Sports - 1936-1939 Baseball HOF Inductees (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Cobb was one of the games greatest players and fiercest competitors. His batting accomplishments are legendary - a lifetime average of .366, 4,189 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 consecutive seasons in which he hit better than .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), 295 triples and 2,244 runs. "The Georgia Peach" also stole 897 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. While Ruth was considered the best, Cobb was always next. Elected 1936.

Undeniably the hardest throwing pitcher of his era, Walter Johnson was celebrated as much for his character as for his heroics on the mound. In a career that spanned from the rowdy Deadball Era through the Jazz Age. "The Big Train" always behaved in a noble and gentlemanly fashion, both on and off the field. "I throw as hard as I can when I think I have to throw as hard as I can," he reasoned when endlessly questioned about his fastball. Pitching his entire big league career with the Washington Senators in the nation's capital, Johnson finished with 417 wins, second only to Cy Young and 3,509 strikeouts, a record that stood for 56 years. Elected 1936.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

Still an American icon decades after his death, George Herman "Babe" Ruth emerged from humble beginnings to become the game's greatest slugger and gate attraction. Ruth hit home runs at a prodigious rate - his single season output often exceeded those of entire major league teams. He retired with 714 career home runs, at a time when only tow other players had reached 300. He also posted a record of 94-46 in 163 games as a pitcher, most coming before he became a regular in the outfield. Reggie Jackson once deflected a comparison to "The Sultan of Swat," saying, "There will never be another Babe Ruth. He was the greatest home run hitter who ever lived." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

One of the Hall of Fame's first inductees in 1936, Honus Wagner combined offensive and defensive excellence throughout a 21-year career. He hit .300-or-better in 15 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles while batting .328 lifetime. Wagner also led the league in stolen bases in five seasons. Primarily a shortstop, he excelled everywhere in the infield and outfield despite an awkward appearance - barrel-chested and bowlegged, John McGraw called him "the nearest thing to a perfect player no matter where his manager chose to play him." Elected 1936.

Circa 1890 Morgan Bulkeley signed cut signature: A veteran of the Union Army in the Civil War and first president of the Aetna Life Insurance Company, Bulkeley is best remembered today as the founder of the Hartford Dark Blues of the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (1874) and first president of the National League (1876). Elected 1937.

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Byron Bancroft "Ban" Johnson (January 5, 1864 – March 28, 1931) was an American executive in professional baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League (AL). Johnson developed the AL—a descendant of the minor league Western League—into a "clean" alternative to the National League, which had become notorious for its rough-and-tumble atmosphere. To encourage a more orderly environment, Johnson strongly supported the new league's umpires, which eventually included Hall of Famer Billy Evans. With the help of league owners and managers such as Charles Comiskey, Charles Somers and Jimmy McAleer, Johnson lured top talent to the AL, which soon rivaled the more established National League. Johnson dominated the AL until the mid-1920s, when a public dispute with Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis culminated in his forced resignation as league president.]

Napoleon "Nap" Lajoie combined graceful fielding with precision at the plate. Lajoie hit .300 or better in 17 of 21 seasons, topping .350 in nine campaigns and his high of .426 in 1901 remains an American League single-season record. That year, he won the AL Triple Crown and initiated the first court challenge to the reserve clause. By 1903, the Cleveland club became known as the "Naps" as a tribute to his star power. Billy Murphy, a St. Louis journalist, once wrote; "As long as baseball lives, the memory of Lajoie will last; and it ever will be a fresh memory of a ball player and a gentlemen. Elected 1937.

Connie Mack won five World Series titles, a record nine American League pennants, and 3,731 games, nearly 1,00o more than any other manager in history. Still, "The Tall Tactician," is best remembered as a dignified leader who donned a business suit to dispense wisdom to a generation of players. "Your born with two strikes against you, so don't take a third one on your own," Mack was fond of stating to his clubs. Though his entrance to baseball came by playing catcher for 11 seasons, in 1901 Mack assumed control of the Philadelphia Athletics, the team he would lead for the next 50 years. Elected 1937.

"There has only been one manager, and his name is John McGraw," Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack once declared. McGraw was a fiery third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles in the 1890's, but he received much more recognition as an innovative, autocratic field manager. In his 31 years at the helm of the New York Giants, McGraw's teams won 10 pennants, finished second 10 times, and won three World Series titles. "Little Napoleon" finished his career with 2,763 managerial wins. As a player, he was credited with helping to develop the hit-and-run, the "Baltimore Chop," the squeeze play and other strategic moves. Elected 1937.

The most celebrated defensive outfielder of the Dead Ball Era, Tris Speaker played a shallow center field, amassing a record 449 assists and mastering the unassisted double play. John Lardner wrote that Speaker was "as free and easy in the broad spaces of an outfield as a wild horse on a prairie." A terrific hitter with a .345 lifetime average, Speaker set the career record of 792 doubles and finished with 3,514 hits. A successful player-manager, he led the 1920 Cleveland Indians to the World Series championship. Elected 1937.

George Wright was an accomplished cricket player who helped transform baseball into the National Pastime. Wright was a star on the first all-professional team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings. In addition to possessing excellent hitting skills, Wright revolutionized the role of the shortstop. Hall of Famer Jim O'Rourke said, "George Wright never had any equal as a fielder, base runner and batsman, combined with heady work of a quality never accredited to any ball tosser. All his qualifications taken together, he was really in a class by himself." Elected 1937.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

Suffering from epilepsy and haunted by his experience in combat during World War I, Grover Cleveland "Pete" Alexander still managed to win 373 games during a 20-year career. He led the National League in ERA on five occasions, wins in six seasons, complete games six times and shutouts during seven campaigns. Alexander also won 30-or-more games in three consecutive seasons. Elected 1938.

A pioneer of early baseball, Henry Chadwick influenced the game by wielding a pen, not bat. The renowned journalist developed the modern box score, introduced statistics such as batting average and the concept of earned and unearned runs, wrote numerous instructional manuals on the game and edited multiple baseball guides. He was an influential member of baseball's early rules committees, and his tireless work and devoted love for the game greatly aided in popularizing baseball during its infancy. Elected 1938.

A major figure in 19th century baseball, the strong willed Adrian Constantine "Cap" Anson played five seasons in the National Association and 22 in the National League, mainly at first base with Chicago. He batted better than .300 during 24 of those seasons and was the first player to accumulate more than 3,000 hits. He served as player-manager for Chicago, earning more than 1,200 wins and capturing five NL pennants in a seven year stretch from 1880 to 1886. Elected 1939.

A major figure in 19th century baseball, the strong willed Adrian Constantine "Cap" Anson played five seasons in the National Association and 22 in the National League, mainly at first base with Chicago. He batted better than .300 during 24 of those seasons and was the first player to accumulate more than 3,000 hits. He served as player-manager for Chicago, earning more than 1,200 wins and capturing five NL pennants in a seven year stretch from 1880 to 1886. Elected 1939.

Signed in 1906 at age 18, Eddie Collins played 25 seasons in the major leagues - a 20th-century record for position players. In 10 seasons, he batter better than .340, helping earn membership in the exclusive 3,000 hit club. The fiery second baseman starred in the famous "100,000 infield" with the Philadelphia Athletics and also for the Chicago White Sox. The "choke-grip" batting style Collins used proved fruitful. An aggressive and confident second baseman, he also was an outstanding baserunner. Elected 1939.

Charles Comiskey experienced success as a player, manager and owner for a half century. In 1883 - at the age of 23 - he became player-manager of the American Association's St. Louis Browns, leading them to four consecutive pennants from 1885 to 1888. He was one of the founders of the upstart American League in 1901 and owned the Chicago White Sox for 31 years, winning four pennants. In 1910, he built famed Comiskey Park, an impressive steel structure that lasted 80 years. Elected 1939.

Baseball's "Iron Horse," Lou Gehrig teamed with Babe Ruth to form the sport's most devastating tandem. A "Gibraltar in cleats," Gehrig posted 13 consecutive seasons with 100 runs scored and 100 RBI, averaging 141 runs and 149 RBI. The two-time American League Most Valuable Player set an AL mark with 185 RBI in 1931, hit a record 23 career grand slams and won the 1934 Triple Crown. His .361 batting average in seven World Series led the New York Yankees to six titles. A true gentleman and a tragic figure, Gehrig's consecutive games played streak ended at 2,130 when he was sidelined by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a disease that now bears his name. Elected 1939.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

A sharp batting eye and extraordinary fielding ability at first base led Ty Cobb to call George Sisler "the nearest thing to a perfect ballplayer." The owner of an engineering degree, Sisler was one of baseball's most intelligent and graceful players, starring predominately for the St. Louis Browns. he won two batting titles, hitting better than .400 both times, and amassed 257 hits in 1920 - a record that stood for 84 years. Sisler had a 41-game hitting streak in 1922 and hit .300-or-better 13 times while compiling a .340 lifetime average. Elected 1939.

The game's premier pitcher of the 1870s, A.G. Spalding led the league in victories in each of his six full seasons. His 47 wins in 1876 keyed the Chicago White Stockings' drive to the inaugural National League championship. One year later, he turned his boundless energies to the sporting goods business and executive roles with the White Stockings, where he gained renown as the era's top promoter of baseball as the national game, "The genius of our institutions is democratic," Spalding maintained. "Baseball is a democratic game." Elected 1939.