Sports - 300th Win Club (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Though slight in stature, Charles "Kid" Nichols was a giant among pitchers. In a 15-year career, Nichols - known for his velocity, curve and control - dominated late-19th century hitters, winning 361 games. During one stretch, he won at least 26 games for nine consecutive seasons. Nichols completed 532 of the 562 games he started. "You stayed in there and worked in those days," Nichols said. "My objective was to have the batter hit at the first one, and the second one and the third one. By that time, barring fouls, I figure he is either out or had made a hit." Elected 1949.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

Nicknamed "Cy" - short for Cyclone - Denton True Young was one of the most consistent and durable pitchers in baseball history. Cy Young set records that will probably stand forever. He won more than 30 games five times and recorded 20-or-more victories in an astounding 15 seasons. Young explained: "I had a good arm and legs. When I would go to Spring Training, I would never touch a ball for three weeks. I never did any unnecessary throwing." His 511 career wins along with the record for innings pitched 7,355, games started, and this stat is just plain crazy, he has 749 complete games, set a standard that may never be broken. Pitchers today are lucky if they pitch 15 total games a season. Elected 1937.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

"Christy Mathewson was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. He had knowledge, judgment, perfect control and form," raved Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack. "Big Six" won 373 games in 17 seasons, almost entirely for the New York Giants. Using his famous fade-away pitch, Mathewson won at least 22 games for 12 straight years, which included four 30-win seasons. His lone championship in four World Series appearances came in 1905, when he tossed three shutouts in six days against the Philadelphia Athletics. Mathewson set the modern National League mark with 37 wins in 1908. Elected 1936.

Undeniably the hardest throwing pitcher of his era, Walter Johnson was celebrated as much for his character as for his heroics on the mound. In a career that spanned from the rowdy Deadball Era through the Jazz Age. "The Big Train" always behaved in a noble and gentlemanly fashion, both on and off the field. "I throw as hard as I can when I think I have to throw as hard as I can," he reasoned when endlessly questioned about his fastball. Pitching his entire big league career with the Washington Senators in the nation's capital, Johnson finished with 417 wins, second only to Cy Young and 3,509 strikeouts, a record that stood for 56 years. Elected 1936.

Suffering from epilepsy and haunted by his experience in combat during World War I, Grover Cleveland "Pete" Alexander still managed to win 373 games during a 20-year career. He led the National League in ERA on five occasions, wins in six seasons, complete games six times and shutouts during seven campaigns. Alexander also won 30-or-more games in three consecutive seasons. Elected 1938.

Journalist Arthur Baer once noted, "Lefty Grove could throw a lamb past a wolf." Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove, arguably one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all time, was famous for his hard-headed, competitive nature. Connie Mack purchased him from the minor-league Baltimore Orioles for a then-record $100,600 in 1924, and Grimes pitche the Philadelphia Athletics to three straight AL pennants and two World Series titles from 1929 to 1931, going 19-15. He led the league in wins on four occasions, in winning percentage in five seasons, in strikeouts seven consecutive times, and in ERA a staggering nine times. Elected 1947.

Stylish Warren Spahn is the winningest left-hander in history with 363 victories - all but seven coming as a member of the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. Spahn turned 25 years old before winning his first game and was a 23-game winner 17 years later. Following his credo that "hitting is timing and pitching is upsetting timing," he used a wide repertoire of pitches and a smooth overhand delivery to baffle hitters for 21 seasons, winning 20 games 13 times. The World War II veteran hurled two no-hitters and won the 1957 Cy Young Award. Elected 1973.

The winner of exactly 300 games during a 23-year career, Early Wynn was a hard-nosed competitor. Once asked would he throw at his grandmother, Wynn replied, "Only if she was digging in." Mickey Mantle once said, "He'd knock you down in the dugout." Wynn won at least 20 games five times, recorded 49 shutouts and earned nine All-Star selections. He captured the 1959 Cy Young Award while helping lead the Chicago White Sox to the World Series. Wynn's durability enabled him to top the American League in innings three times. His 23 seasons in the AL remain a league record total for pitchers. Elected 1972.

Gaylord Perry won 314 games, struck out 3,534 batters, earned Cy Young Awards in both leagues and hurled a no-hitter during his 22-yea major league career with eight teams. But the spitball - or more accurately, the threat of one - gave Perry his everlasting fame. The author of "Me and the Spitter" could distract and frustrate through an array of rituals on the mound, including fidgeting with his glove, uniform and bill of his cap. When Perry retired in 1983, he proclaimed, "The league will be a little drier now, folks." Elected 1991.

Richie Ashburn once likened Steve Carlton to an artist on the mound: "He painted a ballgame. Stroke, stroke, stroke, and when he go through it was a masterpiece." Carlton was an intense competitor with a hard biting slider that was complemented by a great fastball and curve. He ranks second on career lists for wins (329) and strikeouts (4,136) by a left-handed pitcher. In 1972, his first of four Cy Young Award-winning seasons, Carlton led the National League in wins (27), ERA (1.97), inning pitched (346.1) and strikeouts (310) - all for a last-place team that won only 59 games. Elected 1994.

Sparky Anderson once said, "My idea of managing is giving the ball to Tom Seaver and then sitting down and watching him work." Seaver, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps, pitched for the summer league Alaska Goldpanners and attending the University of Southern California before inking his first professional contract. Obtained by the New York Mets in a special draft lottery, "Tom Terrific" helped change the team from lovable losers into the "Miracle Mets" of 1969, when he won his first of three NL Cy Young Awards. He also earned the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year Award and garnered 12 All-Star selections. Elected 1992.

It takes a special weapon to pitch nearly a quarter of a century in the majors, and Phil Niekro's was the knuckleball. The pitch helped, "Knucksie" record 318 wins, 3,342 strikeouts and a 3.35 ERA during a 24-year career spent mostly with the Atlanta Braves. Niekro's famed pitch bewildered batters, Rick Monday once said, "The knuckleball actually giggles at your as it goes by," while Bobby Mercer recalled that "trying to hit him is like trying to eat Jell-O with chopsticks." Bob Uecker that catching Niekro was rewarding: "I got to meet a lot of important people, they all sit behind home plate."

A model of consistency and durability throughout his 23-year major league career, Don Sutton won 324 games and struck out 3,574 batters while never missing his turn in the pitching rotation. Calling himself "a mechanic in a world of nuclear scientists," Sutton once surmised, "What I've done has been methodical, not spectacular." Translated, that meant double-digit win totals and more than 100 strikeouts inn 21 seasons, pitching in four World Series, notching shutout innings inn four All-Star Games and posting five career one-hit games. Elected 1998.

With a dominating fastball and an unsurpassed work ethic, Nolan Ryan's career spanned four decades and culminated with an MLB-record 5,714 strikeouts. Ryan threw so hard - and could be so wild - that Reggie Jackson described him as "the only guy who could put fear in me. Not because he could get me out, but because he could kill me. You just hoped to mix in a walk so you could have a good night and go 0-for-3." Often among the league leaders in strikeouts, Ryan won 324 games and pitched a major league record seven no-hitters, three more that any other hurler in history. As team president of the Texas Rangers from 2008 until 2013, Ryan led the franchise to its first two World Series appearances (2010 and 2011). Elected 1999.

William Roger Clemens, nicknamed "Rocket", is an American former baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 ERA, and 4,672 strikeouts, the third most of all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, more than any other pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style. , which he used to intimidate batters.

Greg Maddux dazzled with his right arm, not his physique, making batters curse their fate. Showing mind boggling control for 23 seasons split mostly between the Cubs and Braves, the durable hurler spent only 15 days on the disabled list. At his best from 1992 to 1995, Maddux captured four consecutive NL Cy Young Awards, going 75-29 with a 1.98 ERA. The eight time All-Star collected a record 18 Golden Glove Awards and retired in 2008 with 355 wins, eight-most all time, while logging 3,371 strikeouts. Elected 2014,

An accomplished high school hockey player from New England, Tom Glavine spent more than two decades putting hitters' bats on ice. A strike-thrower with control and determination, Glavine was a fixture in the Braves rotation over 17 seasons, earning the 1995 World Series MVP and a pair of National League Cy Young Awards (1991, 1998). The 10-time All-Star and five-time 20-game winner ended his big league career in 2008 with a 305-203 record, a 3.54 ERA and 2,607 strikeouts. When the shrewd southpaw won his 300th game in 2007, he became just the 23rd pitcher (and fifth left-hander) to reach that milestone. Elected 2014.

Over 22 big league seasons, Randy Johnson won 303 games - the fifth-best total among all left-handers at the time of his retirement. The 6 foot 10 inch Johnson won the 1995 American League Cy Young Award with the Mariners and four straight National League Cy Young Awards with the Diamondbacks from 1999-2002. A fearsome competitor and 10-time All-Star, Johnson led his league in strikeouts nine times, mixing a blistering fastball with a darting slider. He shared World Series MVP honors with Diamondbacks teammate Curt Schilling after going 3-0 in the 2001 Fall Classic, leading Arizona to a seven-game victory over the Yankees. Elected 2015.