Anderson's 1959 Topps #338
rookie card in PSA 9,
is currently valued at $450,
according to the current
Sportscard Market Report (SMR).
Anderson's 1959 Topps #338 rookie card in PSA 9,is currently valued at $450,according to the currentSportscard Market Report (SMR).

Sparky Anderson will wear a Cincinnati Reds hat when he is inducted to the Hall of Fame this summer. In his first year of eligibility, Anderson was elected to the Hall of Fame this week on February 29.

The Baseball Hall of Fame Veterans Committee selected Anderson, who will become the 16th manager inducted into the shrine. His career victory total (2,194) ranks him behind Connie Mack (3,731) and John McGraw (2,784) in career wins.

The only manager to have the most career wins for two franchises decided to wear the Reds hat for the plaque. Rules require inductees to select only one team uniform on the player's Hall of Fame plaque.

Born February 22, 1934 in South Dakota, George Lee Anderson grew up in Los Angeles. His career began as a batboy for the USC Trojans. After high school, he played for the Philadelphia Phillies and spent six years in the minor leagues. In 1959, Anderson played for the Phillies as a regular second baseman. He never played in the majors and later quit playing to pursue managing.

Sparky's Influence On Star Players

Anderson's nickname "Sparky" came from his scrappy determination. He managed in the minor leagues for five years and later went on to become manager of the Cincinnati Reds prior to the 1970 season. His incredible lineup included Joe Morgan, Pete Rose, and Johnny Bench.

Known as the "Big Red Machine," the Reds averaged more than 100 wins per season from 1972 through 1976. During the nine seasons when Anderson managed the team, the Reds won 863 games and four pennants. Anderson guided the team to World Series victories in 1975 over the Red Sox and in 1976 beat the Yankees.

Anderson left the Reds after the 1978 season. In 1979, he joined the Detroit Tigers in mid-season and posted a winning record in each of his first 10 years with Detroit. In 1984, the Tigers (led by Jack Morris, Alan Trammell, and Lou Whitaker) won the championship over the San Diego Padres in the World Series.

Known for his superb handling of young players, he guided players like Alan Trammell, Kirk Gibson, Jack Morris, and Ken Griffey Sr. into their development as baseball stars.

Johnny Bench credited Anderson's influence as the catalyst behind the talented Big Red Machine in the 1970s. Bench said that Sparky taught players to play the game right, act the right way and set images and roles which the players carried the rest of their lives.

Anderson retired in 1995 after winning 1,331 games in 17 seasons with the Tigers. Overall, Anderson's winning percentage was .545 with 2,194 total wins. He was 863-586 with the Reds and 1,331-1248 with the Tigers. His career record in postseason games is 34-21 for a winning percentage of .618.

Induction Ceremony To Include Cincinnati Reds Lineup And Others

Anderson has never visited the Hall of Fame. He said that he never wanted to go there until he belonged there.

On July 23, Anderson will be inducted into the shrine at Cooperstown, N.Y. along with his former Cincinnati Reds first baseman Tony Perez and Boston catcher Carlton Fisk. The Baseball Writers' Association of America elected both players in January. Marty Brennaman, a Reds broadcaster, will also be inducted this summer.

And The Winners Are...

The Baseball Hall of Fame Veterans Committee could select one person in each of the four categories: former major leaguers; a combination of managers, umpires, executives and Negro Leaguers; 19th century players and personnel; and Negro leaguers.

Besides Sparky Anderson, two other players elected by the Veterans Committee include Negro leagues star Turkey Stearns and 19th century second baseman Bid McPhee.

No Winners In The HOF Major League Player Category

For the first time since 1993, the panel failed to elect anyone in the former major league player category. Candidates included Bill Mazeroski, Mel Harder and Gil Hodges.

Both committee members and fans were surprised and disappointed. Panel member Yogi Berra expressed disappointment that the committee did not decide on a former big league player.

Seven-time All-Star and eight-time Golden Glove winner Bill Mazeroski was one vote shy of the 11 votes needed from the 14-member panel. Many admirers see him as the best fielding second baseman in history. Mazeroski is recognized as hitting one of the most famous home runs in history for Pittsburg in his bottom-of-the-ninth shot during Game 7 of the 1960 World Series against the New York Yankees.

Ted Williams supported Mel Harder's election, but was unsuccessful in influencing the panel. Harder had received support from fans of the Cleveland Indian pitcher. Harder is now 90 years old and some panel members wanted to see him at the ceremonies this summer.

The late Brooklyn first baseman Gil Hodges received nationwide support from fans in an intense letter-writing campaign. As a manager of the 1969 Miracle Mets, he guided them to the World Series championship. Supporters were surprised that Hodges was denied since Tony Perez and Orlando Cepeda (first basemen with comparable statistics) were selected in the last two years.

Supporters have expressed hope that the Veterans Committee will vote for these players next year and induct them into Cooperstown's Hall of Fame.

SPARKY ANDERSON
& RELATED SPORTSCARD VALUES
EX 5
EX MT 6
NM 7
NM MT 8
MT 9
Sparky Anderson
1959 Topps # 338 Rookie
20
30
55
110
450
1960 Topps # 34
5
8
13
30
95
1971 Topps #688 SP
N/A
12
18
45
100

Players Sparky Anderson Managed:

EX 5
EX MT 6
NM 7
NM MT 8
MT 9
Johnny Bench
(HOF) 1968 Topps #247 Rookie
45
75
105
195
540
1969 Topps #95
15
25
45
100
350
1970 Topps #660
N/A
40
65
125
650
1970 Topps #464 All Star
N/A
8
12
22
80
1971 Topps #250
10
20
55
280
EX 5
EX MT 6
NM 7
NM MT 8
MT 9
Pete Rose
1963 Topps #537 Rookie
290
375
625
1,375
4,800
1964 Topps #125
40
70
120
300
1,100
1965 Topps #207
40
60
100
240
1,200
1966 Topps #30
15
25
40
95
300
1967 Topps #430
25
40
70
175
500
1969 Topps Supers #41
N/A
150
250
525
825
1970 Topps #580
N/A
20
45
115
400
1971 Topps #100
N/A
15
30
95
400
EX 5
EX MT 6
NM 7
NM MT 8
MT 9
Joe Morgan
(HOF) 1965 Topps #16 Rookie
20
35
60
120
350
1966 Topps #195
8
10
17
35
125
1967 Topps #337
8
10
15
30
125
1968 Topps #144
8
10
15
30
100
1969 Topps #35
6
8
15
25
100
1969 Topps Supers #42
N/A
45
75
165
260
1970 Topps #537
N/A
6
10
20
75
1971 Topps #264
N/A
6
11
25
80
1972 Topps #132
N/A
6
8
18
60
EX 5
EX MT 6
NM 7
NM MT 8
MT 9
Tony Perez
1965 Topps #581 Rookie SP (HOF)
25
40
65
145
275
1966 Topps #72
8
12
20
45
130
1967 Topps #476 SP
20
35
50
110
250
1968 Topps #130
5
8
10
25
60
1968 Topps 3-D
250
350
600
1,100
1,900
Source: March 2000 Sportscard Market Report
His sophomore card, the 1960 Topps #34,is currently valued at $95 in PSA 9.
His sophomore card, the 1960 Topps #34,
is currently valued at $95 in PSA 9.