came in 1944, when he hit .316 and posted career-highs with 18 home runs and 100 runs batted in. After serving in World War II in 1945, he returned to the Senators a year later and hit a career-high 50 doubles with 10 triples and 16 home runs. Spence did a second stint with Boston and ended his majors’ career with the St. Louis Browns. A four-time All-Star in 1942, 1944, 1946 and 1947, he also was considered in the MVP vote in 1942 and from 1945 to 1947. Spence hit a pivotal single in the 1947 Major League All-Star Game at Wrigley Field. Prior to his at-bat, former teammate Bobby Doerr singled, stole second, and then took third on pitcher Johnny Sain's errant pickoff attempt. Spence's pinch single resulted in the final margin of 2–1. In a nine-season career, Spence was a .282 hitter with 95 home runs and 575 RBI in 1112 games. He recorded a .984 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions and at first base.

Paul Howard "Dizzy" Trout (June 29, 1915 – February 28, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles between 1939 and 1957. Trout was born in Sandcut, Indiana. He first played professionally in 1935 with the Terre Haute Tots in the Three-I League before signing with the Tigers in 1939. Dizzy Trout led the American League in wins (20) in 1943, but his best season was 1944, when he won 27 games and lost 14. He led the American League that year in ERA (2.12), complete games (33), shutouts (7), and innings pitched (352-1/3). He also finished second in the league to his Detroit teammate, Hal Newhouser, in wins (27) and strikeouts (144). The Tigers' pitching duo of Trout and Newhouser won 56 games in 1944 and finished 1-2 in ERA, wins, innings pitched, strikeouts, complete games, and shutouts. Newhouser and Trout also finished 1-2 in the American League MVP voting, with Trout trailing Newhouser in the voting by only 4 votes.

Fred E. "Dixie" Walker (September 24, 1910 – May 17, 1982) was an American professional baseball player, coach, scout and minor league manager. He played as a right fielder in Major League Baseball from 1931 to 1949. Although Walker was a five-time All-Star selection, and won a National League batting championship (1944) as well as an RBI championship (1945) as a member of the Brooklyn Dodgers, his accomplishments as a player were overshadowed by his attempt to keep Jackie Robinson from joining the Dodgers in 1947. He also played for the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers and the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 11 years in the National League, Walker posted a .310 batting average (in nine seasons in the American League, an average of .295), with 105 total home runs and 1,023 RBIs in 1,905 games. Walker's popularity with the Ebbets Field fans in the 1940s brought him the nickname "The People's Cherce" (so-called, and spelled, because "Choice" in the "Brooklynese" of the mid-20th century frequently was pronounced that way).

Theodore Samuel Williams had only one goal in life; to walk down the street and have people say, "There goes the greatest hitter who ever lived." In a 19 year career with the Boston Red Sox - twice interrupted by military service - "The Splendid Splinter" won two Triple Crowns, two MVP Awards and six batting championships. He retired with a career average of .344 and remains the last player to top .400 for a full season (batting .406 in 1941). With keen eyesight, quick wrists and a simple motto - "Get a good ball to hit" - Williams compiled all the evidence he needed to achieve his goal. Elected 1966.

The winner of exactly 300 games during a 23-year career, Early Wynn was a hard-nosed competitor. Once asked would he throw at his grandmother, Wynn replied, "Only if she was digging in." Mickey Mantle once said, "He'd knock you down in the dugout." Wynn won at least 20 games five times, recorded 49 shutouts and earned nine All-Star selections. He captured the 1959 Cy Young Award while helping lead the Chicago White Sox to the World Series. Wynn's durability enabled him to top the American League in innings three times. His 23 seasons in the AL remain a league record total for pitchers. Elected 1972.

Preston Rudolph York (August 17, 1913 – February 5, 1970) was an American baseball player, coach, scout, and manager. York played professional baseball, primarily as a first baseman but also as a catcher, for 18 years from 1933 to 1951, including all or part of 13 seasons in Major League Baseball for the Detroit Tigers (1934, 1937–45), Boston Red Sox (1946–47), Chicago White Sox(1947) and Philadelphia Athletics (1948). York was named to the American League All-Star team seven times. He broke Babe Ruth's record by hitting 18 home runs in a single month – a feat he accomplished as a rookie in 1937. In 1943, he led the American League with 34 home runs, 118 RBIs, a .527 slugging percentage, and 301 total bases. He was the starting first baseman and leading slugger for the Detroit team that won the 1945 World Series. After his playing career ended, he worked from 1951 to 1964 as a professional baseball manager, coach, and scout. He was the batting coach for the Boston Red Sox for four years from 1959 to 1962, including one game in July 1959 in which he acted as the team's interim manager.