Sports - Hall of Fame Umpires (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

A World War II Coast Guard veteran who became a umpire as a result of a coal mining strike, Al Barlick served as a National League umpire for 28 years, breaking in at the age of 25. With seven All-Star games and seven World Series assignments, he developed a reputation for hustle, a stern demeanor, and a strict, but fair interpretation of the rules. Elected 1989.

Considered the model umpire of the post-war era, Nestor Chylak was a skillful arbiter who earned the respect of players and managers alike during his 25-year major league career. The longtime American League crew chief worked five All-Star Games, three League Championship Series and five World Series. During service in the U.S. Army in World War II, he nearly lost his eyesight in the Battle of the Bulge after being struck by shrapnel from an exploding shell. His courage merited the prestigious Silver Star and Purple Heart. Elected 1999.

Jocko Conlan became an umpire by accident when Red Ormsby was overcome by the heat while umpiring a 1935 game between the Chicago White Sox and the St. Louis Browns. Conlan, then an outfielder with the White Sox, was asked to fill in. The following year, Conlan launched a new career. A polka-dot tie, balloon chest protector and a quick grin became his trademarks. Conlan won the respect of players and managers alike with his hustle, accuracy and fairness. He umpired in five World Series. Elected 1974.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

The Father of American League Umpiring, Tom Connolly grew up a cricketer in England and wasn't introduced to baseball until he immigrated to the U.S. at age 15. From that point on he devoted his life to our national pastime. Among many milestones are his umpiring at the first A.L. game, the first World Series, and the inaugural game at Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium. There were eight World Series in all during his five decade career, plus three no hitters and one perfect game (Addie Joss). Connolly also mentored young umpires and young players alike. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1953, just eight years before his death at age 90. Due to his small signing window--not to mention the then lower demand for umpire autographs--only about a handful of Connolly signed plaque postcards are known to exist. Elected 1953.

Athletic and educated, Billy Evans was only 22 when he joined the American League umpiring crew in 1906, becoming the youngest major league umpire in history. Working six World Series during a 22-year career, Evans was lauded for fairness and superior integrity. Evans once said, "The umpire must be firm and insistent in his dignity but must not be officious." Besides being an umpire, Evans was an accomplished sportswriter. He later served as a front office executive for the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers. Elected 1973.

A methodical, authoritative umpire in the National League for more than three decades, Doug Harvey became so revered that players, managers and even fellow umpires dubbed him "god." Harvey joined the Senior Circuits umpiring crew in 1962, the first umpire hired in the big leagues who did not attend umpires school. Working 4,673 games over 31 years - including 18 seasons as crew chief - Harvey often drew assignments in the game's biggest events, including six All-Star Games, nine National League Championship series and five World Series. Elected 2010.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Big, tough and smart, Cal Hubbard was one of the game's most respected umpires and was selected to call four World Series and three All-Star Games. Hubbard had perhaps the strongest eyesight in sports, but a hunting accident damaged his vision, cutting short his career. He then supervised umpires and devised new ways to position them. Hubbard was a great athlete included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's first induction class and listed as the most feared lineman of his time. He remains the only man to be enshrined in both the Pro Football and National Baseball halls of fame. Elected 1976.

Colorful and flamboyant, Bill Klem brought dignity and respect to his profession. Know as "The Old Arbitrator," he umpired almost exclusively behind the plate his first 16 years because of his superior ability to call balls and strikes. Klem was among the first to use arm signals to coincide with his calls. Proof of is skill and universal respect were his 18 World Series assignments. Klem umpired from 1905 to 1941 and the served as chief of National League umpires. When honored at the Polo Grounds on September 2, 1949, he declared: "Baseball to me is not a game; it is a religion." Elected 1953.

Bill McGowan was an exception to the old adage that fans don't pay to see the umpire. He introduced a colorful umpiring style with aggressive body gestures bordered on the pugnacious, Yet McGowan ejected very few players. His enthusiasm never waned over 30 American League seasons, while his hustle and skill commanded the players respect. In 1933, McGowan selected to be a member of the umpiring crew that worked the initial All-Star Game. He was an iron man among umpires - not missing an inning for 16 years, spanning 2,541 consecutive games. Elected 1992.