(Newport Beach, California) - For the sixth consecutive year, the National Football League will use PSA/DNA Authentication Services (PSA/DNA) to combat potential counterfeiting of Super Bowl footballs. More than 100 footballs to be used in Super Bowl XXXIX on February 6 will be marked by PSA/DNA with a synthetic DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) strand that can be seen only when illuminated by a specific laser frequency.

PSA/DNA (www.psadna.com) is the world's largest sports memorabilia authentication company, and is a division of Collectors Universe, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLCT), Newport Beach, CA.

"Although invisible to the naked eye, the DNA mark fluoresces green when illuminated with the proper laser frequency. In using this method, authenticity can be determined many years from now even when the footballs have changed hands," explained Joe Orlando, PSA/DNA President.

"It is an extremely effective way to combat potential fakes because the DNA ink has an astronomical 1-in-33 trillion chance of being accurately reproduced by potential counterfeiters," Orlando stated.

In addition to the DNA-laced marking, a certificate of authenticity accompanies each Super Bowl football certified by PSA. The certificates feature serialized tamper-evident labels that can be verified via the Internet at www.psadna.com. Information on each ball is available to any third party interested in its authenticity.

PSA/DNA authenticated the bat used by Babe Ruth to hit the first home run in Yankee Stadium in 1923 and subsequently sold at a Sotheby's auction last year for nearly $1.3 million. The certification also has been used for Barry Bonds' 600th career home run baseball, Mark McGwire's 70th and Sammy Sosa's 66th home run baseballs in 1998. Other authenticated historical items include Hank Aaron's career 715th home run baseball and bat, and "Shoeless" Joe Jackson's famous "Black Betsy" baseball bat that was purchased for $577,000 in a 2001 auction.