Sports - The 100 Greatest Baseball Autographs – The Modern Era (1960-Present) (Any Medium): Doyle Collection Image Gallery

Exhibiting an understated style that became his trademark, Hank Aaron hammered his way to baseball's all-time home run mark via one of the most consistent offensive careers in history. He hit 755 home runs, a record that stood for more than 30 years, and still holds major league marks for total bases, extra base hits and RBI, while his 3,771 career hits ranks third. He was the 1957 National League MVP, won three Gold Glove Awards for his play in right field and was named to a record 25 All-Star teams. Curt Simmons once said of Aaron, "Trying to throw a fastball by him is like trying to sneak a sunrise past a rooster." Elected 1982.

Noted for his cheerful disposition, excellent all-around play, and powerful home runs, Ernie Banks was a favorite among Chicago Cubs fans. A 14-time All-Star, he was twice voted National League Most Valuable Player and knocked 512 home runs during his 19-year career with the Cubs. The shortstop and first baseman twice led the league in home runs and RBI. "Mr. Cub" displayed his perpetual love for the game with his signature phrase "Let's play two!" Elected 1977.

In 1969, Ted Williams autographed a ball for Johnny Bench, "To a Hall of Famer for sure." Perhaps the best defensive catcher of all time, Bench won ten straight Gold Glove Awards and popularized the one-handed style of catching. Bench crushed 389 lifetime home runs and batted .267 for his career. He led the National League in home runs twice, RBI three times and total bases once. He won the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1970 and 1972 and the World Series MVP in 1976. With Bench behind the plate the Cincinnati Reds won four pennants and two World Series. Elected 1989.

Barry Lamar Bonds is a former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. Bonds received seven NL MVP Awards and 14 All-Star selections, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all-time. Bonds was regarded as an exceptional hitter; he led MLB in on-base plus slugging six times and placed within the top five hitters in 12 of his 17 qualifying seasons. He holds many MLB hitting records, including most career home runs, most home runs in a single season (73, set in 2001) and most career walks. He also received eight Gold Gloves for his defense in the outfield. He is ranked second in career Wins Above Replacement among all major league position players, behind only Babe Ruth.

In 21 seasons with the Kansas City Royals, George Brett topped the .300 mark 11 times, becoming the first player to win batting titles in three decades: 1976 (.333). 1980 (.390) and 1990 (.329). He led the American League in hits three times, finishing his career with 3,154, including 665 doubles, 137 triples and 317 homers. The 13 time All-Star was the AL Most Valuable Player in 1980 and earned a Gold Glove Award in 1985, the same year the Royals won their first World Series championship. Elected 1999.

William Roger Clemens, nicknamed "Rocket", is an American former baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 ERA, and 4,672 strikeouts, the third most of all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, more than any other pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style. , which he used to intimidate batters.

Don Drysdale teamed with Sandy Koufax during the 1960's to form one of the most dominating pitching duos in history. Utilizing numerous pitches to work both sides of the plate, Drysdale developed a reputation as an intimidator, hitting 154 batters to set a modern National League record. "The trick against Drysdale," said Hall of Game Slugger Orlando Cepeda, "is to hit him before he hits you." A workhorse as well, Drysdale led the NL in games started from 1962 to 1965, and set a record with 58 consecutive scoreless innings in 1968. The two-time 20-game winner won the Cy Young Award in 1962. Elected 1984.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

The first number No. 1 overall pick in the MLB Draft to be elected to the Hall of Fame, Ken Griffey, Jr. lived up to expectations by becoming one of the best all around players in the game's history. Born on Hall of Famer Stan Musial's birthday in Musial's hometown of Donora, PA., Griffey followed his father, Ken Griffey Sr., to the big leagues. He quickly revived the Mariners franchise with power at the plate, grace in center filed and charisma that sparkled throughout the baseball world. By the end of his 22-year big league career, Griffey had totaled 630 home runs, 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 Gold Glove Awards and the 1997 American League MVP Award. Elected 2016.

A star baseball and basketball player in college, Tony Gwynn opted for the diamond and fashioned a stellar 20-year career with the San Diego Padres. Gwynne's mastery of slapping the ball between the third baseman and shortstop- what lefty called the "5.5 hole" - propelled him to 3,141 career hits, a lifetime .338 hitting average and eight batting crowns, A National League record he shares with Honus Wagner. A true student of hitting, Gwynne was an early advocate of using videotape to study his swing, while his five outfield Gold Glove Awards, 319 career stolen bases and 15 All-Star Game selections attest to his superior all-around play.

Rickey Henderson, the "Man of Steal," blazed a trail across baseball with his baserunning and hitting ability. In 1982, Henderson set the modern major league record for stolen bases in a single season with 130. He went on to lead the American League in steals 12 times throughout his career and holds the all-time record with 1,406. He also tops the all-time lists in runs scored (2,295) and unintentional walks (2,129). Henderson - who played for nine teams - won the 1990 American League Most Valuable Player Award and took home World Series rings with the 1989 Athletics and the 1993 Blue Jays. Elected 2009.

Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Elston Gene "Ellie" Howard former professional baseball player. Howard on the field played catcher, left field, and also coached. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

Reggie Jackson was among the most charismatic players ever to don a baseball uniform. One of the few athletes to have a candy bar named after him, Jackson backed up his celebrity persona with 563 home runs and 11 trips to the postseason - including five World Series titles - in a 21-season major league career. "Mr. October's" crowning moment came in Game 6 of the 1977 Fall Classic when he belted three home runs - on three consecutive pitches - against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Elected 1993.

Harmon Killebrew epitomized raw power. His quiet demeanor contradicted an awesome presences at the plate, deserving of the nickname "Killer." "I did have power," he explained. In 22 major league seasons Killebrew blasted 573 home runs, including many monumental blows estimated at more than 500 feet. The 13-time All-Star was one of the first sluggers to receive intentional walks with the bases empty and captured the 1969 American League MVP Award, leading the circuit with 49 home runs and 140 RBI. Elected 1984.

Willie Mays, the "Say Hey Kid", excelled at all phases of the game with a boyish enthusiasm and infectious exuberance. His staggering career statistics totaled 3,283 hits and 660 home runs. "You used to think if the score was 5-0, he'd hit a five run home run," recalled Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson. The New York Giants superstar earned National League Rookie of the Year in 1951 and two NL MVP Awards (1954 and 1965). He accumulated 12 Gold Glove Awards and played in a record tying 24 All-Star Games. His catch of Vic Wertz's deep fly ball in the 1954 World Series remains one of baseball's memorable moments. Elected 1979.

Born in Akron, Ohio, Munson was selected as the fourth pick of the 1968 MLB draft and was named as the catcher on the 1968 College Baseball All-American Team. Munson hit over .300 in his two seasons in the minor leagues, establishing himself as a top prospect. He became the Yankees' starting catcher late in the 1969 season, and after his first complete season in 1970, in which he batted .302, he was voted AL Rookie of the Year. Consi9dered the "heart and soul" of the Yankees, Munson was named captain of the Yankees in 1976, the team's first since Lou Gehrig. That same year, he won the AL MVP Award, making him the only Yankee to win the Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. Munson led the Yankees to three consecutive World Series appearances from 1976 to 1978, winning championships in the latter two years. He is the first player in baseball history to be named a College Baseball All-American and then in MLB win a Rookie of the Year Award, MVP Award, Gold Glove Award, and World Series championship. He is also the only catcher in MLB postseason history to record at least a .300+ batting average (.357). 20 RBIs (22), and 20 defensive caught stealing's (24). During an off day in the summer of 1969, Munson died at age 32 while practicing landing his Cessna Citation aircraft at Akron-Canton Airport. He suffered a broken neck as a result of the crash, and his cause of death was asphyxiations. The Yankees honored him immediately retiring his uniform 15, and dedicating a plaque to him in Monument Park.

Sandaharu Oh, also known as Wang Chen-chih, is a retired Japanese-born Taiwanese baseball player and manager who played 22 seasons for the Yomiun Giants in Nippon Professional Baseball from 1959 to 1980. Oh holds the world lifetime home run record, having hit 868 home runs during his professional career. He established many NPB batting records, including RBI, slugging percentage, bases on balls, and on-base plus slugging in 1977. Oh became the first recipient of the People's Honour Award. He was inducted into the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Jose' Alberto Pujols Alcantara is a professional baseball first baseman and designated hitter for the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball. He previously played 11 seasons for the St. Louis Cardinals, with whom he was a three-time National League MVP and nine-time All-Star. He made his 10th All-Star appearance with the Angels in 2015. He is a member of the 500 home run club.

Cal Ripken Jr. gave new meaning to the phrase "everyday player." From May 30, 1982 through September 19, 1998, the lanky shortstop played in 2,632 consecutive games for the Orioles, shattering Lou Gehrig's "unbreakable" mark of 2,130. Beyond "The Streak," however, Ripken methodically put together a remarkable career, notching 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, 19 straight All-Star appearances and two MVP Awards. Though his solid, steady play earned him hero status throughout America, Ripken also had a fair for the dramatic, homering in both his record-setting 2,131st consecutive game and his final All-Star game. Elected 2007.

Mariano Rivera (November 29, 1969 - ) was the greatest closer in the history of major League Baseball and holds the records for most saves (608) in a career and most games finished (892). The Panama native began his career as a starter, starting ten games as a rookie and eventually moved into the setup man role. The Yankees used Mariano in the seventh and eighth inning in 1995 and 1996 holding the games for eventual closer John Wetteland. He won his first World Series in his second year as the Yankees beat the Atlanta Braves in six games in 1996. When Wetteland signed with the Texas Rangers following the season’s end, Rivera became the everyday closer. H has since spent 17 years in the closer’s role for the Yankees (1995-present) and dominated American League hitters with his devastating cut-fastball, or "cutter". Slugger Jim Thome, who amassed more than 600 home runs during his career and faced Rivera on numerous occasions, referred to Mariano’s cutter as "the single best ever in the game." Because of its speed and tailing tendencies, the cutter was known to break numerous bats. On one occasion, Braves slugger Ryan Klesko broke three bats in a single at-bat. His career was a lesson in success as he won five World Series championships (1996, 1998-2000, 2009), five AL Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards. Rivera has also led the Majors three times in saves and has earned 13 American League All-Star selections. On September 19, 2011, Mariano achieved his record-breaking 602nd save, passing Trevor Hoffman to become baseball’s all-time save leader. Over 19 years in Yankee pinstripes, Mariano Rivera has gone 82-60 with 1,173 strikeouts, 652 saves and a 2.21 ERA in 1,115 appearances and 952 games finished. At the 2013 Yankees spring training, Rivera announced that the 2013 season would be his last and he would retire at the end of the year at the age of 43. On July 17, 2013, Rivera pitched one inning in his 13th and final All-Star Game at the New York Mets CitiField. In front of adoring baseball fans and a "hometown" crowd of more than 45, 000, Mariano ran onto an empty field in the eighth inning as fans, players and managers stood at attention offering a standing ovation to the greatest relief pitcher in history. Rivera retired three straight batters and was awarded the 2013 MLB All-Star Game Most Valuable Player award, becoming the first reliever in history to receive the award. Mariano Rivera is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame's Class of 2019, and is the first player in history to be a unanimous Hall of Fame selection.

A major league player, manager, coach, executive and broadcaster, Frank Robinson has done it all. A two-time MVP (once in each league), Robinson was an aggressive outfielder and hard-charging base runner. "Frank was a great player," Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax said, "He had great tools, and he had great desire. He beat you any way he could." The 1986 American League Triple Crown winner, Robinson concluded his career with 586 home runs and just 57 hits shy of 3,000. His intelligence and leadership helped him become the major leagues' first African-American manager when he was named player-manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1975. Elected 1982.

Peter Edward Rose, Sr., also known by his nickname, "Charlie Hustle" is a former professional baseball player and manager. Rose played in the major leagues from 1963 to 1986, and managed from 1984 to 1989. Rose was a switch hitter and is the all-time MLB leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053), singles (3,215), and outs (10,328). He won three World Series rings, three batting titles, one MVP Award, two Gold Gloves, and the Rookie of the Year Award, and also made 17 All-Star appearances at an unequaled five positions (second baseman, left fielder, right fielder, third baseman, and first baseman), Rose won both of his Gold Gloves as an outfielder in 1969 and 1970. In August 1980 (his last year as a manager and three years after retiring as a player), Rose was penalized with permanent ineligibility from baseball amidst accusations that he gambled on baseball games when he played for and managed the Reds; the charges of wrongdoing included claims that he bet on his own team. In 1991, the Baseball Hall of Fame formally voted to ban those on the "permanently ineligible" list from induction, after previously excluding such players by informal agreement among voters. After years of public denial, Rose admitted in 2004 that he bet on baseball and on the Reds. The issue of Rose's possible reinstatement and election to the Hall of Fame remains contentious throughout baseball.

With a dominating fastball and an unsurpassed work ethic, Nolan Ryan's career spanned four decades and culminated with an MLB-record 5,714 strikeouts. Ryan threw so hard - and could be so wild - that Reggie Jackson described him as "the only guy who could put fear in me. Not because he could get me out, but because he could kill me. You just hoped to mix in a walk so you could have a good night and go 0-for-3." Often among the league leaders in strikeouts, Ryan won 324 games and pitched a major league record seven no-hitters, three more that any other hurler in history. As team president of the Texas Rangers from 2008 until 2013, Ryan led the franchise to its first two World Series appearances (2010 and 2011). Elected 1999.

Tremendous power and a keen batting eye led Hall of Fame pitcher Bruce Sutter to call Mike Schmidt "the best hitter in the game." In 1980, the 12-time All-Star won his first of three NL MVP Awards, leading the Philadelphia Phillies to their first-ever World Series title. His flair for dramatic and mammoth clouts resulted in 548 career home runs, while steady fielding earned him 10 Gold Glove Awards - including nine straight - at third base. Elected 1995.

Ichiro Suzuki, often referred to mononymously as Ichiro, is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder. With 27 seasons combined in top-level professional leagues, he spent the bulk of his career with two teams, nine seasons with the Orix Blue Wave of Nippon Professional Baseball in Japan, where he began his career, and 12 with the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball in the United States. After playing for the Mariners he played two and a half seasons in MLB with the New York Yankees before signing with the Miami Marlins before returning to the Mariners in 2018. Ichiro established a number of batting records, including MLB's single season for hits with 262. He achieved 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his major league career in both Japan and the United States, Ichiro has the most hits by any player in top-tier professional leagues. He also has recorded the most hits of all Japanese born players in MLB history.