Sports - 1964-Date Hall of Fame Yellow Plaque Postcards: Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Exhibiting an understated style that became his trademark, Hank Aaron hammered his way to baseball's all-time home run mark via one of the most consistent offensive careers in history. He hit 755 home runs, a record that stood for more than 30 years, and still holds major league marks for total bases, extra base hits and RBI, while his 3,771 career hits ranks third. He was the 1957 National League MVP, won three Gold Glove Awards for his play in right field and was named to a record 25 All-Star teams. Curt Simmons once said of Aaron, "Trying to throw a fastball by him is like trying to sneak a sunrise past a rooster." Elected 1982.

Dazzling, talented Roberto Alomar was arguably the premier second baseman of his era, earning a dozen consecutive All-Star selections. The switch-hitter menaced the opposition at the plate and on the base paths. bating .300 for his career and stealing at least 30 bases in eight seasons. Elected 2011.

Always displaying a calm, professional demeanor, the unflappable Walter Alston managed the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers for 23 seasons - on 23 one-year contracts - winning seven National League pennants and for World Series Championships, including Brooklyn's only title in 1955. His squads won 2,040 games during his tenure. Elected 1983.

George "Sparky" Anderson was the first manager in history to win World Series championships in both the American and National leagues, doing so with the Detroit Tigers and the Cincinnati Reds. His career totals include 2,194 victories, two manager of the year awards, five league pennants and three World Series crowns. Elected 2000.

Following his Rookie of the Year debut in 1956, Luis Aparicio helped to redefine the role and expectations of major league shortstops with agile fielding, spray hitting and speedy base running. He collected nine Gold Glove awards, led the American League in stolen bases nine times and was named to the All-Star game 13 times. Elected 1984.

Manning the Chicago White Sox shortstop position throughout his 20-year career, Luke Appling proved to be a consistent fielder, solid batter and fan favorite. As a leadoff hitter, he was known for his ability to intentionally foul off pitches until hitting the pitch he wanted. Appling twice captured American League batting titles and finished with a .310 lifetime batting average. He collected 2,749 career hits. The seven-time All-Star also was selected as the Chicago White Sox's greatest player by Chicago fans in 1969. Elected 1964.

Among the most reliable leadoff batters in history, Richie Ashburn was a solid center fielder and consistent hitter who sprayed hits to all fields for the Philadelphia Phillies. He hit better than .300 during nine of 15 seasons, twice capturing the National League batting titles, while finishing second two other times. A .308 lifetime batter, Ashburn also led the NL in walks four times. A six-time All-Star selection "Whitey" transitioned to the broadcast booth following his career to become a popular Phillies announcer for more than three decades. Elected 1995.

Earl Averill was a nimble center fielder and outstanding offensive performer during his 13 year playing career, spent primarily with the Cleveland Indians. He hit better than .300 in eight seasons, finished with a lifetime average of .318 and held the Indians record for home runs for 55 years. A fan favorite, he smacked 238 home runs and was selected to the American League All-Star team six times. Elected 1975.

Perhaps the subject of the most well known deadline deal in history, Jeff Bagwell proved to be the perfect fit in Houston. Traded by his hometown Red Sox before he ever appeared in a big league game, Bagwell won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1991 with his patient approach at the plate. By 1994, Bagwell added power in his resume, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 116 runs in that strike-shortened campaign to win the NL MVP Award. In 15 big league seasons, all spent with the Astros, the four time All-Star hit .297 with 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI and a .408 on base percentage. Elected 2017.

Harold Douglas Baines (born March 15, 1959) is an American former professional baseball right fielder and designated hitter (DH), who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, and Cleveland Indians, for 22 seasons (1980–2001).[1] Baines batted and threw left-handed. He had three stints as a player with the White Sox, where he also coached from 2004 to 2015, before moving into a role of team ambassador and spring training instructor. Baines, a Maryland native, played seven years with his hometown team, the Orioles, over three separate stints. Upon his retirement, Baines ranked seventh in American League (AL) history in games played (2,830) and tenth in runs batted in (RBI) (1,628). Noted as well for his power hitting in clutch situations, he is tied for seventh in AL history in grand slams (13), fourth in three-home-run games (3), and tied for seventh in major league history in walk-off home runs (10). Baines batted over .300 eight times and hit .324 in 31 career postseason games, topping the .350 mark in five separate series. A six-time All-Star, Baines led the AL in slugging percentage in 1984. He held the White Sox team record for career home runs from 1987 until Carlton Fisk passed him in 1990; Baines’s eventual total of 221 remains the club record for left-handed hitters, as do his 981 RBI, and 585 extra base hits with the team. His 1,643 games as a DH were a big league record until David Ortiz broke that record in 2014. He held the mark for career home runs as a DH (236) until Edgar Martínez passed him in 2004. Baines also led the major leagues in hits as a DH (1,688) until the mark was surpassed by Ortiz in 2013. Baines was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Today's Game Era Committee as part of the Class of 2019.

Heir to Honus Wagner's throne, Bancroft was the senior circuit's best shortstop in the late 1910's and 1920's. His play was, like his nickname, a thing of "Beauty". Bancroft is a very rare Hall of Fame autograph, especially on yellow plaque postcards because he was inducted in 1971 and died the following year.

Noted for his cheerful disposition, excellent all-around play, and powerful home runs, Ernie Banks was a favorite among Chicago Cubs fans. A 14-time All-Star, he was twice voted National League Most Valuable Player and knocked 512 home runs during his 19-year career with the Cubs. The shortstop and first baseman twice led the league in home runs and RBI. "Mr. Cub" displayed his perpetual love for the game with his signature phrase "Let's play two!" Elected 1977.

A World War II Coast Guard veteran who became a umpire as a result of a coal mining strike, Al Barlick served as a National League umpire for 28 years, breaking in at the age of 25. With seven All-Star games and seven World Series assignments, he developed a reputation for hustle, a stern demeanor, and a strict, but fair interpretation of the rules. Elected 1989.

"Going from first to home Jesse Owens wouldn't have beaten "Cool Papa Bell" said former Negro League star Buck O'Neal. Legendary speed and a sharp batting eye made James "Cool Papa" Bell a top run producer in the Negro Leagues. His .318 career batting average made him a devastating leadoff hitter, and he was an excellent defensive center fielder. Bell played from 1922 to 1950, and served as player-manager the last four years of his career. Elected 1974.

In 1969, Ted Williams autographed a ball for Johnny Bench, "To a Hall of Famer for sure." Perhaps the best defensive catcher of all time, Bench won ten straight Gold Glove Awards and popularized the one-handed style of catching. Bench crushed 389 lifetime home runs and batted .267 for his career. He led the National League in home runs twice, RBI three times and total bases once. He won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1970 and 1972 and the World Series MVP in 1976. With Bench behind the plate the Cincinnati Reds won four pennants and two World Series. Elected 1989.

"If you can't imitate him, don't copy him," Yogi Berra once said. There was no imitating Berra, one of the most unique characters in baseball history, known for his witty "Yogi-isms." In 19 seasons as a player, the 18 time All-Star won 14 pennants, 10 World Series and three Most Valuable Player Awards. Berra regularly finished in the top 10 in homers and RBI, including 358 and 1,430 for his career, respectively. In seven seasons managing the New York Yankees and Mets, Berra won pennants in each league and spent 20 seasons as a coach with the Houston Astros, Mets and Yankees. Elected 1972.

Starting out as a catcher before moving to second base and then the outfield, Craig Biggio won Silver Slugger Awards both behind the plate and at the keystone sack during a career defined by versatility and determination. A four time Gold Glove Award winner at second base, he led the Astros to six postseason appearances - including their first National League pennant in 2005. A seven time All-Star, Biggio retired as the only player in big league history with at least 3,000 hits, 600 doubles, 400 stolen bases and 250 home runs. Elected 2015.

Bert Blyleven was armed with outstanding control and a wicked curveball that proved to be one of the toughest to hit in the history of the game. The tall right-hander with a fluid pitching motion came to the majors at age 19 and remained durable over 22 big league seasons with five different teams, garnering 287 wins and 60 shutouts. The "Dutch Master" also compiled 3,701 strikeouts, baseball's third highest career total at the time he retired. He was a key cog in two playoffs, contributing to Fall Classic crowns for both the 1979 Pirates and the 1987 Twins. Elected 2011.

"He may have the best hand-eye coordination of anyone I've ever seen," Ted Williams once noted of Wade Boggs. A lifetime .328 hitter and five time American League batting champion, including four in a row, Boggs totaled seven consecutive 200-hit seasons and led the AL in on-base percentage six times. After the 1992 season, Boggs moved from the Boston Red Sox to the rival New York Yankees, where he earned two Gold Glove Awards and, in 1996, a World Series title. The 12 time All-Star finished his career with his home town Tampa Bay Devil Rays, hitting a home run for his 3,000 career hit in 1999. Elected 2005.

A great all-around player, Lou Boudreau became the Cleveland Indians' regular shortstop in 1940, and two years later was named the team's player-manager, one of the youngest ever to hold such a position. He led Cleveland to the 1948 World Series championship and was named the American League Most Valuable Player. A four-time .300 hitter, Boudreau hit .295 for his career and led AL shortstops in fielding eight times. Boudreau will be remembered for inventing the "Williams shift," placing most of the fielders on the right side of the diamond against left handed Red Sox slugger Ted Williams. Elected 1970.

In 21 seasons with the Kansas City Royals, George Brett topped the .300 mark 11 times, becoming the first player to win batting titles in three decades: 1976 (.333). 1980 (.390) and 1990 (.329). He led the American League in hits three times, finishing his career with 3,154, including 665 doubles, 137 triples and 317 homers. The 13 time All-Star was the AL Most Valuable Player in 1980 and earned a Gold Glove Award in 1985, the same year the Royals won their first World Series championship. Elected 1999.

Lou Brock amassed 938 career stolen bases in becoming the first player to break Ty Cobb's record of 897. A six-time All-Star, Brock recorded 3,023 hits, 1,610 runs, 486 doubles, 141 triples and 149 home runs. He led the St. Louis Cardinals to three National League pennants, hitting .391 in World Series play. The National League now honors each season's stolen base leader wit the Lou Brock Award. Elected 1985.

Displaying remarkable consistency throughout his 17-year career, Jim Bunning became the first pitcher since Cy Young to record 100 wins and 1,000 strikeouts in both the American and National Leagues. The father of nice, and from 1998 until 2010 a U.S. Senator from Kentucky, he threw a perfect game for the Philadelphia Phillies on Father's Day of 1964, his second career no-hitter (he pitched one for the Detroit Tigers six years earlier). Bunning piled up 224 career wins as a nine-time All-Star selection. Elected 1996.

"He's got everything - intelligence, strength, confidence, speed afoot and hand-eye coordination," manager Gene Mauch said of Rod Carew. "Many ballplayers are pleasant to manage, but managing Rod is a privilege." Carew was a pure hitter, who as pitcher Ken Holtzman described, "could move the bat around as if it were a magic wand." In 19 seasons with the Minnesota Twins and California Angels, Carew won seven American League batting titles, hitting .300-or-better for 15 consecutive seasons while compiling a .328 career average. He won the 1967 AL Rookie of the Year Award and the 1977 AL Most Valuable Player Award, and was selected to 18 All-Star Games. Elected 1991.

"He was just as fast between his ears as he was with his feet." said sportswriter Joe Williams. "That's what made him harder to stop than a run in a silk stocking." Max Carey hustled on the bases, totaling 738 career steals, leading the National League 10 times during his 20-year career. Defensively, Carey led the league in putouts nine times and recorded 339 outfield assists. He batter better than .300 six times, amassing 2,665 career hits. In 1925, Carey hit .343 during the regular season and .458 in the World Series. Elected 1961.

Richie Ashburn once likened Steve Carlton to an artist on the mound: "He painted a ballgame. Stroke, stroke, stroke, and when he go through it was a masterpiece." Carlton was an intense competitor with a hard biting slider that was complemented by a great fastball and curve. He ranks second on career lists for wins (329) and strikeouts (4,136) by a left-handed pitcher. In 1972, his first of four Cy Young Award-winning seasons, Carlton led the National League in wins (27), ERA (1.97), inning pitched (346.1) and strikeouts (310) - all for a last-place team that won only 59 games. Elected 1994.

A rugged receiver and enthusiastic on-field general, Gary "Kid" Carter excelled at one of baseball's most demanding positions. A three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Carter belted 324 home runs in his 19-season career and earned two All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Awards. His clutch 10th-inning single in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series sparked dramatic comeback victory, ultimately leading to a World Series title for the Mets. Elected 2003.

From his inaugural major league campaign at age 20 in 1958, when he was named the unanimous National League Rookie of the Year, and throughout his 17-year major league career, Orlando Manuel Cepeda Pennes was a powerful slugger. He hit better than .300 and ranked among the top 10 in slugging nine times, including eight seasons of 25 or more home runs. The "Baby Bull" earned the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1967, becoming the first unanimous pick in the senior circuit in 31 years. Elected 1999.

A U.S. Senator and former governor of Kentucky, Albert "Happy" Chandler succeeded Kenesaw Mountain Landis as commissioner in 1945, guiding Major League Baseball through its historic integration when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. Though he lasted just one six-year term, Chandler upheld Landis' model as an authoritarian with honesty and respect, suspending players for leaving for the Mexican League and banning Leo Durocher for one year for a series of actions. Chandler also established the now common practice of six umpires on the field for World Series games. Elected 1982.

Earle Combs was an ideal leadoff hitter for the legendary New York Yankees of the 1920's and early 1930's. A keen-eyed center fielder, he averaged nearly 200 hits and 70 walks a season during his prime years, compiling a .325 batting mark. Combs' exceptional speed aided him offensively and defensively, enabling him to lead the American League in triples three times and putouts twice. Unfortunately a pair of serious collisions - with an outfield wall in St. Louis in 1934 and with a teammate in 1935 - shortened his productive career. Elected 1970.

Jocko Conlan became an umpire by accident when Red Ormsby was overcome by the heat while umpiring a 1935 game between the Chicago White Sox and the St. Louis Browns. Conlan, then an outfielder with the White Sox, was asked to fill in. The following year, Conlan launched a new career. A polka-dot tie, balloon chest protector and a quick grin became his trademarks. Conlan won the respect of players and managers alike with his hustle, accuracy and fairness. He umpired in five World Series. Elected 1974.

A product of the Pennsylvania coal mines, Stan Coveleski learned control as a youngster by throwing rocks at the cans that swung from a tree. From the sandlot to a shutout in his first big league start with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912, Coveleski totaled five 20-win seasons with the Cleveland Indians and Washington Senators and 215 career victories. A spitball crafted in the minor leagues keyed his success for 14 seasons, during which he twice paced the league in ERA. Coveleski emerged as the hero of the 1920 World Series, with three complete game-wins for the Indians vs. Brooklyn, yielding only two runs. Elected 1969.

After Bobby Cox's playing days were cut short by injuries, he launched a historic managerial career. Cox began with four seasons as Atlanta's skipper and then moved to Toronto, winning the Blue Jays' first-ever division title in 1985. He then returned to the Braves as GM before heading back to the dugout. In 1991, he began a streak of 14 consecutive divisions crowns, the longest in all pro sports, winning five NL pennants (1991,1992, 1995, 1996 and 1999) and the 1995 World Series. Over 29 seasons as a big league pilot, Cox garnered 2,504 wins, fourth-most of all time. Elected 2014.

"Wahoo" Sam Crawford - so nicknamed for his Nebraska birthplace - was one of his era's finest hitters, and base stealers. He let the American League in triples hitters six times and remains baseball's career leader with 309. Ty Cobb said of Crawford, "With the rabbit ball their playing with today, he would have been one of the greatest home run hitters of all time." Crawford, who stole 367 bases and batted .309 lifetime during a 19-year career, played along side Cobb in Detroit's outfield for 13 seasons. Crawford helped the Tigers to three straight American League pennants from 1907 to 1909. Elected 1957.

Joe Cronin was the first to work his way from the playing field to the league presidency. A lifetime .301 hitter with 515 career doubles, Cronin was selected as an American League All-Star seven times. At age 26, he won the 1933 pennant as a player-manager with Washington Senators before being trade to the Boston Red Sox following the 1934 season, where his roles included player, manager, general manager, treasurer and vice president. He served two terms as AL president, overseeing the league's expansion from eight to twelve teams. Hall of Fames slugger Ted Williams praised his former manager stating, "Whatever I am, I owe to Joe." Elected 1956.

A standout who played in the Mexican, Negro and Cuban leagues, Ray Dandridge is often called the best third baseman never to make the majors. Dandridge was masterful on defense, combining a cannon arm with terrific reflexes and sure hands, while offensively he used excellent bat control to spray line drives throughout the ballpark. After the color line was broken, he won Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player honors in his two minor league seasons. The following year, the aging legend roomed with and mentored a promising youngster named Willie Mays. Elected 1987.

Andre Dawson was a supremely talented five-tool ballplayer, among the best in the game at bat, on the bases and in the field. The 1977 NL Rookie of the Year earned eight All-Star Game berths, eight Gold Glove Awards and four Silver Slugger Awards in his 21 years with the Expos, Cubs, Red Sox and Marlins. With Chicago in 1987, "The Hawk" became the first player on a last-placed club to win the leagues MVP Award. Dawson retired with 438 home runs and 314 stolen bases, just the second player following Willie Mays - to total more than 400 homers and 300 steals. Elected 2010.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

The flamboyant ace on the Depression era St. Louis Cardinals, Jay Hanna Dean led the raucous "Gashouse Gang" to a World Series championship in 1934, in doing so, he remains the last National League pitcher with 30 wins in a season. Given to self-assured boasting, Dean was fond of saying: "If you can do it, it ain't bragging." After a broken toe suffered in the 1937 All-Star Game led to injuries that slowing halted his pitching career, Dean became a legendary broadcaster known for twisting the English language while winning generations of fans on radio and television. Elected 1953.

As famed sportswriter Dan Daniels once wrote, "Bill Dickey isn't just a catcher, he's a ball club." A key performer for the New York Yankees on eight American League pennant-winners and seven World Series champions, the expert handler of pitchers with the deadly accurate throwing arm was also a top hitter, batting better than .300 in 10 of his first 11 full seasons. Know for his durability, he set an AL record by catching a 100 or more games 13 years in a row. Dickey finished his 17-year career with a .313 batting average. Elected 1954.

Joe DiMaggio's grace and class transcended the playing field into American culture. His ability at the plate and in center field led Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack to note, "DiMaggio is the best player that ever lived." Joltin' Joe's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 helped him to the second of three Most Valuable Player Awards. The "Yankee Clipper" was an All-Star every season of during his 13-year career. At baseball's 1969 Centennial Celebration, he was named the game's greatest living legend. Elected 1955.

"I knew being accepted was going to be hard, but I knew I was involved in a situation that was going to bring opportunities to other blacks," said Larry Doby, the first African American in the American League. Doby broke the junior circuit's color barrier in 1947, just weeks after Jackie Robinson's NL debut. He was signed by the Cleveland Indians following a short career with the Negro National League's Newark Eagles, where he played alongside future Hall of Famer Monte Irvin. A power-hitting center fielder and a key member of Cleveland's 1948 and 1954 pennant winners, Doby twice led the AL in home runs and was a seven-time All-Star in 13 major league seasons. Elected 1998.

Described by Hall of Famer Joe Cronin as "fine a man as ever wore a spike shoe," Bobby Doerr compiled a career .980 fielding percentage as the Boston Red Sox's second baseman for 14 seasons. Also a powerful hitter, he drove in 100 runs six times, with a high of 120 in 1950. Doerr once set an American League Record by handling 414 chances without an error and frequently led the circuit's second baseman in double plays, putouts and assists. Hall of Fame teammate Ted Williams called Doerr "the silent captain of the Red Sox." Elected 1986.

Don Drysdale teamed with Sandy Koufax during the 1960's to form one of the most dominating pitching duos in history. Utilizing numerous pitches to work both sides of the plate, Drysdale developed a reputation as an intimidator, hitting 154 batters to set a modern National League record. "The trick against Drysdale," said Hall of Game Slugger Orlando Cepeda, "is to hit him before he hits you." A workhorse as well, Drysdale led the NL in games started from 1962 to 1965, and set a record with 58 consecutive scoreless innings in 1968. The two-time 20-game winner won the Cy Young Award in 1962. Elected 1984.

During the first half of his 24-year major league career, Dennis Eckersley won more than 150 games as a starting pitcher, including a 1977 no-hitter. In his final dozen seasons, Eckersley saved nearly 400 games, earning both Cy Young and Most Valuable Player honors in 1992. "I just like to think of myself as a pitcher," he said upon his election to the Hall of Fame. "People think of me more as a closer, because that's where I had the most success, but I like to think it was the uniqueness of my career that got me in." Elected 2004.

Urban "Red" Faber combined guile and then-legal spitball to win 254 games in a 20-year career, spent entirely with the Chicago White Sox. Faber topped 20 wins four times, despite his White Sox finishing 15 of his 20 seasons in the lower half of the league. Faber turned to the spitter after suffering arm trouble in the minors, but his catcher, Hall of Famer Ray Schalk, said Faber would use the pitch sparingly; "He'd just keep batters guessing." Faber defeated the New York Giants three times in the 1917 World Series, and pitched his best in 1921, when he won 25 games for a seventh-place team. Elected 1964.

When Bob Feller said of his pitching; "I just reared back and let them go," he accurately described his blazing fastball. "Rapid Robert" set the standard for generations of future fireballers. During his 18-year career - spent entirely with the Cleveland Indians - Feller amassed 266 victories, leading the league in wins six times and strikeouts seven. After enlisting in the Navy in 1941, he missed nearly four full seasons to serve his country. As a Navy gun captain, Feller earned five campaign ribbons studded with eight battle stars. Feller authored three no-hitters and 12 one-hitter, winning 20 or more games six times. Elected 1962.

A strong and durable receiver for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators, Rick Ferrell set an American League record for games caught (1,806) that lasted more than 40 years. Ferrell had a special knack for handling the knuckler - the out-pitch for four Senator starters. The reliable backstop hit .281 lifetime and better than .300 four times during an 18-year career. Connie Mack's respect for the North Carolina farm boy was so great that Ferrell caught all nice innings of the first All-Star Game in 1933. Ferrell was ultimately names to seven All-Star teams. Elected 1984.

Rollie Fingers' 17-year career traced the development of the modern-day relief ace. An inconsistent starter, Fingers moved into the bullpen where he excelled quickly and frequently in an unspecialized role. "I was pitching four or five innings sometimes." Fingers said. "There was no such thing as a setup man. I was my own." Relying on a sharp slider, Fingers became the first pitcher to top 300 saves, totaling 341. Known for his handlebar mustache, Fingers became a regular during the postseason, appearing in 16 World Series games. The seven-time All-Star also won both the American League and Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards in 1981. Elected 1992.

Baseball's most durable catcher, with 24 years behind the plate and more games (2,226) than any backstop in history at the time of his retirement, Carlton "Pudge" Fisk split his career between the Boston Red Sox and the Chicago White Sox. Fisk was known for his tremendous intensity, summed up by Red Sox manager Eddie Kasko; "He plays as if he were on the Crusades." The 11-time All-Star hit 376 career regular-season home runs. His memorable 12th-inning blast off the foul pole at Fenway Park in game 6 of the 1975 World Series gave the Red Sox a 7-6 win over Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine." Elected 2000.

Like the original Roy Hobbs, Elmer Flick reported to the Philadelphia Phillies in the spring of 1898 with a bat he had turned on a lathe himself. Described by sportswriter Francis Richter as "one of the most promising youngsters the Phillies had ever had." Flick replaced injured Hall of Famer Sam Thompson in the outfield and remained in the majors for the next 13 seasons. In four full years with the Phillies, Flick hit .338. In nine seasons with the Cleveland Naps, the speedster let the American League in stolen bases twice, triples three times and retired with a .313 lifetime average. Elected 1963.

Edward "Whitey" Ford was the big-game pitcher on the great New York Yankees teams of the 1950's and early 1960's. Catcher Elston Howard nicknamed Ford the "Chairman of the Board" for his ability to manage his fielders and control the game. Ford's lifetime record of 236-106 gave him an astounding .690 winning percentage. The southpaw twice paced the American League in ERA and shutouts, also leading the league in wins three times. The 1961 AL Cy Young Award winner and 10-time All-Star still holds many World Series records, including 10 victories and 94 strikeouts, once pitching 33 consecutive scoreless innings in the Fall Classic. Elected 1974.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

A fearsome hitter whose power earned him the moniker "The Beast," Jimmie Foxx anchored an intimidating Philadelphia Athletics lineup that produced pennant winners from 1929 to 1931. The second batter in history to tope 500 home runs, Foxx belted 30 or more homers in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs 13 straight years, including an astounding 175 in 1938 with the Boston Red Sox. Referring to the powerful first baseman's physique, the New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez said, "He has muscles in his hair." A three -time Most Valuable Player, "Double X" also took the Triple Crown in 1933. Elected 1951.

Ford Frick worked as a sportswriter and broadcaster before becoming the National League president in 1934. As president, he provided the official support necessary to establish the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. When opposition arose to Jackie Robinson playing in the majors in 1947, Frick warned potential strikers that they would "be barred from baseball even though it means the disruption of a club or a whole league." Frick became Commissioner in 1951, serving in that post for 14 seasons and overseeing relocations, expansion and the transition from radio to television, which broadened coverage of the game. Elected 1970.

Known as the "Fordham Flash," Frankie Frisch jumped directly from Fordham University to the New York Giants and played o eight pennant winners in 19 seasons. A switch-hitter, Frisch compiled 11 straight .300 seasons and retired with numerous fielding records for second basemen. Recalling Frisch, writer Damon Runyon wrote, "Tell 'em most especially about the way Frisch played second base, some of center field and a slice of right field too." As player-manager (and later, manger) of the St. Louis Cardinals, Frisch instilled the rollicking, all-out style of hard-nosed play that produced two World Series championships and prompted sportswriters to tab the Cardinals "The Gashouse Gang." Elected 1947.

Known as "The Mechanical Man" for his remarkable consistency, Charlie Gehringer batted better than .300 in 13 seasons and collected more than 200 hits seven times. As New York Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez put it, "He's in a rut. He goes 2 for 5 on Opening Day and stays that way all season." An agile second baseman with quick hands, Gehringer led the league in assists and fielding percentage seven times each. Regarding his quiet reputation, the six-time All-Star said, "You can't talk your way into a batting championship." A cornerstone of three pennant-winning Tigers teams, he won the 1937 Most Valuable Player Award by batting .371. Elected 1949.

During 17 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals, Bob Gibson won 20-or-more games five times with an intimidating, dignified presence. Regarding his enormous talent, the nine-time All-Star said: "It is not something I earned or acquired or bought. It is a gift. It is something given to me." He won nine Gold Glove Awards, along with the 1968 National League Cy Young and Most Valuable Player Awards after posting a 1.12 ERA. Gibson set World Series records with seven consecutive wins and 17 strikeouts in game, and won two World Series MVP Awards (1964 and 1967). Elected 1981.

A baseball "lifer" for more than 50 years, Pat Gillick made the transition from a sore-armed minor league pitcher to a team executive, brilliant at recognizing talent and building ball clubs. Scouting and player development stints with the Houston Astros and New York Yankees led to 27 seasons as a general manager with four teams, earning 11 postseason berths and 20 winning seasons. Gillick's leadership brought the Toronto Blue Jays their first-ever Fall Classic titles in 1992 and 1993, took the Baltimore Orioles and Seattle Mariners to the playoffs, and earned a championship crown for the 2008 Philadelphia Phillies. Elected 2011.

An accomplished high school hockey player from New England, Tom Glavine spent more than two decades putting hitters' bats on ice. A strike-thrower with control and determination, Glavine was a fixture in the Braves rotation over 17 seasons, earning the 1995 World Series MVP and a pair of National League Cy Young Awards (1991, 1998). The 10-time All-Star and five-time 20-game winner ended his big league career in 2008 with a 305-203 record, a 3.54 ERA and 2,607 strikeouts. When the shrewd southpaw won his 300th game in 2007, he became just the 23rd pitcher (and fifth left-hander) to reach that milestone. Elected 2014.

Vernon "Lefty" Gomez brought a big-league fastball from California to the New York Yankees and helped guide the club to seven pennants. "El Goofy" was known for saying, "I'd rather be lucky than good." Gomez continued to win despite a sore arm, relying more on his curve. "I'm throwing as hard as I ever did; the balls just not getting there as fast," he explained. Gomez won the pitching Triple Crown twice (1934 and 1937) and was a seven-time All-Star, starting the inaugural Midsummer Classic in 1933. At his best in the World Series, Gomez won six of seven starts without a loss. Elected 1972.

With his blazing fastball and intimidating scowl, Richard "Goose" Gossage redefined success for relievers. After breaking in with the White Sox in 1972, Gossage found his role when manager Chuck Tanner made him his bullpen ace in 1975. Gossage saved 26 games that season and another 26 in 1977 after a trade to the Pirates. He left for the Yankees prior to the 1978 season, helping them to win the World Series that year by saving 27 games and winning 10 more. The in 1984 - his first season with the Padres - Gossage saved 25 games to help San Diego capture its first NL pennant. He finished his big league career with 124 wins, 310 saves and nine All-Star selections. Elected 2008.

One of three Hall of Famers to garner Most Valuable Awards at two different positions, (first base , 1935; outfield, 1940), Henry "Hank" Greenberg was one of the game's premier sluggers. Widely regarded as the first great Jewish ball player, Greenberg finished his career with 331 home runs, despite missing three full seasons and parts of two others while serving in the military. His big bat helped lead the Detroit Tigers to World Series titles in 1935 and 1945, batting .318 in four Fall Classics overall. Joe DiMaggio once said of Greenberg: "He was one of the truly great hitters, and when I first saw him at bat, he made my eyes pop out." Elected 1956.

One of three Hall of Famers to garner Most Valuable Awards at two different positions, (first base , 1935; outfield, 1940), Henry "Hank" Greenberg was one of the game's premier sluggers. Widely regarded as the first great Jewish ball player, Greenberg finished his career with 331 home runs, despite missing three full seasons and parts of two others while serving in the military. His big bat helped lead the Detroit Tigers to World Series titles in 1935 and 1945, batting .318 in four Fall Classics overall. Joe DiMaggio once said of Greenberg: "He was one of the truly great hitters, and when I first saw him at bat, he made my eyes pop out." Elected 1956.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

Burleigh Grimes, known as "Old Stubble-beard" because he didn't shave on days he pitched, won more games (190) of any pitcher in the 1920's. When he retired - Grimes had won 270 games, pitched in four World Series and was the winning pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals in game 7 of the 1931 Fall Classic. Tough as nails, he once hit six batters in two innings and was accused of throwing at a man on deck. Frankie Frisch said, "The only time I was ever scared in my life was one time when Burleigh threw at me on a 3-and-0 count." Elected 1964.

Journalist Arthur Baer once noted, "Lefty Grove could throw a lamb past a wolf." Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove, arguably one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all time, was famous for his hard-headed, competitive nature. Connie Mack purchased him from the minor-league Baltimore Orioles for a then-record $100,600 in 1924, and Grimes pitche the Philadelphia Athletics to three straight AL pennants and two World Series titles from 1929 to 1931, going 19-15. He led the league in wins on four occasions, in winning percentage in five seasons, in strikeouts seven consecutive times, and in ERA a staggering nine times. Elected 1947.

A multi-talented right fielder, Vladimir Guerrero combined power and average at the plate with speed on the bases and a terrific throwing arm in the field. A .318 lifetime hitter, Guerrero was a nine-time All-Star who hit 449 home runs over 16 seasons while never striking out more than 95 times in a season. Guerrero began his big league career with the Expos, topping the 40-home run mark in 1999 and 2000 while missing a 40 homer/40 steal season by one home run in 2002. After landing with the Angels via free agency in 2004, Guerrero celebrated his first season in the American League by winning the Most Valuable Player Award. An eight time Silver Slugger Award winner, Guerrero reached the 200-hit plateau four times in his career. Elected 2018

A multi-talented right fielder, Vladimir Guerrero combined power and average at the plate with speed on the bases and a terrific throwing arm in the field. A .318 lifetime hitter, Guerrero was a nine-time All-Star who hit 449 home runs over 16 seasons while never striking out more than 95 times in a season. Guerrero began his big league career with the Expos, topping the 40-home run mark in 1999 and 2000 while missing a 40 homer/40 steal season by one home run in 2002. After landing with the Angels via free agency in 2004, Guerrero celebrated his first season in the American League by winning the Most Valuable Player Award. An eight time Silver Slugger Award winner, Guerrero reached the 200-hit plateau four times in his career. Elected 2018

A star baseball and basketball player in college, Tony Gwynn opted for the diamond and fashioned a stellar 20-year career with the San Diego Padres. Gwynne's mastery of slapping the ball between the third baseman and shortstop- what lefty called the "5.5 hole" - propelled him to 3,141 career hits, a lifetime .338 hitting average and eight batting crowns, A National League record he shares with Honus Wagner. A true student of hitting, Gwynne was an early advocate of using videotape to study his swing, while his five outfield Gold Glove Awards, 319 career stolen bases and 15 All-Star Game selections attest to his superior all-around play.

"If (Chick) Haffey had good eyesight and good health," Branch Rickey said, "he might have been the finest right-handed hitter baseball has ever known." Charles "Chick" Haffey, a speedy line-drive hitting outfielder with the St. Louis Cardinals and Cincinnati Reds, was one of the first players to wear eyeglasses. Haffey's myriad hitting accomplishments included a five RBI inning, 10 consecutive hits over three games, six extra base hits in a doubleheader and two grand slams in one game. He won the 1931 National League batting title and hit .329 or better for six straight seasons. Elected 1971.

Jesse Haines was a fixture on the St. Louis Cardinals pitching staff for 18 seasons - the most in club history - earning the nickname "Pop." A hard throwing starter, Haines an unusually fast knuckleball, later becoming a dominant reliever. He pitched for five pennant winners before retiring at age 44. "When I saw how hard a nice old man like "Pop" took losing a game, I realized why he's been a consistent winner." remembered teammate Terry Moore. In game 3 of the 1926 World Series, Haines homered while shutting out the New York Yankees, and then won game 7 to secure the Cardinals first modern championship. Elected 1970.

When Bucky Harris, "The Boy Wonder," took over the helm of the lowly Washington Senators as a 27-year old player-manager in 1924, he promptly led the tea to its first two American League pennants and the 1924 World Series title, also hitting two homers and batting .333 in the Fall Classic. Harris' playing days ended in 1931 with the Detroit Tigers, but the managerial career continued on and off until 1956 with the Tigers, Senators, Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and New York Yankees. He won the second championship with the Yankees in 1947. Harris became the fourth major league manager to win 2,000 games and finished his career with 2,158 victories. Elected 1975.

Charles "Gabby" Hartnett excelled both behind the plate and at the plate, becoming the first backstop in history to slug 200 home runs and drive in 1,000 runs in a career. His catching prowess prompted pitcher Dizzy Dean to proclaim, "If I had that guy to pitch to all the time, I'd never lose a game." Hartnett, who spent 19 seasons with the Chicago Cubs - where he won four pennants - was named to the NL All-Star Game in the first six years the contest was held, starting behind the plate in 1934, 1936 and 1937. he also won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1935. Elected 1955.

A methodical, authoritative umpire in the National League for more than three decades, Doug Harvey became so revered that players, managers and even fellow umpires dubbed him "god." Harvey joined the Senior Circuits umpiring crew in 1962, the first umpire hired in the big leagues who did not attend umpires school. Working 4,673 games over 31 years - including 18 seasons as crew chief - Harvey often drew assignments in the game's biggest events, including six All-Star Games, nine National League Championship series and five World Series. Elected 2010.

Rickey Henderson, the "Man of Steal," blazed a trail across baseball with his baserunning and hitting ability. In 1982, Henderson set the modern major league record for stolen bases in a single season with 130. He went on to lead the American League in steals 12 times throughout his career and holds the all-time record with 1,406. He also tops the all-time lists in runs scored (2,295) and unintentional walks (2,129). Henderson - who played for nine teams - won the 1990 American League Most Valuable Player Award and took home World Series rings with the 1989 Athletics and the 1993 Blue Jays. Elected 2009.

William Jennings Bryan "Billy" Herman was the model for all National League second basemen in the 1930's and early 1940's. A smart player with great bat control, he mastered the hit-and-run and the bunt. Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher said Herman was, "universally accepted as the classic number two hitter...an absolute master of hitting behind a runner." Herman batted .304 for his career and was a 10-time All-Star. His hitting and solid defense let to three Chicago Cubs pennants in the 1930's and one with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941. Elected 1975.

A lifetime in baseball helped manager Whitey Herzog adapt his clubs to the modern game played on artificial turf, resulting in consistent success. After brief managerial posts in Texas and California, his Kansas City Royals and St. Louis Cardinals of the 1970's and 80's played "Whitey Ball," focusing on aggressive base running, sparkling defense and a strong bullpen. Herzog won three division titles in five years with Kansas City, and a trio of pennants and the 1982 World Series with the Cardinals. Managing for 16 big league seasons, Herzog retired with a record of 1,282 -1,125. Elected 2010.

Transitioning from a minor league infielder to a hard-throwing reliever, Trevor Hoffman became one of the most consistent pitchers of his era. When a third-career injury robbed him of his explosive fastball, Hoffman re-invented himself again with a knee-buckling changeup that extended his big league stardom. In 18 seasons, Hoffman saved 601 games - becoming the first pitcher to eclipse the 500 - and 600 save plateaus. The seven-time All-Star averaged better than a strikeout per inning, and he reached the 40-save mark nine times in his career. Elected 2018

Transitioning from a minor league infielder to a hard-throwing reliever, Trevor Hoffman became one of the most consistent pitchers of his era. When a third-career injury robbed him of his explosive fastball, Hoffman re-invented himself again with a knee-buckling changeup that extended his big league stardom. In 18 seasons, Hoffman saved 601 games - becoming the first pitcher to eclipse the 500 - and 600 save plateaus. The seven-time All-Star averaged better than a strikeout per inning, and he reached the 40-save mark nine times in his career. Elected 2018

The only man to be part of four World Series champion Boston Red Sox teams (1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918), Harry Hooper played outfield and led off. Babe Ruth once called the "greatest defensive right fielder." Hooper teamed with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis to form one of the finest outfields in major league history. The owner of an engineering degree, Hooper was originally lured to the Red Sox with the ultimately unfulfilled promise that he could help design Fenway Park. After his major league career came to a close, Hooper coached at Princeton University. Elected 1971.

The only man to be part of four World Series champion Boston Red Sox teams (1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918), Harry Hooper played outfield and led off. Babe Ruth once called the "greatest defensive right fielder." Hooper teamed with Tris Speaker and Duffy Lewis to form one of the finest outfields in major league history. The owner of an engineering degree, Hooper was originally lured to the Red Sox with the ultimately unfulfilled promise that he could help design Fenway Park. After his major league career came to a close, Hooper coached at Princeton University. Elected 1971.

Young Waite Hoyt spent two seasons as mascot wit the New York Giants while still a "schoolboy wonder" from Brooklyn. Later as a professional, he would find enormous success in the Bronx, helping the New York Yankees of the 1920's win six pennants during an eight-year span. Hoyt, who had excellent control, went on to pitch for five more teams, mainly in relief. A popular storyteller, Hoyt was one the first players to succeed as a broadcaster, and was the voice of the Cincinnati Reds from 1942 until 1965. He was called "The Merry Mortician" for one off-season job and later became an accomplished painter and writer. Elected 1969.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Master of the screwball, left-handed "King Carl" Hubbell was one of the best pitchers of the 1930's. Unflappable on the mound Hubbell became a national sensation for striking out five straight Hall of Famers in the 1934 All-Star Game: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin. From 1929 to 1937, the New York Giants' "Meal Ticket" averaged 20 wins, led the club to three pennants and won the National League Most Valuable Player Award twice. Waite Hoyt claimed, "Hubbell is the greatest pitcher in the league. Elected 1947.

One of Charlie Finley's "bonus babies" of the mid 1960's, Jim "Catfish" Hunter showed his brilliance in a May 1968 perfect game, the first hurled in the American League in 46 years. Hunter used control as his trump card and went on to fie consecutive 20-win seasons, never losing his laid-back, down-home attitude. "If I hadn't played baseball, I wanted to be a game warden or something," he claimed. Sadly, Hunter's life was cut short by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, the same disease that felled Lou Gehrig. Elected 1987.

Possibly the greatest high school athlete in New Jersey history, Monte Irvin was a five-tool baseball player who starred in the Negro Leagues with the Newark Eagles and in the Mexican League before becoming a National League star. A pioneer in the integration of Major League, Irvin debuted with the New York Giants in 1949 at the age of 30. A clutch hitter who particularly excelled I World Series contests, he was once lauded by Rory Campanella as "the best all-around player I ever saw." Elected 1973.

Reggie Jackson was among the most charismatic players ever to don a baseball uniform. One of the few athletes to have a candy bar named after him, Jackson backed up his celebrity persona with 563 home runs and 11 trips to the postseason - including five World Series titles - in a 21-season major league career. "Mr. October's" crowning moment came in Game 6 of the 1977 Fall Classic when he belted three home runs - on three consecutive pitches - against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Elected 1993.

Travis "Stonewall" Jackson was a vital cog in John McGraw's galaxy of stars that constituted the powerful New York Giants teams of the 1920's and early 1930's. The strong-armed infielder was considered "the greatest shortstop ever to play in New York," by legendary columnist Red Smith. An Arkansas native who joined the Giants as a teenager, Jackson eventually became team captain, succeeding Rogers Hornsby, who once praised him by saying, "I never saw him make a mistake."

Pitching in a era "when the manager gave you the ball and didn't expect it back until the game was over," Ferguson "Fergie" Jenkins name could perennially be found among the league's leaders in games won, complete games and innings pitched. The Canadian right-hander showcased a variety of pitches while amassing 284 victories during a 19-year career. However, control was Jenkins' chief asset. "My game plan is simple: I throw strikes and make 'em hit the ball. When I can do that, I'm on my way to a winning season." And there were plenty of those for the seven-time 20-game winner. Elected 1991.

A savvy mainstay of two of the greatest teams in Negro Leagues history, the Hilldales of the 1920's and the Pittsburgh Crawford's of the 1930's, Judy Johnson "was the smartest third baseman I ever came across," said teammate Tad Page. Jimmy Crutchfield said, "He has a great brain," while Newt Allen added, "He was a gentleman all through those years when baseball was just as rough as could be." The contact-hitting Johnson helped the Hilldales to a trio of Eastern Colored League pennants and later captained the legendary Crawford's. Elected 1975.

Over 22 big league seasons, Randy Johnson won 303 games - the fifth-best total among all left-handers at the time of his retirement. The 6 foot 10 inch Johnson won the 1995 American League Cy Young Award with the Mariners and four straight National League Cy Young Awards with the Diamondbacks from 1999-2002. A fearsome competitor and 10-time All-Star, Johnson led his league in strikeouts nine times, mixing a blistering fastball with a darting slider. He shared World Series MVP honors with Diamondbacks teammate Curt Schilling after going 3-0 in the 2001 Fall Classic, leading Arizona to a seven-game victory over the Yankees. Elected 2015.

A switch-hitting third baseman, Chipper Jones was the heart of the Braves lineup during a stretch when Atlanta won 11 consecutive NL East titles, three NL pennants and the 1995 World Series. An eight time All-Star and the 1999 NL MVP, Jones - the No. 1 overall pick in the 1990 MLB draft - drove in 100-or-more runs eight times, totaled 468 home runs and won the 2008 NL batting title with a .364 average. Jones retired as one of only nine players in big league history with at least 400 home runs, a .300 batting average, a .400 on-base percentage and a .500 slugging percentage. Elected 2018.

A switch-hitting third baseman, Chipper Jones was the heart of the Braves lineup during a stretch when Atlanta won 11 consecutive NL East titles, three NL pennants and the 1995 World Series. An eight time All-Star and the 1999 NL MVP, Jones - the No. 1 overall pick in the 1990 MLB draft - drove in 100-or-more runs eight times, totaled 468 home runs and won the 2008 NL batting title with a .364 average. Jones retired as one of only nine players in big league history with at least 400 home runs, a .300 batting average, a .400 on-base percentage and a .500 slugging percentage. Elected 2018.

Al Kaline featured a rifle arm and a lethal bat in his repertoire throughout a 22-year major league career, all with the Detroit Tigers. "Mr. Tiger" was highly respected by both colleagues and fans. "The kid murders you with his speed and arm," enthused Casey Stengel. Ted Williams added of Kaline, "He's the best right handed hitter in the (American) league." Kaline was named to 18 All-Star teams, won 10 Gold Glove Awards and totaled 3,007 hits. He was a key cog on the Tigers 1968 World Series championship team. Elected 1980.

George Kell worked diligently on all facets of the game to become a superb batter, sure-handed fielder and all around leader, culminating in a 1949 American League batting championship, when he beat out Ted Williams by .0002 and denied Williams his third Triple Crown. Kell batted .300 nine times and topped all AL third basemen in fielding percentage seven times, also pacing the circuit in double plays two times, assists four times and putouts twice. "You never stop watching, and you never stop learning." said Kell. Elected 1983

Considered exceedingly tall for his era, George Kelly was alternately referred to as "Highpockets" or "Long George." The fancy-fielding first baseman used his height to its full advantage, snagging many errant tosses and making an already stellar New York Giants infield much better. A key contributor to four consecutive pennants (1921-1924), Kelly was a consistent run producer once described by John McGraw as having "more important hits for me than any other player I ever had." Kelly was also a streaky power hitter who in 1924 stroked seven home runs in a six-game span. Elected 1973.

Harmon Killebrew epitomized raw power. His quiet demeanor contradicted an awesome presences at the plate, deserving of the nickname "Killer." "I did have power," he explained. In 22 major league seasons Killebrew blasted 573 home runs, including many monumental blows estimated at more than 500 feet. The 13-time All-Star was one of the first sluggers to receive intentional walks with the bases empty and captured the 1969 American League MVP Award, leading the circuit with 49 home runs and 140 RBI. Elected 1984.

During his 10-year career, Ralph Kiner hit 369 home runs willing or sharing the National League home run title in each of his first seven seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He twice topped 50 homers, with 51 in 1947 and 54 in 1949, and averaged more than 100 RBI each season of his abbreviated major league run, cut short by continuing back ailments. A three-time NL leader in slugging percentage, Kiner transitioned to the broadcast booth in 1962 for New York Mets telecasts, garnering a large fan following. Elected 1975.

An overpowering left-hander, Sandy Koufax enjoyed a six-year stretch as perhaps the most dominating pitcher in the game's history. Koufax captured five straight ERA titles and set a modern record with 382 strikeouts in 1965. His fastball and devastating curve enabled him to pitch no-hitters in four consecutive seasons, including a perfect game in 1965. He posted a 0.95 ERA in four World Series, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers to three championships. Hall of Fame slugger Willie Stargell once said: "Trying to hit (Koufax) was like trying to drink coffee with a fork." Elected 1972.

Cincinnati native Barry Larkin was a premier five-tool shortstop for almost two decades, all with his hometown Reds, including seven years as captain. The 12-time All-Star's outstanding range and arm made him a top defender, while he earned nine Silver Slugger Awards with his hitting. Larkin batted .353 in the 1990 World Series as the reads swept the heavily favored A's. In 1995, he hit .379 with 51 stolen bases and was voted NL MVP. The following season Larkin combined power and speed, becoming the first shortstop to top 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in the same year. Elected 2012

After a humble playing career with three big league clubs, Tony LaRussa found his true calling as an extremely successful manger for more than three decades with the White Sox (1979-1986), Athletics (1986-1995) and Cardinals (1996-2011). He logged 12 first-place finishes, six pennants (1988-1990, 2004, 2006 and 2011) and three World Series titles (1989, 2006, 2011). His 2,728 career wins rank third all time behind legends Connie Mack and John McGraw. La Russa retired on a high note after his underdog Cardinals' seven-game victory over the Dodgers in the 2011 World Series. Elected 2014.

Tommy Lasorda began his career as a left-handed pitcher before becoming one of the most successful managers in baseball history. The jovial Lasorda managed the Los Angeles Dodgers to seven division titles and two World Series championships in 21 seasons. After retiring, Lasorda became a Dodgers executive, extending his association with the club to seven decades. In 2000, he managed the U.S. Olympic baseball team to its first ever gold medal. In 2008, Lasorda skippered the Dodgers for several Spring Training games, among them the club's final appearance at Dodgertown in Vero Beach, FL. Elected 1997.

Although Bob Lemon debuted in the major leagues as a position player, mangers recognized his strong throwing arm and transformed the outfielder into a major league pitcher. During one nine-year span, Lemon logged seven 20-win seasons and helped propel the Cleveland Indians' 1948 and 1954 pennant drives. Lemon later became a successful manager, leading the New York Yankees to a World Series victory in 1978. New York Times sportswriter Steve Cady once wrote, "The line on Lemon is that the next person to say something bad about him will be the first." Elected 1976.

A smooth-fielding first baseman for the Homestead Grays dynasty of the late 1930's and 1940's, Walter "Buck" Leonard teamed with Josh Gibson to form an offensive combination called the "Ruth and Gehrig" of black baseball. Leonard played in a record 11 East-West All-Star Games, and his 17-year tenure with the Grays was the longest term of service with one team in Negro Leagues history. Eddie Gottlieb, an instrumental figure in forming the National Basketball Association, once said: "Buck Leonard as smooth a first baseman as I ever saw. A great glove, a heck of a hitter, and he drove in runs." Elected 1972.

In 1922, at the age of 16, Fred "Lindy" Lindstrom hit .304 in 18 games at Toledo. Two years later, he became the youngest player to appear in a World Series game, playing for the New York Giants. Although Lindstrom had a powerful arm and good range, hitting was always his forte - he compiled a lifetime .311 batting average. A fan favorite, Lindstrom's quick wit and confidence made him one of the few players who dared to talk back to manager John McGraw. A week after Lindstrom's death, his son Andy wrote: "He did with ease what the rest of us could not even comprehend." Elected 1976.

Al Lopez was just 17 when he impressed Walter Johnson, baseball's best pitcher of the day, as a minor league catcher. His major league career would span a record 1,918 games - an unmatched mark for backstops for more than 40 years. From 1951 to 1959, as manager of the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox, Lopez won two pennants and finished second to the New York Yankees the other seven years. His 1954 Cleveland squad won 111 games, an American League record that lasted 44 years. In 1959, he led the "Go-Go" White Sox to their first pennant since 1919. Elected 1977.

Al Lopez was just 17 when he impressed Walter Johnson, baseball's best pitcher of the day, as a minor league catcher. His major league career would span a record 1,918 games - an unmatched mark for backstops for more than 40 years. From 1951 to 1959, as manager of the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox, Lopez won two pennants and finished second to the New York Yankees the other seven years. His 1954 Cleveland squad won 111 games, an American League record that lasted 44 years. In 1959, he led the "Go-Go" White Sox to their first pennant since 1919. Elected 1977.

Tris Speaker once declared, "If I had the choice for any pitcher for a clutch game, the guy I'd pick would be Ted Lyons." Nearly every Sunday afternoon, Ted Lyons would take the mound for the Chicago White Sox, and the result was almost always the same; a victory.. Lyon, who won 260 games, abandoned his law school plans by signing with Chicago in 1923 and became a top draw for the club for 21 years. After a World War II stint in the Marines, Lyons returned to manage the Sox for three seasons. Elected 1955.

Following in his father's Hall of Fame footsteps, Lee MacPhail served as a front office executive for 45 years. As a director of player personnel for the New York Yankees, MacPhail built one of the game's strongest farm systems. During his tenure, the Yankees won seven World Series championships in 10 years. In 1966, MacPhail was named Major League Executive of the Year. He then served as American League president for 10 years, earning praise for his logic and mediation skills, and later became the head of the Player Relations Committee, representing owners in arbitration, free agency and collective bargaining. Elected 1998.

Greg Maddux dazzled with his right arm, not his physique, making batters curse their fate. Showing mind boggling control for 23 seasons split mostly between the Cubs and Braves, the durable hurler spent only 15 days on the disabled list. At his best from 1992 to 1995, Maddux captured four consecutive NL Cy Young Awards, going 75-29 with a 1.98 ERA. The eight time All-Star collected a record 18 Golden Glove Awards and retired in 2008 with 355 wins, eight-most all time, while logging 3,371 strikeouts. Elected 2014,

"You're going to be a great player, kid," said Jackie Robinson to Mickey Mantle after the 1952 World Series. Mantle was a star from the start,; his talent and boyish good looks earned him iconic status. Despite a series of devastating injuries, Mantle accumulated a long list of impressive accomplishments, finishing his 18-year career with 536 home runs and a .298 batting average. When healthy, Mantle was an excellent defensive outfielder - lightning fast, with a strong and accurate arm. The switch-hitter won three MVP Awards and a Triple Crown, contributing to 12 pennants and seven World Series titles for the New York Yankees, all while establishing numerous Fall Classic records. Elected 1974.

Henry Emmett "Heinie" Manush was one of seven sons, six of whom played professional baseball. A left-handed, line drive hitting outfielder, Manush consistently ranked among the game's top batters. In 1926, he hit .378 to lead the American League, and his lifetime average was .330 over a 17-year career. In a 1977 interview, Joe Cronin said of Manush, "If he'd catch 'em playing back, he'd dump a bunt. If they moved in on him, Heinie slapped the ball by 'em." Elected 1964.

The pride of the Dominican Republic, Juan Antonio Marichal Sanchez won 243 games and lost only 142 during 16 major league seasons. Hank Aaron once explained, "He can throw all day within a two inch space - in, out, up or down. I've never seen anyone as good as that." The high-kicking right-hander enjoyed six 20-win seasons, earning 10 All-Star Game selections. The "Dominican Dandy" twice led the National League in complete games, shutouts and wins, completing 244 games during his career while fanning 2,303 and compiling a 2.89 ERA. After his playing days, Marichal became Minister of Sports in his homeland. Elected 1983.

In 1908, the New York Giants paid a then-record $11,000 for the contract of minor league southpaw Richard "Rube" Marquard. Three years later, he would lead the team to its first of three straight pennants (1911-1913). In 1912., Marquard earned victories inn his first 19 decisions, finishing the season - and leading the National League - with 26 wins. In 1915, Marquard no-hit the Brooklyn Dodgers before brokering his own sale to the club, helping them win the NL pennant the following year. A three-time 20-game winner, Marquard once said of his off-speed pitching style, "Any hitter can hit a fast one, but not many can hit slow ones." Elected 1971.

Pedro Martinez won three Cy Young Awards (1997, 1999-2000) and five earned-run average titles, en route to becoming the second native of the Dominican Republic to be elected to the Hall of Fame. With a blazing fastball and knee-buckling change-up, Martinez led his league I strikeouts three times, earning eight All-Star selections. In seven seasons with the Red Sox, Martinez was 117-37 with a 2.52 ERA, helping Boston end an 86-year drought by winning game 3 of the 2004 World Series that the Boston Red Sox went on to sweep. He is the only pitcher in MLB history with at least 3,000 strikeouts (3,154) with fewer than 3,000 innings pitched. Elected 2015.

A feared left-handed slugger, Eddie Mathews became the seventh player in major league history to hit 500 home runs, finishing his career with 512. He walloped more than 30 round-trippers in nine straight seasons. in 1953, his 47 home runs for the Milwaukee Braves led the National League and established a single season record for third baseman that lasted 27 years. Ty Conn once said, "I've known three or four perfect swings in my time. This boy's got one of them." Mathews was a member of two World Series championship teams (1957 and 1968), and in August 1954 was featured on the cover of the inaugural Sports Illustrated. Elected 1978.

Willie Mays, the "Say Hey Kid", excelled at all phases of the game with a boyish enthusiasm and infectious exuberance. His staggering career statistics totaled 3,283 hits and 660 home runs. "You used to think if the score was 5-0, he'd hit a five run home run," recalled Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson. The New York Giants superstar earned National League Rookie of the Year in 1951 and two NL MVP Awards (1954 and 1965). He accumulated 12 Gold Glove Awards and played in a record tying 24 All-Star Games. His catch of Vic Wertz's deep fly ball in the 1954 World Series remains one of baseball's memorable moments. Elected 1979.

In 1954, 17-year old Bill Mazerowski signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates as a shortstop and was promptly moved to second base two years later. Mazerowski made his major league debut for Pittsburgh where he would spend his entire career. He was one of the best defensive second baseman in history, posting a lifetime .983 fielding percentage. The 10-time National League All-Star led his league in assists nice times, fielding percentage three times and double plays eight times. A consistent batter who pounded out 2,016 career hits, "Maz" achieved iconic status in the 1960 World Series, when he became the first player to end a series game with a home run. Elected 2001

Joe McCarthy, the New York Yankees manager of the 1930s and early 1940s, finished his 24-year major league career with an all-time best winning percentage of .615 to go along with 2,125 wins. After winning one pennant with the Chicago Cubs, McCarthy won eight at the helm of the Yankees. Included in that were seven World Series championships, four of the consecutive, from 1936 to 1939. On six occasions, his teams won 100 or more games in a season. "I don't know where he learned all his psychology about ballplayers. He could handle almost anybody." claimed former Yankee outfielder Tommy Henrich. Elected 1957.

Although Willie McCovey played injured throughout much of his 22-year career, primarily with the San Francisco Giants, the first baseman nevertheless used a sweeping swing to belt 521 home runs and collect 2,211 hits. hall of Fame manager Sparky Anderson once said, ""If you pitch to him, he'll ruin baseball. He'd hit 80 home runs. There's no comparison between McCovey and anyone else in the league." McCovey led the National League in homers three times and RBI twice. A six-time All-Star selection, McCovey earned NL MVP honors in 1969, 10 years after winning the league's Rookie of the Year Award. Elected 1986.

Tough and gruff, outfielder Joe Medwick's competitive spirit typified the rowdy "Gashouse Gang" Cardinals of the 1930s. Van Lingle Mungo claimed, "No game is ever won against the Cardinals until Medwick is out in the ninth." "Ducky" batted .300 or better in his first 11 seasons and ended his 17-year career with a .324 batting average. He also collected 1,383 career RBI - topping the National League for three consecutive seasons (1936-1938). In 1937, he won the MVP Award by capturing the Triple Crown and leading the senior circuit in nine other categories. Elected 1968.

Tough and gruff, outfielder Joe Medwick's competitive spirit typified the rowdy "Gashouse Gang" Cardinals of the 1930s. Van Lingle Mungo claimed, "No game is ever won against the Cardinals until Medwick is out in the ninth." "Ducky" batted .300 or better in his first 11 seasons and ended his 17-year career with a .324 batting average. He also collected 1,383 career RBI - topping the National League for three consecutive seasons (1936-1938). In 1937, he won the MVP Award by capturing the Triple Crown and leading the senior circuit in nine other categories. Elected 1968.

Johnny Mize, the burly first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and New York Yankees, paced or tied for the National League lead in home runs four times, hitting three in a single game on six occasions. The 10-time All-Star also won three RBI crowns and one batting championship. After the "Big Cat" joined the Yankees, they won five consecutive World Series titles (1949-1953), with Mize batting .400 and hitting three homers in the 1952 Fall Classic. He finished his career with 359 home runs and a .312 batting average. Elected 1981.

Paul Molitor's career was forged on his strength of collecting base hits, versatility in the field and savvy on the base paths. As a member of the Milwaukee Brewers, Toronto Blue Jays and Minnesota Twins, the seven-time All-Star batted better than .300 in 12 seasons, fashioning a 39-game hitting streak in 1987. Molitor collected a record five hits for Milwaukee in game 1 of the 1982 World Series and, 11 years later, earned World Series MVP honors with Toronto. Appearing in more than 400 games at three different positions, Molitor totaled 3,319 hits, 504 stolen bases and 605 doubles. Elected 2004.

A fierce competitor renowned for his baseball smarts, Joe Morgan could almost single-handedly beat opposing teams. A two-time NL MVP (1975 and 1976), he was a terror on the basepaths, reaching the 40-steal plateau nine times. His superior batting eye enabled him to lead the NL in on-base percentage and walks four times each. The five time Gold-Glove Award winner packed considerable power into his compact frame, hitting 449 doubles and 268 home runs, a record among second basemen when he retired. Elected 1990

The owner of a devastating split-fingered fastball, Jack Morris led his teams to four World Series championships over 18 seasons. Morris, a five-time All-Star, earned 14 straight Opening Day assignments and let the American League in victories twice. The ace of the dominant Tigers teams of the 1980's, he later authored on of the game's signature pitching performances in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series for the Twins, hurling 10 shutout innings and earning the victory in a 1-0 Minnesota triumph - winning the World Series MVP Award. His 162 wins in the 1980's were more than any other pitcher during that decade. Elected 2018.

The owner of a devastating split-fingered fastball, Jack Morris led his teams to four World Series championships over 18 seasons. Morris, a five-time All-Star, earned 14 straight Opening Day assignments and let the American League in victories twice. The ace of the dominant Tigers teams of the 1980's, he later authored on of the game's signature pitching performances in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series for the Twins, hurling 10 shutout innings and earning the victory in a 1-0 Minnesota triumph - winning the World Series MVP Award. His 162 wins in the 1980's were more than any other pitcher during that decade. Elected 2018.

Consistency, durability and dominance characterized the career of Eddie Clarence Murphy, one of baseball's most productive hitters from the late 1970s through the 1990s. Murray is one of only four players to have totaled both 3,000 hits and 500 home runs. The all-time career RBI leader among switch-hitters - and a three time Gold Glove Award winner at first base - Murray was an eight-time All-Star with six consecutive top-10 finishes in voting for the MVP Award. Murray was a stalwart at first base for 13 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles, capturing a World Series championship in 1983. Elected 2003.

"Here stands baseball's perfect warrior. Here stands baseball's perfect knight," once proclaimed Ford C. Frick of Stan Musial. After 22 years with the St. Louis Cardinals, Musial ranked at or near the top of baseball's all-time lists in nearly every offensive category,. He topped the .300 mark in 17 consecutive seasons and won seven National League batting titles with his famed "corkscrew" stance and ringing line drives. A three-time MVP, "The Man" played in 24 All-Star Games and was a member of three World Series championship teams. In 1948, Musial feel a home run shy of capturing the Triple Crown. In 2011, Musial was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Elected 1969.

Michael Cole Mussina (born December 8, 1968), nicknamed "Moose", is an American former baseball starting pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1991–2000) and the New York Yankees (2001–2008). In 2019, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his sixth year of eligibility. Mussina spent his entire career in the American League East, won at least 11 games in 17 consecutive seasons – an American League record – and recorded a career .638 winning percentage. Among pitchers, he ranks 33rd in all-time wins (270),[1] 33rd in games started (535), 66th in innings pitched (3,562.2), 19th in strikeouts (2,813), and 23rd all-time in pitching Wins Above Replacement (82.9). A five-time All-Star and seven-time Gold Glove winner, Mussina's consistency resulted in six top-five finishes in the voting for his league's Cy Young Award.

A Michigan native, Hal Newhouser's dream was to pitch for the Detroit Tigers. "Prince Hal" would spend 15 of 17 seasons with his hometown team, inning 207 games and back-to-back MVP Awards in 1944 and 1945. The left handed pitcher punished batters throughout the 1940s, leading the major leagues in wins, complete games, shutouts, innings and strikeouts during the decade. Newhouser helped Detroit win the 1945 World Series, earning two victories, including the decisive game 7. "He's not the gentlest character out there," said former batterymate Birdie Tebbetts, "but he wants to win. I know a lot of pleasant guys who never win." Elected 1992.

It takes a special weapon to pitch nearly a quarter of a century in the majors, and Phil Niekro's was the knuckleball. The pitch helped, "Knucksie" record 318 wins, 3,342 strikeouts and a 3.35 ERA during a 24-year career spent mostly with the Atlanta Braves. Niekro's famed pitch bewildered batters, Rick Monday once said, "The knuckleball actually giggles at your as it goes by," while Bobby Mercer recalled that "trying to hit him is like trying to eat Jell-O with chopsticks." Bob Uecker that catching Niekro was rewarding: "I got to meet a lot of important people, they all sit behind home plate."

"Satchel" Paige was one of the most entertaining pitchers in major league history. A tall, lanky fireballers, he was arguably the hardest thrower in the Negro Leagues, as well as one of the greatest gate attractions. James "Cool Papa" Bell, once declared, "He made his living by throwing the ball to a spot over the plate the size of a matchbox." In the 1930s, Paige barnstormed around the continent, baffling the hitters with creatively named pitches like the "Bat Dodger" and "Hesitation Pitch." In 1948, on his 42nd birthday, Paige's contract was sold to the Cleveland Indians, making him the oldest player to debut in the major leagues. Elected 1971.

Jim Palmer was a "big game" pitcher for nearly two decades, helping the Baltimore Orioles to eight postseason appearances, six pennants and three World Series titles. Using his trademark high kick and smooth delivery, Palmer retired with 268 victories, eight 20-win seasons and three Cy Young Awards. Said Palmer on being elected to the Hall of Fame, "I'm here because I played for the Baltimore Orioles. I was surrounded by great players. We had the kind of teams that, if you would get in shape and get out there, you'd win close to 20 games every season." Elected 1990.

On a club full of stars, Atanasio "Tony" Perez Rigal was considered the most clutch hitter for Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s. Longtime opponent Willie Stargell once said, "With men in scoring position, and the game on the line, Tony's the last guy an opponent wanted to see." The Cuba native was a seven-time All-Star selection and ended his 23-year career with 1,652 RBI, 505 doubles and 379 home runs, while helping to propel the Reds to two World Series championships (1975 and 1976). Elected 2000.

Gaylord Perry won 314 games, struck out 3,534 batters, earned Cy Young Awards in both leagues and hurled a no-hitter during his 22-yea major league career with eight teams. But the spitball - or more accurately, the threat of one - gave Perry his everlasting fame. The author of "Me and the Spitter" could distract and frustrate through an array of rituals on the mound, including fidgeting with his glove, uniform and bill of his cap. When Perry retired in 1983, he proclaimed, "The league will be a little drier now, folks." Elected 1991.

From 62nd round draft pick, to Cooperstown, Mike Piazza traveled a road none had taken. By the time he retired, Piazza could lay claim to being one of the greatest hitting catchers in history. Piazza burst on the scene in 1993, winning National League Rookie of the Year honors after hitting .318 with 35 home runs and 112 RBI. Following five stellar seasons with the Dodgers that included two runner-up finishes in the NL MVP Award voting, Piazza was traded to the Marlines and then to the Mets, where he led New York to the 2000 National League pennant. In 16 big league seasons, Piazza hit 427 home runs - including a record 396 as a catcher. He was named to 12 All-Star Games and won 10 Silver Slugger Awards. Elected 2016.

Kirby Puckett was beloved by teammates and opponents alike. A gregarious player with a passion for baseball, Puckett led the Minnesota Twins to two World Series titles with clutch hitting and defense. He was a 10-time All-Star and won six Gold Glove Awards, hitting .318 lifetime. Puckett's 12-year career was prematurely ended due to irreversible retinal damage in his right eye. "In 1991, playing against him in the World Series, if we had to lose and if one person basically was the reason, you don't mind it being Kirby Puckett," Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz said of the Twins' iconic hero. Elected 2001.

Featuring a rarely seen combination of power and speed, Time Raines defined the modern leadoff hitter. Raines stole at ;east 70 bases in each of his first six big league seasons, winning the 1986 NL batting title along the way. With a .385 career on-base percentage, Raines kept the pressure on opponents by succeeding in 84.7 percent of his stolen base attempts - the top figure of any player with at least 400 steals. In each of four seasons from 1983-86, Raines stole at least 70 bases, totaled at least 50 extra base hits and posted an on-base percentage of .390 or better - exactly half of the eight seasons like that in baseball history. A seven-time All-Star, Raines finished his career with 808 steals, fifth most of all-time. Elected 2017.

Harold "Pee Wee" Reese captained the dominant Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the 1950s - a symbol of strength and unity both on and off the field. An outstanding defensive player, Reese led the National League in put-outs four times, double plays twice, fielding percentage and assists once each, while forming one of baseball's top double-paly combinations with Jackie Robinson. Their relationship drew national attention during Robinson's 1947 barrier-breaking season when Reese offered public support to baseball's first modern African-American teammate. Elected 1984.

Jim Rice's 16-year career in Boston continued a legacy of renowned Red Sox left fielders that included Ted Williams and Carl Yastrzemski. One of the most feared right-handed hitters of his era, Rice clubbed at least 20 homers in 11 of his first 12 full seasons and led the American League in total bases four times, homers three times, and RBI and slugging percentage twice each. The powerfully built eight-time All-Star amassed 2,452 hits, a .298 batting average, 382 home runs and 1,451 RBI. Rice captured the junior circuit's MVP Award in 1978, when he collected 406 total bases - the most in the AL in more than 40 years. Elected 2009.

Edgar C. "Sam" Rice could do wonderful things with a bat - like tallying 2,987 career hits. Longtime American League rival Ty Cobb said of Rice, "You couldn't appreciate Sam Rice enough unless you played against him." Rice's disputed catch in the 1925 World Series saved game 3 for the Washington Senators and remains one of baseball's most controversial plays. In a letter not to be opened until after his death, Rice wrote, in part, "I had a death grip on it. At no time did I lose possession of the ball." Elected 1963.

Cal Ripken Jr. gave new meaning to the phrase "everyday player." From May 30, 1982 through September 19, 1998, the lanky shortstop played in 2,632 consecutive games for the Orioles, shattering Lou Gehrig's "unbreakable" mark of 2,130. Beyond "The Streak," however, Ripken methodically put together a remarkable career, notching 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, 19 straight All-Star appearances and two MVP Awards. Though his solid, steady play earned him hero status throughout America, Ripken also had a fair for the dramatic, homering in both his record-setting 2,131st consecutive game and his final All-Star game. Elected 2007.

Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969) is a Panamanian-American former professional baseball pitcher who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1995 to 2013. Nicknamed "Mo" and "Sandman", he spent most of his career as a relief pitcher and served as the Yankees' closer for 17 seasons. A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB's career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952). Rivera won five American League (AL) Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards, and he finished in the top three in voting for the AL Cy Young Award four times. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as part of its class of 2019 in his first year of eligibility, and was the first player ever to be elected unanimously by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA).

Shortstop Phil Rizzuto as an integral part of the New York Yankees teams in the 1940s and 1950s, which won nine pennants and seven World Series titles. Ted Williams once said, "If the Red Sox would have had Phil, we would have won all those pennants." Joe DiMaggio claimed Rizzuto "held the team together." While "Scooter" could handle a bat, notably hitting .324 to win the 1950 AL MVP Award, his defense might have been more important. "My best pitch," teammate Vic Raschi said, "is anything the batter grounds, lines or pops up in the direction of Rizzuto." Elected 1994.

Longtime Philadelphia Phillies ace Robin Roberts used speed and control to dominate National League hitters throughout the 1950s. "He looks like the kind of pitcher you can't wait to swing at, but you swing and the ball isn't where you thought it was," said Hall of Famer Willie Stargell. Roberts totaled 286 career wins, including a stretch of six straight 20-win seasons. "He keeps you off balance with his various change of speeds," said NL manager Harry Walker. "When you think you have him solved and are ready to cut yourself loose, boom comes the fastball. Faster than you think." Elected 1976

As sportswriter Jim Murray declared, "When Brooks Robinson retires, he's going to take third base with him." Nicknamed "The Human Vacuum Cleaner" for his fielding prowess, Robinsons career - spent entirely with the Baltimore Orioles - resulted in 18 All-Star selections, 16 Gold Glove Awards and 288 career home runs - a then record for American League third basemen. He starred in the 1970 World Series, hitting .429, making a host of defensive gems and winning the MVP Award. "I once thought of giving him some tips but dropped the idea," said fellow Hall of Fame third baseman Pie Traynor. "He's just the best there is." Elected 1983.

A major league player, manager, coach, executive and broadcaster, Frank Robinson has done it all. A two-time MVP (once in each league), Robinson was an aggressive outfielder and hard-charging base runner. "Frank was a great player," Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax said, "He had great tools, and he had great desire. He beat you any way he could." The 1986 American League Triple Crown winner, Robinson concluded his career with 586 home runs and just 57 hits shy of 3,000. His intelligence and leadership helped him become the major leagues' first African-American manager when he was named player-manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1975. Elected 1982.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

In 1947 Jackie Robinson would break the major leagues' "unwritten" color barrier in baseball debuting with the Brooklyn Dodgers and becoming the first black player in the 20th century. Robinson was selected by Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey not only for the skills he brought to the field, but also for those he possessed off it. The Dodgers picked the right player as while you can sure the way fans and players treated him it hurt him by season end he would win them over leading the way for other players. In 1997, Robinson was honored posthumously when Major League Baseball universally retired his uniform number 42. Elected 1962.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed "Pudge" and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times. Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles - the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year's MVP Award. Elected 2017.

Ivan Rodriguez was one of the most celebrated catchers in baseball history at the plate or behind it. Nicknamed "Pudge" and featuring a rocket arm that brought him to the big leagues, Rodriguez won 13 Gold Glove Awards and was named to 14 All-Star Games in his 21 MLB seasons. While leading his league in caught stealing percentage a record nine times. Rodriguez also totaled 2,844 hits and 572 doubles - the top totals of any catcher in history. The 1999 American League MVP with the Rangers, Rodriguez moved on to the Marlins, where he led the team to the 2003 World Series title while winning that year's MVP Award. Elected 2017.

One of the best line-drive hitters in history, Edd Roush swung a heavy bat and seldom struck out. His speed proved an asset in the field and on the basepaths. A shrewd businessman and a good baseball mind, Roush invested wisely and was independently wealthy by the time he retired. Contract squabbles often kept Roush from Spring Training, but he kept himself in such phenomenal shape year-round that manager Pat Moran once said, "All that fella has to do is wash his hands, adjust his cap and he's in shape to hit. Elected 1962.

Charles Herbert "Red" Ruffing anchored six New York Yankees World Series championship teams in the 1930s and early 1940s. He was a player who teammate and Hall of Fame catcher, Bill Dickey described as "the best pitcher (I) ever caught." Though Ruffing lost four toes on his left foot in a mining accident as a teenager, he successfully transitioned from outfielder to pitcher. A veteran of World War II, Ruffing continued his baseball career as a manager, coach and scout for a multitude of teams in organized baseball. Elected 1967.

With a dominating fastball and an unsurpassed work ethic, Nolan Ryan's career spanned four decades and culminated with an MLB-record 5,714 strikeouts. Ryan threw so hard - and could be so wild - that Reggie Jackson described him as "the only guy who could put fear in me. Not because he could get me out, but because he could kill me. You just hoped to mix in a walk so you could have a good night and go 0-for-3." Often among the league leaders in strikeouts, Ryan won 324 games and pitched a major league record seven no-hitters, three more that any other hurler in history. As team president of the Texas Rangers from 2008 until 2013, Ryan led the franchise to its first two World Series appearances (2010 and 2011). Elected 1999.

Dazzling defensive prowess and tremendous power earned Ryan Sandberg 10 consecutive All-Star appearances during 16 major league seasons. His amazing range and strong, accurate throwing arm produced nine straight Gold Glove Awards from 1983 to 1991. In 1984, Sandberg led the Chicago Cubs to their first post-season appearance since 1945, winning the NL MVP Award. He retired with 282 career home runs, 277 as a second baseman - then the most ever at the position. Elected 2005.

A symbol of durability and toughness, diminutive Ray Schalk was a defensive standout and an innovator at his position. Schalk is credited as one of the first catchers to back up plays at first and third base, and continuously caught 100-or-more games per season. A skilled receiver, he caught the 1920 Chicago White Sox staff, which featured four 20-game winners. He also was the first backstop to catch four no-hitters. Schalk retired after 18 seasons as owner of a slew of defensive records. He went on to manage, coach and scout for numerous professional and amateur baseball teams. Elected 1955.

Tremendous power and a keen batting eye led Hall of Fame pitcher Bruce Sutter to call Mike Schmidt "the best hitter in the game." In 1980, the 12-time All-Star won his first of three NL MVP Awards, leading the Philadelphia Phillies to their first-ever World Series title. His flair for dramatic and mammoth clouts resulted in 548 career home runs, while steady fielding earned him 10 Gold Glove Awards - including nine straight - at third base. Elected 1995.

Credited by roommate Stan Musial as having "the greatest pair of hands I've ever seen," Albert "Red" Schoendienst forged a 19-year career as a slick fielding second baseman with the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and Milwaukee Braves, earning 10 All-Star selections. Schoendienst led the National League in fielding percentage seven times and also hit .300 or better on seven occasions. As a rookie in 1945, he led the league in stolen bases. Schoendienst has spent more than seven decades in uniform - as a player, coach, manager and Spring Training coach. As a manager he twice piloted the Cardinals to the World Series, winning the championship in 1967. Elected 1989.

The architect of state-of-the-art teams in both Kansas City and Atlanta, John Schuerholz switched careers in his mid-20s - going from middle school teacher to front office executive. After learning on the job with the Orioles in the late 1960s, Schuerholz joined the expansion Royals and helped lay the groundwork for one of the most consistent teams of the late 1970s and early '80s. He became the youngest general manager in baseball in 1981 with the Royals, fine-tuning the roster into the club that would win the 1985 World Series. Moving to Atlanta in 1990, Schuerholz quickly turned the Braves into a National League powerhouse, and from 1991-99 won five NL pennants and the 1995 World Series - making him the first GM in history to capture World Series titles in both leagues. Leading the Braves to 14 straight postseason appearances from 1991-2005, Schuerholz established himself as one of the game's top talent evaluators. Elected 2017.

Sparky Anderson once said, "My idea of managing is giving the ball to Tom Seaver and then sitting down and watching him work." Seaver, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps, pitched for the summer league Alaska Goldpanners and attending the University of Southern California before inking his first professional contract. Obtained by the New York Mets in a special draft lottery, "Tom Terrific" helped change the team from lovable losers into the "Miracle Mets" of 1969, when he won his first of three NL Cy Young Awards. He also earned the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year Award and garnered 12 All-Star selections. Elected 1992.

Over 23 years as MLB's commissioner, Alan H. "Bud" Selig guided baseball through some of the most significant changes in the game's history. As the owner of the Milwaukee Brewers throughout the 1970s and 80s, Selig became one of baseball's leading voices. He took over as acting commissioner in 1992 and then accepted the permanent position in 1998, serving more seasons as the MLB's leader as anyone except Kennesaw Mountain Landis. Under Selig, MLB enjoyed 20-plus years of labor peace following the 1994-95 strike and experienced a ballpark boom that featured almost two dozen new stadiums. Selig retired Jackie Robinson's No. 42 throughout baseball in 1997, oversaw MLB's expansion into three divisions per league along with the Postseason addition of Wild Cards, and helped establish the toughest anti-drug measures in all of sport. Elected 2017.

Sportswriter Bob Broeg regarded Joe Sewell as "a maestro with the bat." One of three brothers to play major league ball, Sewell was the toughest batter to strike out in major league history, fanning just 114 times in 7,132 at-bats. A graduate of the University of Alabama, Sewell made his major league debut during the Cleveland Indians' pennant drive in 1920 - after playing fewer than 100 professional games. Sewell would coach the New York Yankees and scout for the New York Mets and Cleveland Indians before becoming a public relations practitioner for a dairy farm - and later managed his alma mater's baseball program. Elected 1977.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

In 1936 - after being scolded by manager Eddie Dyer - Enos Slaughter vowed never to loaf again. His newfound commitment made him one of the game's greatest hitters' "(Slaughter) would run through a brick wall, if necessary, to make a catch, or slide into a pit of ground glass to score a run," wrote New York Times sportswriter Arthur Daley. "Country" was a 10-time All-Star and part of four World Series championship teams. He used a flat, level swing and was regarded as a consistent, clutch hitter. His "mad dash" home from first base on Harry Walker's hit won the 1946 Fall Classic for the St. Louis Cardinals. Elected 1985.

Lee Arthur Smith (born December 4, 1957) is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played 18 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for eight teams. Smith served mostly as a relief pitcher during his career. One of the dominant closers in baseball history, he held the major league record for career saves from 1993 until 2006, when San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Hoffman passed his total of 478. Smith was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on December 9, 2018 as part of the Today's Game Era Committee vote. A native of Jamestown in Bienville Parish in north Louisiana, Smith was scouted by Buck O'Neil and drafted by the Cubs in the 1975 MLB Draft. Smith was an intimidating figure on the pitcher's mound at 6 feet, 6 inches (1.98 m) and 265 pounds (120 kg) with a 95-mile per hour (150 km/h) fastball. In 1991, he set a National League (NL) record with 47 saves for the St. Louis Cardinals, and was runner-up for the league's Cy Young Award; it was the second of three times Smith led the NL in saves, and he later led the American League (AL) once while with the Baltimore Orioles in 1994. Smith also set the major league career record for games finished (802), and his 1,022 career games pitched were the third-most in history when he retired; Smith still holds the team records for career saves for the Cubs (180), and he also held the Cardinals record (160) until 2006. After the end of Smith‘s major league career, he spent time working as a pitching instructor at the minor-league level with the San Francisco Giants. Smith then served as the pitching coach for the South Africa national baseball team in the 2006 World Baseball Classic and 2009 World Baseball Classic. He is a minor-league roving pitching instructor for the Giants.

Ozzie Smith, "The Wizard of Oz," was in a class by himself when it came to fielding at shortstop, earning the National League Gold Glove Award in 13 straight seasons (1980-1992). In addition to setting major league records for assist, double plays and total chances by a shortstop, Smith proved to be a valuable offensive weapon, amassing 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases in his 19-year career. A 15-time All-Star, Smith was a key contributor to the St. Louis Cardinals' World Series championship in 1982. Elected 2002.

During a career that saw him go from starter to reliever and back to the rotation again, John Smoltz won 213 games and saved 154 more, becoming the first pitcher in history with at least 200 wins and 150 saves. An eight-time All-Star Game selection, Smith won the 1996 National League Cy Young Award and led the NL in wins twice. As a relief pitcher, Smoltz established himself as a lockdown closer, saving at least 44 games in each of three full seasons in the bullpen. A member of the 3000-strikeout club, Smoltz became the first elected to the Hall of Fame who underwent Tommy John surgery during his career. Elected 2015.

Dodgers fans loved Duke Snider, "The Duke of Flatbush." A California-bred center fielder who declared, "I was born in Brooklyn," Snider lead all major leaguers in home runs and RBI during the 1950s, hitting 40-or-more homers each of the last five seasons the Dodgers played at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. A graceful fielder with a picture-perfect swing, Snider anchored six pennant-winning teams and clouted 11 World Series home runs, including four in 1952 and 1955, while driving in 26 runs in the Fall Classic. Elected 1980.

Stylish Warren Spahn is the winningest left-hander in history with 363 victories - all but seven coming as a member of the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. Spahn turned 25 years old before winning his first game and was a 23-game winner 17 years later. Following his credo that "hitting is timing and pitching is upsetting timing," he used a wide repertoire of pitches and a smooth overhand delivery to baffle hitters for 21 seasons, winning 20 games 13 times. The World War II veteran hurled two no-hitters and won the 1957 Cy Young Award. Elected 1973.

Few batters hit the ball as hard as left-handed slugger Willie Stargell, who crushed 475 career homers, including a high of 48 in 1971. "He doesn't just hit pitchers," said fellow Hall of Famer, Don Sutton, "he takes away their dignity." He was more kind to teammates, rewarding them with "stars" for outstanding performance. His father-figure status earned him the nickname "Pops," and his leadership helped the Pittsburgh Pirates capture two World Series titles, in 1971 and 1979, the latter year when he shared the NL MVL honors. Elected 1988.

Casey Stengel's remarkable career included 14 years playing the outfield and 25 years managing in the major leagues. Always colorful and wildly popular, Stengel reached unparalleled success with the New York Yankees, winning 10 pennants and seven World Series from 1949 to 1960. An astute judge of talent who often platooned players and juggled his pitchers, he was equally admired for "Stengelese," his own brand of double-talk, which made him one of the most quoted people in baseball history. "The Yankees don't pay me to win every day - just two out of three," he once declared. Elected 1966.

Casey Stengel's remarkable career included 14 years playing the outfield and 25 years managing in the major leagues. Always colorful and wildly popular, Stengel reached unparalleled success with the New York Yankees, winning 10 pennants and seven World Series from 1949 to 1960. An astute judge of talent who often platooned players and juggled his pitchers, he was equally admired for "Stengelese," his own brand of double-talk, which made him one of the most quoted people in baseball history. "The Yankees don't pay me to win every day - just two out of three," he once declared. Elected 1966.

Responsible for popularizing the split-finger fastball, Bruce Sutter inspired manager Whitey Herzog to declare him, "the most dominating relief pitcher I've ever seen." Playing with the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and Atlanta Braves, Sutter saved 300 games in his career, five times leading the National League, and was the 1979 Cy Young Award winner. Regularly recording multi-inning saves - Sutter pitched 80 innings or more 10 times in 12 seasons - he baffled hitters with his late-breaking splitter. Sutter learned the devastating pitch from Cubs minor league pitching instructor Fred Martin while recovering from surgery on his pitching elbow in 1973, and claimed it saved his career. Elected 2006.

A model of consistency and durability throughout his 23-year major league career, Don Sutton won 324 games and struck out 3,574 batters while never missing his turn in the pitching rotation. Calling himself "a mechanic in a world of nuclear scientists," Sutton once surmised, "What I've done has been methodical, not spectacular." Translated, that meant double-digit win totals and more than 100 strikeouts inn 21 seasons, pitching in four World Series, notching shutout innings inn four All-Star Games and posting five career one-hit games. Elected 1998.

Bill Terry referred to hitting as a business. With a lifetime .341 batting average - a modern National League record for left-handed batters - his business was a resounding success. The last player in the NL to top .400, Terry socked 254 hits in 1930, when he hit .401. An excellent fielder and team leader, he succeeded John McGraw as the New York Giants manager in 1932 and won three pennants and a World Series championship in the next six years. Elected 1954.

Built like a bruising football player, Frank Thomas chose a bat and glove over shoulder pads at Auburn University, forging historic success on big league diamonds for almost two decades. Spending the bulk of his career with the White Sox, the powerful first baseman/designated hitter became the only player ever to string together seven straight seasons with at least 20 homers, 100 RBI, 100 walks and a .300 batting average. The five time All-Star captured back-to-back American League MVP Awards (1993-94) and ended his impressive career in 2008 with 521 homers, 1,704 RBI, a .301 batting average and a .419 on base percentage. Elected 2014.

Jim Thome combined massive power with a smooth batting stroke and a keen eye to total 612 home runs over 22 big league seasons. A third baseman when he debuted with the Indians, Thome moved across the diamond early in his career and become one of the most productive first basemen of his era. A five-time All-Star, Thome reached the 30-homer mark 12 times and led his league in walks three times. He hit 17 Postseason home runs over 71 games, including four home runs apiece in both the 1998 ALCS and the 1999 ALDS. Elected 2018.

Jim Thome combined massive power with a smooth batting stroke and a keen eye to total 612 home runs over 22 big league seasons. A third baseman when he debuted with the Indians, Thome moved across the diamond early in his career and become one of the most productive first basemen of his era. A five-time All-Star, Thome reached the 30-homer mark 12 times and led his league in walks three times. He hit 17 Postseason home runs over 71 games, including four home runs apiece in both the 1998 ALCS and the 1999 ALDS. Elected 2018.

Joe Torre followed success on the diamond with an even better career in the dugout. As a catcher-turned-infielder, he was a nine-time All-Star, the 1971 National League MVP and totaled 2,342 hits over 18 big league seasons. During 29 seasons as manager of the Mets (1977-81), Braves (1982-84), Cardinals (1990-95), Yankees (1996-2007) and Dodgers (2008-10), Torre posted 2,326 wins, fifth all time. In his final 15 managerial seasons, he led his clubs to 14 postseason appearances. With the Yankees, Torre won six pennants and became one of only five skippers to win at least four World Series titles (1996, 1998-2000). Elected 2014.

A durable all-around shortstop, Alan Trammell anchored the Tigers infield for 20 seasons, earning six All-Star Game selections, four Gold Glove Awards and three Silver Slugger Awards along the way. A .285 lifetime hitter, Trammell added power to his game as his career progressed and worked his way into Detroit's cleanup role in the lineup by 1987, a rarity for a shortstop of his era. He batted .450 with two home runs and six RBI in the Tigers' five-game World Series victor over the Padres in 1984, earning MVP honors. Elected 2018.

The pride of the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1920 to 1937, Harold "Pie" Traynor was regarded by John McGraw as "the finest team player in the game." A .320 lifetime hitter, Traynor batted better than .300 in 10 seasons and never struck out more than 28 times in a single campaign. An excellent third baseman, he set the fielding standard by which decades of successors were measured. He was immensely popular as a player and a person. Red Smith wrote that "no truer gentleman every wore spikes." Elected 1948.

Although Lloyd Waner only weighed 150 pounds, "Little Poison" was one of the toughest outs of his era, striking out just 173 times in 18 seasons. Hall of Fame manager Al Lopez observed that Waner "had unbelievable speed for those days, " which enabled him to patrol the wide paces of center field at Pittsburgh's Forbes Field. Though he lacked power at the plate (83 percent of his 2,459 career hits were singles), he frustrated pitchers and infielders by beating out ground balls, batting .316 lifetime. As a Pittsburgh Pirates rookie in 1927, Waner batted .355, racking up 223 hits- still an NL rookie record. Elected 1967.

Earl Weaver's management style could be described as feisty, confrontational and opinionated, but behind the raucous façade was a first-rate baseball mind. The "Earl of Baltimore" - emphasized pitching, defense and the three- run homerun. Weaver explained, "A managers job is to select the best players for what he wants done. They're not all great players, but they can all do something." His organizational system, revered as "The Oriole Way," focused on fundamental skills and planned player development, a formula that led to four American League pennants and one World Series championship (1970) during his tenure. Elected 1996.

Once described as, "170 pounds of scrap-iron, rawhide and guts," Zachariah Davis Wheat, was a model of consistency during a 19-year career, spent mostly with Brooklyn of the National League. Wheat's soft spoken demeanor belied a competitive fierceness on the diamond. Considered an intelligent ballplayer with impressive defensive skills, Wheat vexed his opponents with line-drive hitting, which netted 2,884 career hits. Beloved by the fans in Brooklyn, Wheat was remembered by Casey Stengel as "the only great ballplayer who was never booed." Elected 1959.

After earning a Purple Heart while serving in WWII, James Hoyt Wilhelm made it to the major leagues in 1952, at age 29. Wilhelm developed his reputation as the master of the knuckleball - a pitch he used effectively in more than 1,000 relief appearance's. "It takes no effort at all to pitch a knuckleball," Wilhelm said. "No windup is necessary . It's so simple that that very little warm-up in the bullpen is necessary." Wilhelm won 143 games, including a record 124 out of the bullpen, and no-hit the New York Yankees in a 1958 start. Elected 1985.

Often overshadowed by more flamboyant stars, Billy Leo Williams was a steady performer who seldom missed a start. "People say I'm not an exciting ballplayer," Williams said, "I go out there and catch the ball, hit the ball and play the game like it should be played." Williams accumulated 2,711 hits and 426 home runs during an 18-year career. Manager Leo Durocher once said of Williams, "Well, this year I'm going to give him some rest. But every time I make out my lineup card, I have to put him in there - it would be like scratching Whirlaway and Seabiscuit from the big race." Elected 1987.

Dick Williams specialized in turning losers into winners, and he did it often enough to earn a place in Cooperstown. Following a 13-year big league playing career that ended in Boston after the 1964 season, Williams spent two seasons managing in Triple-A before being named the Red Sox's manager in 1967. The rookie skipper led the Sox to their "Impossible Dream" season, going from ninth place the year before to an AL pennant. He took over the Oakland A's in 1971 and led them to three AL West titles, two league pennants and two World Series championships in three seasons. After a stint with the Angels, he turned the Expos into consistent winners before heading to San Diego, where in 1984 he led the Padres to their first NL pennant. He finished with 1,571 victories over a 21-year managerial career. Elected 2008.

Theodore Samuel Williams had only one goal in life; to walk down the street and have people say, "There goes the greatest hitter who ever lived." In a 19 year career with the Boston Red Sox - twice interrupted by military service - "The Splendid Splinter" won two Triple Crowns, two MVP Awards and six batting championships. He retired with a career average of .344 and remains the last player to top .400 for a full season (batting .406 in 1941). With keen eyesight, quick wrists and a simple motto - "Get a good ball to hit" - Williams compiled all the evidence he needed to achieve his goal. Elected 1966.

A five-tool player who starred in baseball and basketball at the University of Minnesota, Dave Winfield never spent a day in the minor leagues. He utilized his superb athleticism to amass 3,110 hits, 465 home runs, seven Gold Glove Awards and 12 All-Star selections in a 22-year career. The 6-foot-6 Winfield also proved to be a team leader. Teammate Brian Harper once said, "We all look up to him, I didn't realize he was such a great guy. As big a star as he is, he's pretty humble." Elected 2001.

The winner of exactly 300 games during a 23-year career, Early Wynn was a hard-nosed competitor. Once asked would he throw at his grandmother, Wynn replied, "Only if she was digging in." Mickey Mantle once said, "He'd knock you down in the dugout." Wynn won at least 20 games five times, recorded 49 shutouts and earned nine All-Star selections. He captured the 1959 Cy Young Award while helping lead the Chicago White Sox to the World Series. Wynn's durability enabled him to top the American League in innings three times. His 23 seasons in the AL remain a league record total for pitchers. Elected 1972.

Carl Michael Yastrzemski won three batting titles, was named to 18 All-Star teams and played left field in front of Fenway Park's Green Monster flawlessly. Owner of both 3,000 hits and 400 home runs, Yastrzemski stated in his Hall of Fame induction speech, "I can stand before you today and tell you honestly that every day I put on that Red Sox uniform, I gave 100 percent." The 1967 American League MVP and Triple Crown winner spent his entire career with the Boston Red Sox, leading the league in runs scored, doubles, and slugging percentage three times each. Elected 1989.

Robin Yount was a productive hitter who excelled in the field at two of baseball's most challenging positions - shortstop and center field. Playing his entire 23-year career for the Milwaukee Brewers, Yount collected more hits in the 1980s than any other player, finishing his career with 3,142. An everyday major leaguer at age 18, Yount earned two American League MVP Awards (1982 at shortstop, 1989 in center field). In 1982 Yount led the Brewers to the World Series. Elected 1999.

Roy Campanella broke into baseball with the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro National League at age 16 and joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948. He was selected to eight All-Star Games and played in five World Series. Strong defensively, "Campy" also was a star with the bat, setting then-records for single-season (41) and career (242) home runs by a catcher. He won three National League Most Valuable Player Awards (1951. 1953 and 1955). His playing career was cut short by an automobile accident in 1958. Elected 1969.